fbpx
Best Youth Basketball Finishing Drills

Best Youth Basketball Finishing Drills

One of the most important elements to designing a valuable practice plan is deciding what core basketball elements you’ll concentrate on. Many practices begin with traditional layup lines and jump shots. But how often are the players simply going through the motions of those drills? Installing the right warm up drills will vastly improve the efficiency of your practice. Adding these Youth Basketball Finishing Drills will help take your young team to the next level of its development.

Youth Basketball Finishing Drills: Star Passing with Finish

Star Passing is common one in many gyms, but this version of the drill incorporates the necessary element of finishing with a made basket. This doubles well not only as a basketball practice warm up drill, but also as a game warm up.

Basketball Practice Warm Up DrillsThe drill begins with players arrayed in a star across the half court. The ball starts with the line under the basket. There are lines in the corners, as well as on the wings.

The first pass goes from under the basket to the left wing. The passer follows their pass and joins the end of that line. From there, the left wing passes to the right corner and follows. Right corner makes a baseline pass to the left corner and follows.

The final move in this initial turn through the drill involves the left corner feeding the player that cuts from the right wing. That player receives the pass and finishes the turn with a layup.

Variations of the drill can incorporate a number of additional basketball elements. Coaches can require that the ball never hits the floor. They can reverse the flow of the drill to work on left-hand layups. Coaches can have a defender waiting at the rim to challenge the finisher. The list goes on an on.

Youth Basketball Finishing Drills: DeMatha Finishing Drill

Basketball Practice Drills

This youth basketball finishing drills stands among Coach Steger’s favorite basketball practice drills. The DeMatha Finishing drill can be particularly valuable as both a practice drill and as a pregame warmup drill.

This drill pits two players against one another in a simple clash of offense and defense. It’s a high-impact, fast-paced drill where the offensive player attacks the basket and the trailing defender needs to recover. The drill features two lines and usually a coach for passing. Players can stand in for the coaches as passers if need be.

The drill itself can be situated in a number of different spots on the floor. Where the drill starts can be dictated by the coach and what the team needs are.

The drill itself is simple. The passer feeds the offensive player, who must finish at the rim from their starting point. The offensive player can try   a dunk or layup. The defender, meanwhile, must contest the shot as best they can. Physical play can be encouraged for the defense to help the offense improve finishing through contact.

Head over to the TeachHoops YouTube channel for more videos with basketball finishing drills.


Related: Running an Effective Preseason Basketball Open Gym


Resources:

TO DEVELOP AN UNSTOPPABLE BASKETBALL TEAM AND DOMINATE YOUR LEAGUE, YOU NEED PROVEN OFFENSIVE AND DEFENSIVE PLAYS! 

Click here for: Proven Basketball Playbooks, Drills and Strategies!

Don’t miss out on big discounts for TeachHoops Readers:
  • Code: TeachHoops (for 20 percent off)
  • Code: Combo25 (for 25 percent off combo packs)


High Schoo Hoops Podcast: 

High School Hoops

Ep 14: Teaching Finishing Close To The Basket


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Setting Up a Basketball Playbook

Setting Up a Basketball Playbook

Heading into a new season, basketball coaches juggle a number of important responsibilities. Hopefully, coaches used the offseason to better themselves in preparation for the new year. But no matter what level a coach find him or herself coaching at, setting up the right basketball playbook for the team remains an integral step.

Coaches can use the offseason to accomplish several different goals, including becoming a better leader. Often times, evaluating last season’s performance comes at this point, as well as fine tuning the approach to practice planning. But setting up the team’s playbook should also be an important exercise.

Keys to a Good Basketball Playbook

A playbook crystalizes a team’s offensive and defensive approach. It helps build the team’s identity and provides a path to in-season success. Laying out the different sets and plays before hand can often help with drill selection and practice flow. Coaches seek to teach these sets and plays in order to leverage a team’s strengths, both from an individual and a collective perspective.

Any good basketball playbook relies on two relatively broad offensive categories. Those categories are: Man-to-Man Offense, Zone Offense and Specials.

  • Man-to-Man Offense: Teams execute these plays against man-to-man defenses, where each defensive player guards one offensive player. These plays aim to create opportunities for offensive players with staples such as the use of pick-and-rolls.
  • Zone Offense: Teams execute these plays against zone defenses, where defenders patrol specific areas in the half court rather than matchup one-on-one. These plays seek to leverage space, movement, and mismatches to create scoring opportunities.
  • Specials: Specials are those plays designed for specific situations in a given game. The most common offensive specials include Baseline Out of Bounds (BLOB) plays, Sideline Out of Bounds (SLOB) plays, and Press Breakers.

Fundamental Actions in a Good Basketball Playbook

Any basketball coach, no matter the level, should implement fundamental actions into their playbook. These actions often create the foundations for more complex plays and sets in a given offensive strategy. These actions should be incorporated in even the simplest youth basketball playbook.

  • Pick and Roll: The pick-and-roll remains the most recognizable offensive action at any level of basketball. In this action, an offensive player sets a screen (or pick) for the ball handler. The ball-handler reads the defense before deciding his or her next move, either driving to the basket or making a pass. The screener in this action rolls to the hoop and prepares to receive a pass, whether that pass is coming or not. This action remains a staple of any man-to-man offense.
  • Pass and Cut: Pass and cut is an offensive tactic in which a perimeter player with the ball passes to a teammate then executes a cut, typically towards the hoop. This basic action looks to draw attention from the defense and limit rotations or overplays. The pass and cut approach works for both man-to-man offenses and zone offenses.
  • Ball Reversal: The ball reversal action in basketball involves an offense working the ball via pass from one side of the court to the other. When executed properly, this action forces a defense to scramble and can create openings for cutting lanes or jump shots. This action can work against either defensive setup, but it is most effective against aggressive zone defenses.

Tips for Building a Basketball Playbook

No basketball playbook is created equal. Coaches should assess the skill level of their players before making definitive choices for their offensive approach. There’s such a wide variety of plays that coaches can certainly find something that will work for their team. But when building a playbook, youth basketball coaches should consider the following three tips.

  1. Start Simple. This is particularly true if a coach is dealing with newcomers to the sport or relatively inexperienced youth teams. Players will perform all the better as beginners when they aren’t too slowed by thinking about the next action in a play. Layering skills and actions in practice can often set up more complex plays later in the season.
  2. Embrace Space. One of the key skills young players need to develop is being able to move without the ball. Using the full court for drills and conditioning is a must for coaches, especially at the youth level. When designing a playbook, getting players to understand spacing will improve the effectiveness of each set. This is especially true against zone defenses.
  3. Add Variety. Experienced basketball coaches sport deep playbooks, pulling sets to combat specific defenses. Newer basketball coaches need to remember that incorporating a variety of plays into the playbook will help keep players engaged and prevent opponents from keying on tendencies. Avoid becoming predictable at all costs.

Click HERE for a TeachHoops Playbook Template. 


TO DEVELOP AN UNSTOPPABLE BASKETBALL TEAM AND DOMINATE YOUR LEAGUE, YOU NEED PROVEN OFFENSIVE AND DEFENSIVE PLAYS! 

Click here for: Proven Basketball Playbooks, Drills and Strategies!

Don’t miss out on big discounts for TeachHoops Readers:
  • Code: TeachHoops (for 20 percent off)
  • Code: Combo25 (for 25 percent off combo packs)

Related: 3 Effective Full Court Basketball Drills


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast: 

Youth Player Development

Ep 1356 10 Keys to A Good Zone Offense

Ep 1318 Picking an Offense and Full Court Pressure Discussion


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

3 Simple Plays to Run in Youth Basketball

3 Simple Plays to Run in Youth Basketball

Picking the right offense for a youth basketball team can be one of the most difficult decisions for any coach. After evaluating the skill level of a team, coaches must emphasize the sets and skills that will put his team on track for success. But when dealing with newcomers to the sport, sometimes having simple basketball plays to start with is the way to go.

Youth coaches often spend a great deal of time practice planning and developing the right mix of drills to incorporate with their young players. When it comes down to designing an offensive set, being able to score in the half court often dictates success in games. Add these three simple basketball plays that are easy to run to your basketball playbook.

Simple Basketball Plays: Basic Pick and Roll

One of the simple basketball plays even coach should incorporate is the basic pick and roll. This play works well against man-to-man defenses and remains a staple of the game in the professional ranks. Basketball offenses can repeat this action over and over until a good look opens up. This play can start in several different alignments.

