Benefits of the Flex Motion Offense

Benefits of the Flex Motion Offense

Welcome to our blog post all about the “Flex Motion Offense” – a dynamic and effective offensive scheme that can transform your team’s performance on the court. As a youth basketball coach, I understand the challenges of developing young players and creating cohesive, winning teams. That’s why I’m eager to share with you the numerous benefits of the Flex Motion Offense, which I believe can be a game-changer for your squad.

In this post, we’ll break down the fundamental concepts of the Flex Motion Offense, explore how it can improve your team’s ball movement, spacing, and decision-making, and discuss the valuable life skills that players can learn through this system. Whether you’re a seasoned coach looking to refresh your playbook or a newcomer searching for effective strategies, you’ll find valuable insights and practical tips to help your team