Using a 4-out, 1-in alignment, the point guard dribbles to the wing, with three players on the opposite perimeter. Player 5 comes up from the low post to set a screen for the point guard on the wing. The ball handler drives off the screen toward the basket while player 5 rolls into the lane. The driver decides to either take a shot or make a pass to the roller. If neither option is available, the driver can kick the ball out to a teammate on the perimeter.

The beauty of this simple basketball play remains the free-flowing nature of the action. The ball handler gets to read and react to the defense. The screen also gets to decide how to move based on the defense’s alignment. Screeners can roll to the hoop or pop to a open spot on the perimeter for a jump shot.

Coaches can layer off-ball actions for the other players as well. This will help keep the weak side defenders occupied and hesitant to help. Basic pick and roll action can be implemented effectively in end-of-game situations and even in transition.

Simple Basketball Plays: Short Corner Jump Shot

Naming the sets can vary from team to team, but this simple basketball play aims to get a open look for a jump shot at the short corner along the baseline.

The play begins with a 3-out, 2-in alignment, with the big men occupying the blocks. The point guard dribbles up and initiates the play with a pass to either wing. The big man on the ball-side of the play comes up to set a screen at the elbow for the point guard after the pass.

The point guard uses the screen and runs a J-shaped cut toward the baseline. The player on the wing looks to pass the ball to the baseline if the point guard is open for a jump shot. If not, the player can dribble to the top of the key and reset the play.

This play works well at the youth level because it involves the basic action of pass and cut. The big man sets a high screen and either roll to the basket or flare for a shot. Having a simple basketball play that can easily reset allows the team to feel more comfortable.

Simple Basketball Plays: Double Screen Curl

The next simple basketball play looks to get another open jump shot. This play uses a 4-out, 1-in alignment to start, though the order along the perimeter doesn’t really matter. For this play, coaches should set the shooter to start in the corner.

The play begins with the point guard dribbling up and making a pass to the 3 on the wing. That player immediately swings the ball to the 4 in the corner. Once the ball ends up in the corner, the point guard and player 3 set a double screen for the shooter, who’s coming up from the opposite corner.

Player 4 looks first to the shooter coming around the double screen. If that option isn’t there, player 4 can then look to player 5, who’s on the low block. 5 mirrors the movement of the ball along the perimeter with each pass, going from elbow to elbow, then to the low block.

This play works well at the youth level because it involves basic movement along the perimeter. The interior player follows a simple run for this basketball play, mirroring the ball with each pass. Should the defense cover both the shooter and the low post, this play can easily be run again in the opposite direction.

Click HERE for a TeachHoops Playbook Template. 


TO DEVELOP AN UNSTOPPABLE BASKETBALL TEAM AND DOMINATE YOUR LEAGUE, YOU NEED PROVEN OFFENSIVE AND DEFENSIVE PLAYS! 

Click here for: Proven Basketball Playbooks, Drills and Strategies!

Don’t miss out on big discounts for TeachHoops Readers:
  • Code: TeachHoops (for 20 percent off)
  • Code: Combo25 (for 25 percent off combo packs)

Related: Basketball Combination Defenses


Resources:


High School Hoops Podcast

High School Hoops

Ep: 153. Picking an Offense for you Team


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Basketball Team Shooting Drills

Basketball Team Shooting Drills

Incorporating the right basketball drills for a team makes all the difference for coaches at the youth level. Coaches need to gauge the skill and talent they’re working with, instituting a practice plan to maximize the growth of these young players. Developing specific basketball skills early sets both the player and the team up for success, so picking the best basic shooting drills for kids can be a good place to start.

One of the most important parts of any coach’s practice plan is the incorporation of basketball shooting drills. These drills are valuable no matter the level of the team or the talent of the individual player. Shooting remains a key aspect of the game, and only through repetition and focus can a player improve.

For coaches, finding the right drills for your team can be frustrating. Depending on the team’s level and the talents of the gathered players, coaches sift through dozens of drills, searching for the right series. It’s important for a coach to understand their team’s ability and continuously push them to improve.

When developing shooting drills, a good coach must consider what types of shots they want to focus on. Drills should reinforce the skills that will help the players perform within the context of a game. So shooting drills should be designed around shots that would normally result from a team’s offensive actions. The best basketball shooting drills are representative of a team’s base offense.

Basketball Team Spot Shooting Drill

Basketball Shooting DrillsTeam Spot Shooting is one of the most valuable basketball shooting drills. This practice sequence emphasizes form shooting and positioning, all within the framework of a team competition.

This drill involves a set number of players progressing through a series of shots on the floor. The group might start at the short corner, then move to the elbow, free throw, opposite elbow and opposite short corner.

In order to progress to the next spot, the group needs to make a designated number of shots in a row. Once the group has made three from the short corner, for example, they move to the elbow. But if they miss at the elbow, a coach can signal either that the team runs or returns to the previous spot.

This drill can be redesigned as a practice game as well.

 

3-2-1 Basketball Shooting Drill

Basketball Shooting DrillsThe 3-2-1 basketball team shooting drill involves at least two players and is a high-volume, high-repetition practice. Over the course of one or two minutes, non-stop, a single shooter progresses through a series of jump shots. The other player rebounds and feeds the shooter from near the hoop.

The shooter begins behind the three-point line for their first shot. From there, the shooter moves into the midrange for their second shot. The last shot in the sequence is a layup (which is worth one point). The rebounder keeps track of the shooter’s score as their teammate progresses through the drill. After the time is up, the players switch roles.

This shooting drill provides valuable practice for any shooter, regardless of talent-level. The shooter must move, set their feet and find a repeatable release. Even the other player gets reps at securing rebounds and making solid passes.

This drill can incorporate internal competition as well. The two partnered players can compete with one another, or with another pair at another hoop.

 


Related: Keys to Coaching Youth Basketball

Resources:


High School Hoops Podcast

High School Hoops

Ep: 120. Basketball Shooting Drills for Any Level


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Best Basic Shooting Drills for Kids

Best Basic Shooting Drills for Kids

Incorporating the right basketball drills for kids makes all the difference for coaches at the youth level. Coaches need to gauge the skill and talent they’re working with, instituting a practice plan to maximize the growth of these young players. Developing specific basketball skills early sets both the player and the team up for success, so picking the best basic shooting drills for kids can be a good place to start.

Finding the right balance for your practice is key. You want your players to practice hard, hone their skills, and become better basketball players. But you also want them to have fun. Coaching at the youth level takes plenty of patience and positivity. You’ll need to incorporate a fast pace and keep your players occupied and engaged, especially during potentially monotonous skill development drills. Developing focus and fun at practice remains an integral effort for coaches at the youth level of the game.

While there’s no magic formula for practice planning or picking drills, leaning on your experience as a head coach often shows the right path for your players. Here’s a look a some of the best basic passing drills for kids.

Proper Shooting Form

It’s important for young players to learn the proper shooting form early so as to not develop bad habits that can be hard to break. Although the kids will want to start shooting immediately, coaches must make them understand chucking the ball does more harm than good. And becoming a great shooter isn’t an easy thing to do!

A good approach to teaching shooting form involves the nemonic “BEEF.” Beef stands for Balance, Elbow, Eyes, Follow Through.

Balance often refers to a shooter’s stance. While there’s no specific stance to teach, generally the feet should be about shoulder-width apart, turned slightly, with the lead foot forward a bit and knees bent. For Eyes, shooters should look in the direction of the rim. While there’s no one spot that must be taught, players can focus on the rim.

The shooter’s elbow remains the key to a shot’s accuracy. Players should try to set the shooting eye, the shooting hand and elbow, and the rim all on the same line. The shooting motion involves the hand and elbow getting under the ball, making an up and out motion. Make sure the elbow doesn’t flare out. Once set, the wrist should hinge at an angle with the forearm.

Follow Through is the release. The shooter should snap their wrist as the ball is released at the same time the elbow is fully extended. The ball should roll off the index and middle fingers to produce a backspin. Shooters should keep their arm extended and not let the off-hand push the ball at an angle on release.

Remember, this shooting method is designed to simplify the approach for inexperience players and kids just coming to the game. It’s not something to teach to more experienced players since it doesn’t address the nuances of great shooting.

Basic Shooting Drills for Kids

Teaching the proper shooting fundamentals remains integral for coaches at the youth level of basketball. Here are some of the best basic shooting drills for kids to help in that process.

Form Shooting

To practice the basic shooting form, kids can participate in this drill with a partner or a group of three. Form shooting allows the players to practice not only the right way to shoot, but also develop concentration. This drill remains ideal for coaches in a station setting.

Shooters begin at a given spot on the floor, depending on their strength, ability, and perhaps position. The shooter should assume the proper stance (hands up, knees bent, feet set) and await a pass. The player catches the pass and comes up shooting. Each player should take 10 shots before progressing to another spot. After another 10 attempts, the player moves to a third spot.

This drill works as a good warm-up before practice, or as part of a larger station rotation for coaches. Stress to each player the need to use the proper form, practicing each element to develop that muscle memory.

Step-Back Shooting

Another one of the valuable basic drills for kids is step-back shooting. This exercise helps players develop and improve their shooting touch with each repetition.

Shooters begin directly in front of the rim for this drill. Players should start low with the ball and arc the shot up over the rim, finishing high with the release. Shooters need to hold their form until the ball passes through the net, taking five shots in total. After the last make, the shooter should step back one and make another five shots. The shooter continues until they reach the foul line.

This drill provides direct reinforcement of the basic shooting form kids should learn. Coaches should stress hand and finger placement, as well as the motion of the elbow, as part of their instruction.

Knockout

A fun competitive game to incorporate into your practices is knockout. This enjoyable shooting drill provides kids the opportunity to learn proper form while under pressure and with a heightened sense of urgency.

Players line up in single-file at the free throw line. The first two players in line have a ball and the drill begins with the first shot attempt. If the first shooter makes his free throw, he retrieves the ball and passes to the next person in line. Then he joins the back of the line. If he missed his shot, he must grab the rebound and make a layup before the next shooter makes their attempt. Should the first shooter can make a layup before the second player scores, he’s still in the game. If the second shooter makes a shot before, the first player is eliminated.

Each time a player takes and misses a shot, the next player in line shoots to try to knock them out. Hence the name of the game. The drill continues until only one player remains, the winner.

There are several points of emphasis for this drill. Each player should maintain proper mechanics and form when shooting. Keep your head up and be aware of other players. Coaches can also stress form with layup attempts and return passes.


Related: Best Basic Passing Drills for Kids

More: Best Youth Basketball Finishing Drills


Resources:


Coaching Youth Hoops Podcast Episodes


Coaching Youth Hoops podcast5 Things I Wish I Had Known About Coaching Youth Hoops

The Skills Needed for K-2 Players

Thoughts on Running A Youth Basketball Camp

Basketball Skills for Grades 3-5

 

If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

5-Out Motion for the Rule of 3 Basketball Offense

5-Out Motion for the Rule of 3 Basketball Offense

The Rule of 3 basketball offense provides coaches with a concise offensive set up to help your team succeed. This offensive approach works against man and zone defenses and makes operating on that side of the floor easier. Some continuity offenses can be difficult to digest, but the Rule of Three basketball offense remains clear with straightforward principles. A key point of emphasis for this basketball offense is 5-Out Motion

What the Rule of 3 offense does for a basketball coach is provide a pared down approach that highlights the strengths of a given team. The key to any good offense is finding the openings, and this does just that. This offense remains predicated on ball movement, player movement, and spacing to create scoring opportunities.

Rule of 3 basketball


5-Out Motion for the Rule of 3 Basketball Offense


5-Out motionFor the Rule of 3 basketball offense, using 5-Out motion often provides the most space for your team.

The term “5-Out” references the fact that all offensive players on the floor are starting outside the three-point line. Typically, the setup features one player at the top, two on the wings, and two in the corners.

The 5 Out alignment is the base for the Rule of 3 offense. All five positions are interchangeable but can be set up to match locations with player skills.

This “position-less” offense relies on floor spacing and a set of basic movement that assist players to determine actions.

The basic concept for 5-Out Motion features an easy-to-understand set up: cut and replace. Each of the five spaces along the perimeter should be occupied by an offensive player.

When one player cuts, his teammates shift along the perimeter in corresponding fashion. If too many players end up on one side, the coach could call to “balance the floor” from the sideline.

5-out motion

A good way to start teaching 5-Out Motion on a pass is to have the passer cut to the basket with everyone rotating to replace the open slot. The only exception to this rule is a pass from the corner.


5-Out Motion: Pass and Cut Drill


5-out motion provides basketball teams at any level a key structure. This is especially true for youth basketball teams. This set up forces players to make decisions by reading the play of their teammates and defenders. It remains a great tool for teaching players how to play basketball.

One drill to teach basic 5-Out motion to your basketball team is a simple pass-and-cut drill.

5-out motion

This drill begins with Player 1 making a pass to the wing. From there, that player cuts to the basket. When that cut occurs, everyone behind the pass rotates to fill the open space along the perimeter. Player 1 takes the open space in the corner after his cut.

Next, the ball is passed to the right again and the passer cuts to the basket. Once again, the weak side players rotate to fill all open spots. The only exception to this rule is a pass from the corner. A pass from the corner results in a short cut and retreat. A pass up from the wing to the top results in the corner player rotating up to fill on the wing, making sure all five players participate in station movement.

Stress to your players the key concept of great spacing. If they’re in the right positions at the right time, the offense should be wide open. This approach opens driving lanes and minimizes quick help from opposing defenders. 

Coaches can teach 5-Out Motion in progressions to avoid their players getting overwhelmed learning an entire offense all at once.


Get started with the Rule of 3 Offense Course HERE!


Related: What’s the Mesh Point in Rule of 3 Basketball?


Resources:


The Coach Unplugged Podcast

Cover for Basketball Coach Unplugged ( A Basketball Coaching Podcast)

Ep 1465 Rule of 3 Offense

What’s the Mesh Point in Rule of 3 Basketball?

What’s the Mesh Point in Rule of 3 Basketball?

The Rule of 3 basketball offense provides coaches with a concise offensive set up to help your team succeed. This offensive approach works against man and zone defenses and makes operating on that side of the floor easier. Some continuity offenses can be difficult to digest, but the Rule of Three basketball offense remains clear with straightforward principles. A key point of emphasis for this basketball offense is the mesh point.

What the Rule of 3 offense does for a basketball coach is provide a pared down approach that highlights the strengths of a given team. The key to any good offense is finding the openings, and this does just that. This offense remains predicated on ball movement, player movement, and spacing to create scoring opportunities.

Rule of 3 basketball

The Rule of 3 Offense Basketball Mesh Point

The “Mesh Point” in the Rule of 3 basketball offense remains perhaps the most pivotal part of this scheme. Simply, the mesh point is the place where a screen occurs on the basketball floor. It’s at this juncture that the screen and the cutter need to read their defenders to determine the next progression in the offense.

Mesh Point basketballThe mesh point remains the focal point of the Rule of 3 basketball offense. In the graphic shown here, the mesh point becomes the moment when Player 1 sets a screen for Player 3.

Both Player 1 and Player 3 see multiple options depending upon how the defenders choose to play this action.

Since Player 3 receives the screen, he gets to read the defenders at the mesh point first. His options include a slice cut, a curl cut, or to cut high.

After Player 3 makes his read at the mesh point, Player 1 follows with his read on the basketball floor. Player 1’s options include a slip to the basket, to screen away for the wing, or pop high after a curl.

The offensive players should look to vary their cut based on the defender. Each offensive player should look to take advantage of the momentary confusion any unexpected movement caused the defense.

Several key fundamentals need reinforcement from basketball coaches when working through mesh point reads. First, drill the proper form for setting screens. Next, drill how to operate off screen as the cutter. Finally, drill how to “slip” a screen. When preparing to read the defense, teach your players which cut to use. Stress the value of varying cuts to create confusion in the defense.

Get started with the Rule of 3 Offense Course HERE!


Related: Basketball Terms for the Rule of 3 Offense


Resources:


The Coach Unplugged Podcast

Cover for Basketball Coach Unplugged ( A Basketball Coaching Podcast)

Ep 1465 Rule of 3 Offense

Key Basketball Terms for the Rule of 3 Offense

Key Basketball Terms for the Rule of 3 Offense

The Rule of 3 basketball offense provides coaches with a concise offensive set up to help your team succeed. This offensive approach works against man and zone defenses and makes operating on that side of the floor easier. Some continuity offenses can be difficult to digest, but the Rule of Three basketball offense remains clear with straightforward principles. Using the basketball terms for the Rule of 3 is key.

What the Rule of 3 offense does for a basketball coach is provide a pared down approach that highlights the strengths of a given team. The key to any good offense is finding the openings, and this does just that. This offense remains predicated on ball movement, player movement, and spacing to create scoring opportunities.

Rule of 3 basketball

The Rule of 3 Offense Basketball Terms

Learning the different basketball terms out there remains a challenges for many young players and new coaches. Understanding the key words for a variety of offenses and defenses, as well as the myriad rule violations, makes digesting this information often a daunting task. The Rule of 3 offense is no exception in regards to basketball terms.

So before you and your team dive into the ins and outs of the Rule of 3 basketball offense, you’ll want to know the key terms.

General Rules:
  • 5-Out
    • Starting position for the offense.
    • All 5 players are outside the 3-point line and spaced evenly: point, both wings and both corners.
  • Mesh Point
    • In the Rule of 3 offense this is the place where a pick occurs, and the picker and cutter need to read their defenders.
  • “Balance the Floor”
    • Coach call when too many players are on one side of the floor and not in the 5-Out positions.
Passer Options:
  • “Slip”
    • Rule of 3 picker option to cut to basket after setting pick for cutter.
  • “Pop”
    • Rule of 3 picker option to pop to the 3-point line after reading the cutter using the pick to cut to the basket.
Cutter Options:
  • “Slice”
    • Rule of 3 cutter option to cut straight to the basket when using pick.
  • “Curl”
    • Cutter option to curl into lane off the pick in the Rule of 3
  • “Fade”
    • Rule of 3 cutter option to fade to sideline rather than use pick to cut high.
Weakside Options:
  • “Interchange”
    • High and low weakside offensive players exchange positions to keep defenders busy.
  • “Up or Down Pick”
    • High and low weakside offensive players exchange positions by one picking for the other.
  • “Pin & Skip”
    • Weakside interchange with one man picking and the other fading to the 3-point line vs. sagging defenses.

Get started with the Rule of 3 Offense Course HERE!


Related: How to Promote Your Basketball Program


Resources:


The Coach Unplugged Podcast

Cover for Basketball Coach Unplugged ( A Basketball Coaching Podcast)

Ep 1465 Rule of 3 Offense

What is the Rule of 3 Basketball Offense?

What is the Rule of 3 Basketball Offense?

The Rule of 3 basketball offense provides coaches with a concise offensive set up to help your team succeed. This offensive approach works against man and zone defenses and makes operating on that side of the floor easier. Some continuity offenses can be difficult to digest, but the Rule of Three basketball offense remains clear with straightforward principles.

What the Rule of 3 offense does for a basketball coach is provide a pared down approach that highlights the strengths of a given team. The key to any good offense is finding the openings, and this does just that. This offense remains predicated on ball movement, player movement, and spacing to create scoring opportunities.

Rule of 3 Basketball Offense: Basic Concepts

The Rule of 3 basketball offense operates from either a four-out or five-out set. The 5-out alignment clears the key and leverages cutting lanes. It’s looking to force defenders into difficult choices, then attacking the open spaces that result. This offensive approach focuses on what cuts, positions, and scoring opportunities you can get based on reading the opposing defender.

The offense features several basic concepts players need to understand. First, everyone moves on every pass. All cuts are based on reading your defender. So, every defensive overplay should result in a backdoor cut. Every pick is a potential slip opportunity. Finally, and perhaps most important, keep the lane clear.

These basic concepts help maximize the effectiveness of the Rule of 3. Each player understands they’re moving with each progression. This shifts all the pressure to the defense. To leverage the movement and stress on the defense, offensive players should limit themselves to about three dribbles. From there, make a move to score or make the next pass.

Advantages of the Rule of 3

Continuity offenses like the Princeton offense or the Read and React stand out as effective options for some basketball coaches. However, these offenses often feature numerous layers that can be daunting for young players to memorize and call upon. Players hesitate, thinking through a progression, which allows defenses to counter.

The advantages of the Rule of 3 basketball offense include:

  • Players don’t have to memorize different plays
  • They learn how to play basketball by reading and reacting to what the defense does
  • It’s hard to scout and defend because cuts aren’t predetermined
  • It can be as simple or as complex as you want it to be

This freedom allows basketball coaches to mold their offense to the talent-level of their team that season. The flexibility of this offense is such that players will adjust with each possession, learning more efficiently in both practice and games.

Not forcing players to memorize specific movements for a set removes the anxiety many young players feel on offense. It helps each player develop a high basketball IQ. Learning how to read and react appropriately is also a valuable skill outside of basketball.

Perhaps the best part of installing the Rule of 3 for basketball coaches is, the unpredictable nature of this offense makes it hard to scout. Players might cut differently each time down the floor, depending upon what their defender does or how their teammates move. And the flexible nature of this offense allows coaches to add complexities as players gain confidence.

Get started with the Rule of 3 Offense Course HERE!


Related: How to Promote Your Basketball Program


Resources:


The Coach Unplugged Podcast

Cover for Basketball Coach Unplugged ( A Basketball Coaching Podcast)

Ep 1465 Rule of 3 Offense

Basketball Continuity Offense

Basketball Continuity Offense

Coaching basketball at the youth level invariably involves dealing with zone defenses. The most common zone, 2-3, allows developing teams to hide certain players on the defensive end. It can also frustrate offenses to no end, especially if the offensive players tend to stick to their spots. So, as zones become more and more common even at the game’s highest levels, it’s integral that every coach knows exactly what they want to do when attacking a 2-3 zone. Using a continuity offense often helps.

One of the most common misconceptions to combating a good zone is the reliance on distance shooting. Teams might have a reliable zone-buster on their team, capable of consistently draining three-pointers. But the reality is most defenses would rather their opponent launch from deep rather than attack for higher percentage shots near the rim.

Continuity Offense Attacking a 2-3 Zone

Continuity offense stands as one of the most valuable approaches to attacking a 2-3 zone. These plays and sets create a rhythm and offensive flow that allows the team to stress the opposing defense. Offensive players know where to go as each pass is made within the continuity. The constant flow forces the defense to adjust, not only to each pass but also to each cut.

attacking a 2-3 Zone

The set up for this continuity offense involves using a 1-3-1 counter to the 2-3 zone. 1 brings the ball down, with 2 and 3 on the wings. 4 occupies the high post, while 5 takes the low post. The initial action is a pass to either wing. 4 reads that initial pass, then cuts with the ball to that strong-side corner (or short corner).

From there, 5 presents as a low-post option and 2 cuts across from the opposite wing. 2 flashes to the open elbow area, while 1 makes a flare cut to the opposite wing. 3 reads the movement of the defense before making the next pass. If 2 doesn’t immediately receive the ball at the elbow, they lift to the top of the key.

attacking a 2-3 Zone

The continuous element of this continuity offense comes if the defense recovers through the initial movement. 3 gets the ball to 2, who reverses to 1. As the ball switches sides, both 4 and 5 cut to the new strong side of the offense. 4 makes the baseline cut behind the zone, while 5 flashes to the opposite low post.

As the ball reverses, 3 makes the cut across, flashing to the open elbow. 2 makes a flare cut to the opposite wing, away from the ball.

Keys to Attacking a 2-3 Zone

The first, and perhaps most important, key to attacking a 2-3 zone remains not settling for a three-point shot. Of course, if a three-pointer comes as a clean result of an offensive action, then by all means take it. But too often, teams settle for threes against zones because they can’t consistently pressure the paint. Approaching the zone with a one-pass-shot, or ball-reversal-shot, gets the defense off the hook.

Another key to combatting the zone is movement. Many times, the offensive players stand around and the zone shifts with each pass. The offense occupies set positions during the possession in hopes of finding an opening. The reality is, the openings won’t appear until more than just the ball moves. Accompanying a pass with a hard cut, filling the vacant spots, and forcing the defense to account for the movement stresses the rigidity of the zone.

A forgotten key against a zone defense is offensive rebounding. With defenders occupying designated areas instead of checking specific players, boxing out becomes problematic. Facing any zone creates lanes for offensive players to crash the boards on missed shots. The misses often result in scramble situations which could yield good scoring opportunities.

The final key to dealing with this defensive set up is learning how to screen the zone. While ball screens are typically staple counters against man-to-man defense, learning to screen the zone forces the defense to immediately adjust their alignment. If the defense doesn’t adjust, huge openings appear within the zone itself. Using a continuity offense helps.

Variations to this Continuity Offense

A variation for this set could involve 5 cutting to the corner or short corner, then 4 cuts into the low post. This would be an option of the 4 and 5 are interchangeable on offense.

Another variation involves using a skip pass. If the defense overplays the elbow cut, or overplays the potential ball reversal at the top, the wing can use the skip pass to the opposite side. As that skip is happening, 4 and 5 make their cross cuts like normal.

A drawback to running continuity will always be the defense learning the cuts that are coming. Adding a slight variation to the progression might catch the defense off guard. Varying this continuity with an overload option should yield good looks.

In the overload, 1 makes the initial wing pass, but instead of cutting away, 1 cuts to the strong side corner. From there, 5 turns and screens the middle of the zone and 4 flashes to the open low post area. 2 can stay wide for a skip pass or cut up to the top of the key.

attacking 2-3 zone

It’s key for the offensive players to be patient when attacking a 2-3 zone. Force the defense to adjust to each pass and cut before settling for a shot. The initial progression through the continuity might not yield openings, but as the offense moves, the defense must remained disciplined. If the defense is slow to adjust, the openings will be there.


Related: Key Basketball Warmups: Hamstring Stretches

Resources:

The Coach Unplugged Podcast

Cover for Basketball Coach Unplugged ( A Basketball Coaching Podcast)

Ep 1365 10 Keys to a Good Zone Offense

Read and React Sets: Ball Screen Shooter Lift

Read and React Sets: Ball Screen Shooter Lift

In this ever changing world of trying to find ways to separate yourself from your opponent, it is important to take any step necessary to give yourself an edge over the opponent. We run Rick Torbett’s Read and React offensive system in our program and have enjoyed what it has brought to our players. The Read and React sets like the ball screen shooter lift can be tailored to get touches in specific areas of the floor.

One area where we as a staff felt like were falling short for our players was in a lack of set plays. We always know those times where we are going to need those quick hitters to get a quick bucket, but we wanted to avoid totally changing our system to just throw in a few quick hitters. What we decided to go with was sets using the principles of the Read and React.

What these sets did was allow us to get quick buckets using our offensive principles. But even if we did not need a quick bucket, it still got our players moving within our offensive parameters.

Read and React Sets: Ball Screen Shooter Lift

This play was inspired by watching the NCAA tournament a few years back. And we just applied Read and React principles to it. It is a simple ball screen look. However, while everyone is watching the ball screen action, you bring a shooter up on the backside behind the pick and roll. That player should get a good look at the basket.

read and react shooter

This Read and React set also begins with a 5-Out formation. The point guard, Player 1, initiates the action with a dribble-at move toward Player 5 on the wing. Player 2 keeps his defender spread wide by standing in the corner.

After Player 5 slips the dribble-at, Player 1 pull dribbles on the wing to bring Player 5 back for a ball screen.

The second action of this read and react set looks to get the shooter in motion. Player 1 utilizes the ball screen on the wing and attacks the lane. After setting the screen, Player 5 makes a hard roll to the basket.

read and react shooter

At this point, Player 2 completes the circle movement motion to lift on the wing.

Player 1 penetrates into the middle, with Player 5 occupying the defense with his roll. The defender for Player 2, the shooter in this read and react action, might help down if the defense tries to trap the ball handler.

After getting into the lane, Player 1 completes the throwback pass to Player 2 on the wing. This is a catch-and-shoot opportunity for Player 2.

The pick-and-roll action clears the backside along the wing for Player 2, who moves into the space following that action. This play can be run from either side of the floor, depending upon the set up of the defense and the hand preference of the driver.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Sets: 5-Out Attack

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Sets: 5-Out Attack

Read and React Sets: 5-Out Attack

In this ever changing world of trying to find ways to separate yourself from your opponent, it is important to take any step necessary to give yourself an edge over the opponent. We run Rick Torbett’s Read and React offensive system in our program and have enjoyed what it has brought to our players. The Read and React sets like the 5-Out Attack can be tailored to get touches in specific areas of the floor.

One area where we as a staff felt like were falling short for our players was in a lack of set plays. We always know those times where we are going to need those quick hitters to get a quick bucket, but we wanted to avoid totally changing our system to just throw in a few quick hitters. What we decided to go with was sets using the principles of the Read and React.

What these sets did was allow us to get quick buckets using our offensive principles. But even if we did not need a quick bucket, it still got our players moving within our offensive parameters.

Read and React Sets: 5-Out Attack

This Read and React 5-Out set gets the ball swinging side-to-side with lots of action to keep the defense occupied. If you have a player who is great at screening and slipping, this play will get them a look in the middle of the paint. If that look is not open, the ball ends up in the hands of a player who is great in a pick and roll look.

Read and React 5-Out

This Read and React set begins with a 5-Out formation. All five offensive players begin outside the three-point line to spread the defense out. This is effective against man-to-man defenses, particularly ones that like to deny passes and overplay.

Player 1 initiates the action with a pass to the wing. After the pass, Player 1 sets a weak side screen for Player 4. Once he’s set the screen, Player 1 cuts to the weak side corner as Player 3 fills up on the wing.

The second action for this set sees Player 2 center the ball with Player 4 at the top of the key. Once that pass is made, Player 5 and Player 1 both set pin screens on the perimeter. This action could create open looks for the shooters on the wing.

Read and React 5-Out

The next sequence of action involves Player 5 slipping the pin screen for a lay-up opportunity. Player 5 dives to the middle of the lane looking to post up his defender. Player 1, meanwhile, pops to the open space on the wing.

If those moves are covered by the defense, Player 4 passes to Player 1 then cuts away to screen for Player 2 in the corner. As Player 1 receives, Player 5 comes up the floor to set a ball screen.

This becomes a basic pick-and-roll action from the wing at this point. Player 1 can drive for a scoring opportunity or pass to a number of teammates. Player 2 will be shaping up on the wing, while Player 3 should do the same on the opposite side. The ball screener, Player 5, can roll while Player 4 sets up in the short corner.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Sets: Ball Screen Shooter Lift

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Sets: Dribble Handoff (DHO)

Read and React Sets: Dribble Handoff (DHO)

In this ever changing world of trying to find ways to separate yourself from your opponent, it is important to take any step necessary to give yourself an edge over the opponent. We run Rick Torbett’s Read and React offensive system in our program and have enjoyed what it has brought to our players. The Read and React sets like the Dribble Handoff can be tailored to get touches in specific areas of the floor.

One area where we as a staff felt like were falling short for our players was in a lack of set plays. We always know those times where we are going to need those quick hitters to get a quick bucket, but we wanted to avoid totally changing our system to just throw in a few quick hitters. What we decided to go with was sets using the principles of the Read and React.

What these sets did was allow us to get quick buckets using our offensive principles. But even if we did not need a quick bucket, it still got our players moving within our offensive parameters.

Read and React Sets: Dribble Handoff (DHO)

If you have a player that is a great downhill driver, this is the set for you! It gets every player on the court moving to confuse the defense. What’s more, this Read and React set allows that downhill player an opportunity to make a quick move/decision using the a dribble handoff. This move is also known as a “DHO.”

Read and React Dribble Handoff

This Read and React dribble handoff set begins with a 5-Out look. This spread formation forces the defense into help side coverage and creates multiple driving lanes.

The set starts with Player 1 making a pass to Player 4 on the wing. Once he initiates the action, Player 1 cuts to the weak side corner, away from his pass. As Player 1 makes his cut, Players 3 and 2 should fill up along the perimeter.

The second action in this set sees Player 4 center the ball to Player 3, then immediately sets a down screen for Player 5. This action occupies the defense on that side of the floor to set up the attacking action of this play.

Read and React Dribble Handoff

The attacking action of this Read and React set comes following a dribble handoff. Player 2 should be your team’s best creator using a ball screen. The movement of this set brought him to the wing and has opened the lane for a drive.

Player 3 initiates the dribble handoff move with a dribble-at toward the wing. Instead of cutting away from the ball, Player 2 receives the handoff and immediately works downhill to pressure the defense. At this point, both corners should be occupied by shooters. If Player 4 doesn’t have three-point range, he can slide up to the short corner. That move, though, could bring a help defender sooner.

As Player 2 attacks the lane, he can drive to the rim, kick out to shooters, or pull up for an elbow jumper.

Ideally, this 5-Out set involves your best shooters to space the floor. Player 2 should be your best decision maker with the ball. Also, this set can be run from either side of the floor to give the downhill driver access to their dominant hand.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Sets: 4-Out

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Sets: 4-Out, 1-In

Read and React Sets: 4-Out, 1-In

In this ever changing world of trying to find ways to separate yourself from your opponent, it is important to take any step necessary to give yourself an edge over the opponent. We run Rick Torbett’s Read and React offensive system in our program and have enjoyed what it has brought to our players. The Read and React sets like 4-Out can be tailored to get touches in specific areas of the floor.

One area where we as a staff felt like were falling short for our players was in a lack of set plays. We always know those times where we are going to need those quick hitters to get a quick bucket, but we wanted to avoid totally changing our system to just throw in a few quick hitters. What we decided to go with was sets using the principles of the Read and React.

What these sets did was allow us to get quick buckets using our offensive principles. But even if we did not need a quick bucket, it still got our players moving within our offensive parameters.

Read and React Sets: 4-Out, 1-In

This Read and React set is utilizing the 4-Out, 1-In look from the Read and React System. The set provides a player who’s good working off a ball screen to isolate on one side of the floor. 

Read and React 4-Out

For this Read and React 4-Out set, start with Player 4 on the inside. This puts your best post finisher, Player 5, in the corner to begin. Your point guard initiates the action with a pass to Player 2 in the corner. Player 2 should be your best pick-and-roll creator.

Once Player 1 makes the pass, he receives a back screen from Player 4 and makes a UCLA cut to the basket. As this happens, Player 5 sets a pin screen for Player 3 on the weak side. For Player 2, this first action can also be a catch-and-shoot opportunity.

The second action of this Read and React 4-Out set involves a ball screen. Most of the strong side has been cleared for this action to take place along the wing. Player 4 should pop to the corner or short corner once he’s set the screen. On the weak side, Player 1 sets a back screen for Player 5, to get the big man in post position.

Read and React 4-OuThe last sequence for this set leaves the decision-making to Player 2. After using the ball screen, Player 2 can attack the rim looking for a shot. Another option is kicking back to Player 4 in the corner or short corner.

As Player 2 drives, Player 3 should complete the Read and React Circle Movement into the weak side corner. That could be a clean look if the opposing defense shifted in help-side coverage.

Player 1 sets up on the wing for a catch-and-shoot opportunity, while Player 5 establishes post position on the weak side block. This set can be run from either side of the floor so that the driver uses his dominant hand on the take.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Sets: Post Finish

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Sets: Post Finish

Read and React Sets: Post Finish

In this ever changing world of trying to find ways to separate yourself from your opponent, it is important to take any step necessary to give yourself an edge over the opponent. We run Rick Torbett’s Read and React offensive system in our program and have enjoyed what it has brought to our players. The Read and React sets we use on offense can be tailored to get touches in specific areas of the floor.

One area where we as a staff felt like were falling short for our players was in a lack of set plays. We always know those times where we are going to need those quick hitters to get a quick bucket, but we wanted to avoid totally changing our system to just throw in a few quick hitters. What we decided to go with was sets using the principles of the Read and React.

What these sets did was allow us to get quick buckets using our offensive principles. But even if we did not need a quick bucket, it still got our players moving within our offensive parameters.

Read and React Sets: Post Finish

This one of the Read and React sets looks to get your best post player with an opportunity around the rim. Using specific ball movement and screening, the play creates space for a post finish. It helps when Player 1 in this diagram stands as a knockdown shooter. This keeps the opposing defense honest.

read and react sets

The play begins in a five-out set up. Player 1 drives hard to the wing at Player 4. This dribble-at move forces a basket cut by Player 4, who clears to the opposite corner. The other players behind 1 fill the empty spaces on the perimeter.

The next part of this set sees Player 1 pass to Player 2 in the corner. After making the pass, Player 1 cuts to the basket and touches the paint. Players 5, 3, and 4 must rotate to fill the empty spots on the perimeter.

read and react sets

Once the rotation happens, Player 1 reverse course and sets a back screen for Player 5. Player 2 can hit Player 5 with a leading pass as the post player makes the cut to the hoop. After setting the back screen, Player 1 should shape up for a jump shot.

On the weak side of the floor, another action takes place. Player 4 sets a pin screen for Player 3, who sets to shoot. Player 4 then flashes to the elbow. Should the post pass be defended, Player 2 has options: Player 1 for a three, a skip pass to Player 3, or an elbow entry for Player 4.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Basketball Drills: Laker Cut

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Basketball: Circle Movement Drills

Read and React Basketball: Circle Movement Drills

f you have listened to Steve’s podcasts with Rick Torbett, you will know that Coach Collins utilizes the Read and React offense. But before installing this offensive system for your team, you’ll need to develop the specific skills to help your players leverage scoring opportunities. These Read and React exercises, like the circle movement drills, layer these skills so your players can excel with this system.

The Read and React offense incorporates a specific concept known as Circle Movement. This action involves offensive players moving along the perimeter in reaction to a teammate’s dribble drive. Generally, the players move in a circle motion  in the direction of the drive. This creates additional space from help defenders and opens passing lanes for the offense.

Read and React: Circle Movement Drills Drive and Kick

Layering the motion and skills for the read and react offense remains an integral part of developing this system. The Circle Movement drills incorporate the specific cuts practiced in the Drift and Lift Drills.

Circle Movement Drills

The set up for this drill involves two offensive players against one defender. The ball begins at the top of the key with the ball handler. A shooter is set wide on the wing. The defender starts with the shooter.

Here, the ball handler begins his dribble drive attack, pressuring the lane. This forces the defender into a help-side position. As the defender slides over to help the penetration, the shooter completes the circle movement necessary for the read and react offense.

By drifting to the corner, the shooter creates a new angle for both the pass and the defensive recovery. This drill provides the shooters with a catch-and-shoot opportunity on the wing. The shooter should drift within their range. A corner three-pointer can be attempted, or a short corner jumper.

Circle Movement Drills

Coaches can add a defensive layer to this circle movement drill by making the help defender complete a hard close-out on the shooter.

The set up for this drill can be moved to different portions of the floor to practice different passing angles and drifts. Starting from the wing forces the shooter to slide from the top of the key to the opposite wing. Starting from the corner can create skip-pass opportunities.

Read and React: Circle Movement Drills Safety Valve

The next layer of these circle movement drills involves the safety valve. The perimeter rotation in the read and react offense sees each player adjust their positioning based on the dribble drive.

Circle Movement Drills

The strong side of the court sees the offensive players drift with the penetration drive. On the weak side of the court, the offense players lift into the empty spaces on the perimeter to keep the floor balanced. This lift also creates a safety valve for the dribbler should the initial drive-and-kick opportunity be covered up by the defense.

The set up for this drill uses three offensive players without any defenders. The ball handler starts at the top of the key, flanked by teammates on the wing. The driver begins his dribble penetration and watches the wing on the strong side drift to the corner. The wing on the opposite side should lift and fill at the top of the key.

The ball handler need to stop, reverse his momentum, and pass to the top of the key. This drill can incorporate ball fakes and provides a good opportunity to develop a guard’s footwork.

Circle Movement Drills

The drill provides a catch-and-shoot opportunity and can be run from multiple spaces on the floor. This drill can also incorporate two or more defenders to help create realistic game conditions.

Implementing Read and React

We utilize the Read and React in our program at Gibson Southern in Fort Branch, Indiana. We love the unpredictability and freedom it provides our players while still having certain rules for them to follow. The various layers in these drills are the same as Coach Torbett’s system. They can be easily implemented if you are running the Read and React system.

As all coaches know, it is important to prepare your athletes both mentally and physically for how to react in certain situations when games roll around. These drills simulate those situations in 3 or 4 player groups. We have implemented these drills with female basketball players from 5th grade all the way up to 12 grade.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Basketball: Drift and Lift Drills

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Basketball: Drift and Lift Drills

Read and React Basketball: Drift and Lift Drills

If you have listened to Steve’s podcasts with Rick Torbett, you will know that Coach Collins utilizes the Read and React offense. But before installing this offensive system for your team, you’ll need to develop the specific skills to help your players leverage scoring opportunities. These Read and React exercises, like the basketball drift and lift drills, layer these skills so your players can excel with this system.

The basketball drift and lift drills incorporates an action central to the Read and React offense known as Circle Movement. This action involves offensive players moving along the perimeter in reaction to a teammate’s dribble drive. Generally, the players move in a circle motion  in the direction of the drive. This creates additional space from help defenders and opens passing lanes for the offense.

Read and React Basketball: Drift and Lift Drills

basketball drift and lift drills

The first layer of these basketball drift and lift drills involves a coach standing in the lane with a line of shooters on the wing. Action for this drill begins with an entry pass to the coach from the wing. The offensive player then drifts from the wing to the corner. The drift motion here isn’t a sprint or a cut.

This drill provides a catch-and-shoot opportunity for the offensive players. Those players with three-point range can attempt their shots as corner threes. Other players can drift to the short corner for their shot attempts. This drill should work from both sides of the floor.

basketball drift and lift drills

The second layer of these basketball drift and lift drills practices another motion for the read and react offense. This drill starts with a line of offensive players in the corner. Again, the coach stands in the lane and receives an entry pass from an offensive player.

Once the player makes the entry pass, they lift to the next spot along the perimeter. This mimics the circle movement of the read and react offense. Each player performs a catch-and-shoot attempt here, based on their shooting range.

Implementing Read and React

We utilize the Read and React in our program at Gibson Southern in Fort Branch, Indiana. We love the unpredictability and freedom it provides our players while still having certain rules for them to follow. The various layers in these drills are the same as Coach Torbett’s system. They can be easily implemented if you are running the Read and React system.

As all coaches know, it is important to prepare your athletes both mentally and physically for how to react in certain situations when games roll around. These drills simulate those situations in 3 or 4 player groups. We have implemented these drills with female basketball players from 5th grade all the way up to 12 grade.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Basketball: Circle Movement Drills

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Basketball Drills: Dribble-At and Draft Drives

Read and React Basketball Drills: Dribble-At and Draft Drives

If you have listened to Steve’s podcasts with Rick Torbett, you will know that Coach Collins utilizes the Read and React offense. But before installing this offensive system for your team, you’ll need to develop the specific skills to help your players leverage scoring opportunities. These Read and React basketball drills, working on Dribble-At and Draft Drives, layer these skills so your players can excel with this system.

Read and React Basketball: Dribble-At Drills

The dribble-at drill develops a specific skill often associated with a read and react offense. It’s a combination of several integral skills. These include passing off the dribble, cutting, and finishing. This drill also provides insight for teams trying to understand the value of spacing the floor.

dribble-at drills

The first layer for these dribble-at drills starts with the ball at the top of the key. The finisher stands on the wing, guarded by a defender. Player 1 initiates the action of the drill by dribbling at the wing player.

As Player 1 approaches, the Player 2 makes a backdoor cut. Player 1 needs to hit the finisher with a leading bounce pass on the cut. The offensive players in this drill can be instructed to work on different finishes at or near the rim.

This layer of the dribble-at drills can be shifted to other positions in the half court. Moving the starting point for the drill provides the offense with different angles to work from and different finishing spots.

Read and React Basketball: Draft Drives

dribble-at drills
Another layer of the dribble-at drills incorporates an action known as the “draft” drive. In this action, the player with the ball drives to the basket behind a teammate that is cutting. The cutter takes the first help defender with them with his move. This action is called a “draft” drive because it mimics a race car drafting off another race car, which removes some of the air resistance. Here, the cutter removes some of the defensive resistance a driver might face.

The set up for this layer of the dribble-at drills moves the defender from the wing to the ball. Player 1 starts with the ball at the top of the key, with Player 2 spotted up wide.

The action starts with Player 1 dribbling at the wing. Player 2 still makes a backdoor as the ball approaches, but instead of passing to the cutter, Player 1 follows into the lane for a layup attempt. The defender should provide pressure on the layup attempt from behind. This drill can also shift to different sections in the half court to create different angles for the drive and finish.

Read and React Basketball: Layering Dribble-At Drills and Draft Drives

dribble-at drills

Bringing the two layers of these dribble-at drills together involves adding a third offensive player to the mix. In this setup, Player 1 starts at the top of the key and dribbles at Player 2 on the wing. Player 2 proceeds with a backdoor cut and Player 3 fills the open spot at the top. This cut-and-fill technique is a stable of the motion offense.

Once the ball is on the wing, Player 1 dribbles at Player 3, who makes a backdoor cut. Player 1 completes a draft drive trailing Player 3 into the lane. Player 3 clears to the corner. This drill can incorporate several different finishes, including layups, jump-stops, or kick-outs.

Implementing Read and React

We utilize the Read and React in our program at Gibson Southern in Fort Branch, Indiana. We love the unpredictability and freedom it provides our players while still having certain rules for them to follow. The various layers in these drills are the same as Coach Torbett’s system. They can be easily implemented if you are running the Read and React system.

As all coaches know, it is important to prepare your athletes both mentally and physically for how to react in certain situations when games roll around. These drills simulate those situations in 3 or 4 player groups. We have implemented these drills with female basketball players from 5th grade all the way up to 12 grade.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Basketball Drills: Laker Cut

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Basketball Drills: Laker Cut

Read and React Basketball Drills: Laker Cut

If you have listened to Steve’s podcasts with Rick Torbett, you will know that Coach Collins utilizes the Read and React offense. But before installing this offensive system for your team, you’ll need to develop the specific skills to help your players leverage scoring opportunities. These Read and React basketball drills, like the Laker Cut, layer these skills so your players can excel with this system.

We utilize the Read and React in our program at Gibson Southern in Fort Branch, Indiana. We love the unpredictability and freedom it provides our players while still having certain rules for them to follow. The various layers in these drills are the same as Coach Torbett’s system. They can be easily implemented if you are running the Read and React system.

As all coaches know, it is important to prepare your athletes both mentally and physically for how to react in certain situations when games roll around. These drills simulate those situations in 3 or 4 player groups. We have implemented these drills with female basketball players from 5th grade all the way up to 12 grade.

Read and React Basketball Drills: Laker Cut

A Laker Cut happens when a player on the wing or in the corner, passes to the low post. Following the pass, that player cuts toward the basketball either above or below their teammate on the block. The post player can then pass it back to the cutter at the basket. This move gets its name from the NBA’s Los Angeles Lakers, which used this action in their sets, particularly during the Showtime Lakers era.

The Laker cut embodies the popular offensive philosophy of always following a pass with a cut. Magic Johnson and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar helped popularize this action with their play in the 1980s. This movement is similar to a UCLA cut by taking advantage of a defender’s tendency to relax once their mark has passed the ball.

Laker Cut

This Read and React drill begins with a player on the wing, a player in the post, and a post defender.

The player on the wing enters the ball into the post then completes the Laker cut, this time through the elbow. Your post player then passes to the cutter for a layup attempt.

The player receiving the pass can work on different finishes in the lane. The shots might include a layup, a reverse finish, and a floater.

Laker Cut

The second variation of this Laker cut drill moves the defense to the wing. Here’s the set up has the defender on the ball initially, with the post player open underneath the basket.

Here, after making the pass, the player on the wing must make the Laker cut with a defender in front of him. The cutter can practice using a jab step for misdirection. Once again, this player can work on different finishes once they’ve received the pass in the lane.

A Laker cut works in the opposite way as a split cut. This happens the wing player passes into the low post then cuts away from the ball to set or receive another screen.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Basketball Drills: Pass/Cut, Fill, & Backdoor

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Basketball Drills: Pass/Cut, Fill, & Backdoor

Read and React Basketball Drills: Pass/Cut, Fill, & Backdoor

If you have listened to Steve’s podcasts with Rick Torbett, you will know that Coach Collins utilizes the Read and React offense. But before installing this offensive system for your team, you’ll need to develop the specific skills to help your players leverage scoring opportunities. These Read and React basketball drills layer these skills so your players can excel with this system.

We utilize the Read and React in our program at Gibson Southern in Fort Branch, Indiana. We love the unpredictability and freedom it provides our players while still having certain rules for them to follow. The various layers in these drills are the same as Coach Torbett’s system and can be easily implemented if you are running the Read and React system.

As all coaches know, it is important to prepare your athletes both mentally and physically for how to react in certain situations when games roll around and these drills simulate those situations in 3 or 4 player groups. We have implemented these drills with female basketball players from 5th grade all the way up to 12 grade.

Read and React Basketball Drills: Pass and Cut

Read and React Basketball DrillsFirst of the Read and React basketball drills is a basic pass and cut. This drill incorporates three players: a passer, a finisher, and a defender. The move amounts to a UCLA cut which can be incorporated into a number of different offensive sets.

The ball starts at the top of the key, where the finisher passes to the wing. After making the pass, the finisher makes the UCLA cut in front of the defender. As the finisher makes the cut, it’s important that they’re looking for the ball with their hand up.

The passer waits until the finisher breaks the “read line” (the three-point line in the Read and React system) before throwing the pass. This pass should lead the finisher to the hoop, allowing the finisher to just catch and attempt the layup in one move.

The rotation for this drill sees the passer go to defense, the defender go to finisher, and the finisher switch to passer. This drill can be reversed to other portions of the floor, including a cuts from the wings. You can also incorporate different finishes for the layup, like a left or right, jump-stop, or shot fakes.

Read and React Basketball Drills: Fill

Read and React Basketball Drills

The next sequence in the first layer of Read and React basketball drills involves the Fill. This exercise has the shooter/finisher cut to an open space on the floor to receive the pass. After making the catch, the shooter must read the defense and react before taking the correct shot. This motion is called a Flash in some offense sets.

The drill set up has a passer on one wing and the shooter starting on the opposite wing. The defender starts in help-side position. The shooter cut to the top of the key to receive the pass from the wing and reads the defender on the catch.

If the defender stays back, the shooter can take a catch-and-shoot opportunity if they are within their shooting range. If the defender is aggressive and gets to the Read Line, the shooter should complete a rip-and-go move. This momentum move brings the ball across their body quickly, allowing them to attack the lane and leverage the defenders momentum.

This drill can incorporate different finishes once the shooter is in the lane, including layups, floaters, or jump-stops. The drill can also shift to other spaces on the floor to create different driving lanes.

Read and React Basketball Drills: Backdoor

Read and React Basketball DrillsThe last sequence for this first layer of Read and React basketball drills incorporates a simple backdoor cut. This move allows the offensive player to leverage an aggressive defense to create scoring opportunities.

This drill begins with the passer at the top of the key and both the shooter and the defender in the corner. The shooter cuts up the floor looking for the pass. The defender denies the wing entry.

Once the defender gets above the Read Line (the three-point line), the shooter makes the backdoor cut. The passer can ball fake to the wing before making the pass on the cut. This should be a leading pass, and likely a bounce pass at that.

This drill, like the others, can incorporate different finishes for the shooter. You can use traditional strong side layups, reverse finishes, jump-stops, jump-stops with a shot fake and finish, or finish through a contact pad. This drill can also be run from a variety of positions on the floor.

 


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Basketball Drills: Dribble-At and Draft Drives

Resources:

 

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: UCLA Cut

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: UCLA Cut

The Read and React is a great basketball offense. The only issue I have come across in our time running it is it can be difficult to get points quickly out of it. I did some research and playing with the Read and React and utilized the principles of this basketball offense to create some set plays out of it, including one with a UCLA cut.

These should offer good opportunities to score quickly out of the look while the opposing team thinks you’re still just running your offense. Even if you don’t run Read and React, these looks could still be utilized as great set play options to get good movement and looks at the basket.

Read and React Basketball: UCLA Cut

Another look that has action happening on both sides of the court to keep everyone busy and involved. This read and react set incorporates some basketball staples like pick and roll action and a few UCLA screens.

read and react basketball UCLA

This set beings in a 4-out, 1-in alignment. Player 1 passed to the corner, then makes a UCLA cut off a back screen from Player 4. 1 should cut with his hand up, looking for a pass from 2. While this action takes place, Player 5 sets a pin screen for Player 3. If 1 isn’t open on the UCLA cut, 2 can look to skip the ball to 3 for an open look.

This read and react set continues when 4 sets a ball screen for 2. 4 fades to the corner while 2 attacks the lane. While the strong side pick and roll happens, 1 sets a back screen for 5. 

read and react basketball UCLAPlayer 2 should be a solid ball handler and decision maker, considering he’s the focal point of this set. As he attacks the lane, 2 should read the defense and react accordingly.

Player 2’s options include driving to the rim for a layup attempt or hitting 5 on the left block. Player 4’s on the wing and Player 3 should cut to the opposite corner. 1 clears to be an outlet if the defense covers each option.

This play is easily reversible for a right-handed drive.

 


Related: Read and React – 5-Out Post Look

Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep 1246 Running the Read and React Offense


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: 5-Out Post Look

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: 5-Out Post Look

The Read and React is a great basketball offensive system. The only issue I have come across in our time running it is it can be difficult to get points quickly out of it. I did some research and playing with the Read and React and utilized the principles of this basketball offense to create some set plays out of it.

These should offer good opportunities to score quickly out of the look while the opposing team thinks you’re still just running your offense. Even if you don’t run Read and React, these looks could still be utilized as great set play options to get good movement and looks at the basket.

Read and React Basketball Offense: 5-Out Post Look

If you have a very good post player or just someone that is good at finishing around the rim, this is a good look for them. It starts with a dribble-at to initiate the offense to clear out the right side a little bit. We have action happening on the weak side to keep everyone busy and hopefully get a good look for the 5 in the paint.

read and react basketball

This read and react play begins with your basketball team using a 5-out set. The point guard dribble hard at the wing toward Player 4, who cuts toward the basket. 4’s cut finishes in the opposite corner. As Player 1 fills the wing, Players 5 and 3 rotate up one spot along the perimeter.

From there, Player 1 makes a pass to Player 2 in the corner. Player 1 then cuts, calling for the ball as he does so. Players 5, 3, and 4 all rotate to fill the open spaces on the perimeter. Player 1 gets into the paint but stops his cut under the basket.

read and react basketball

1 reverses his course and sets a back screen for Player 5 on the wing. Player 5 makes his cut toward the basket. At this point, Player 2 can either hit 5 with a pass on the cut or wait for 5 to post up on the block.

On the weak side of this read and react play, the Player 4 sets a flare screen for Player 3 then cuts to the strong-side elbow. If Player 5’s cut was covered, Player 2 can throw a skip pass to Player 3. He can also clear the ball to Player 1 or hit Player 4 on the elbow. If Player 4 gets the ball, this set creates a high-low opportunity with Player 5.


Related: Read & React Offense – Pin Screens

Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep 1323. Read and React Offense with Rick Torbett


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: Pin Screens

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: Pin Screens

The Read and React is a great basketball offensive system. The only issue I have come across in our time running it is it can be difficult to get points quickly out of it. I did some research and playing with the Read and React and utilized the principles of this basketball offense to create some set plays out of it.

These should offer good opportunities to score quickly out of the look while the opposing team thinks you’re still just running your offense. Even if you don’t run Read and React, these looks could still be utilized as great set play options to get good movement and looks at the basket.

Read and React Basketball Offense: Pin Screens

This is a VERY quick set, especially if you need a quick 2-point basket. The player on the left wing will receive a pin screen and they’ll curl to the block. For this play to be most effective, the player setting the pin screen on the left wing needs to be a knockdown shooter.

read and react basketball offense

The initial action of this read and react basketball offense set play involves your two bigs setting pin screens for your wings. Of these two bigs, Player 4 should be a better outside shooter than Player 5. When setting these screens, Player 4’s back should face the corner while Player 5’s back faces the sideline. 

As the screens are set, Player 2 curls toward the basket. Player 3 fades to the corner. The first look for your point guard should be for the layup. If not, the second read is for the shooter in the corner.

read and react basketball offenseThe second phase of this read and react basketball set involves a series of cuts for the offense. If neither Player 2 nor Player 3 are open on the pin screens, Player 4 flares to the wing. Player 2 cuts to the corner, and Player 5 cuts to the basket.

Another option here would be a high-low action with Players 4 and 5. In that option, Player 2 and Player 5 make still make their cuts, but Player 4 remains at the elbow. Player 1 makes an entry pass to 4 and clears to the opposite wing.

Player 4 would then look down low for Player 5, who has ideally sealed his defender when he made his cut.


Related: Read and React Basketball Offense Series: UCLA Cut

Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep 1323. Read and React Offense with Rick Torbett


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Basketball Quick Hitter Series: Pistol Action

Basketball Quick Hitter Series: Pistol Action

Getting good looks at the basket remains the primary focus of most offenses. Although there’s value in developing intricate offensive sets, sometimes in a close basketball game, getting a quick hitter releases the pressure and allows your team to thrive. A good basketball playbook features a number of options across a variety of situations, and having a consistent quick hitter is an absolute must. Sometimes, getting your best basketball players going downhill toward the basket with a pistol action helps create easy looks.

This is especially true as a season winds down or teams begin their postseason tournaments. You’re team’s already been well-scouted at this point, and you may have matched up with your opponents more than once. So it’s important to keep your opponents on their toes with a fresh playbook. The tricky part remains how to add to our repertoire without providing an extra burden on our players.

Enter the Basketball Quick Hitter series. These simple sets afford any offense release valves that players learn in a matter of minutes.


Basketball Quick Hitter: Pistol Action Progression

The basketball pistol play refers to an early offense action between the point guard and a wing player, with a post player at the top of the arc. The two main Pistol options to start a play are a dribble handoff and a pick and roll. In the Pistol action, the offense attempts to catch the defense before it sets in hopes to find optimal mismatches or blown coverage by a lack of defensive rotation, which makes it one of the best basketball quick hitters.

basketball pistol action

The sequence of this play begins with your point guard hitting ahead quickly to the wing. From there, Player 1 follows his pass and sprints into a dribble handoff with Player 2. As this pistol action develops, Player 4 sets a screen for Player 3 on the weak side. 4 rolls to the basket while 3 slips to the corner.

Player 1 needs to sprint up the basketball court into this pistol action. Completing the dribble handoff creates the quick-hitter here, because 1 is now going downhill to the basket at full speed.

basketball pistol action

If the defense covers this initial pistol action, the secondary scoring option unfolds for your basketball team. Player 2 cuts off a flare screen from Player 5. Player 1 on the wing has two options at this point: a pass to Player 2, who will have either a shot or a drive.

After setting the flare screen, Player 5 dives toward the hoop, drawing the defense down with him. While all that action is going on, 4 and 3 can screen for each other on the weak side to keep the defense honest.


Related: Entry Play & Quick-Hitter Offense

Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep 97: Quick Hitter: Drills and Practice – Quick Hitter and Talking about Drills and Practice


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.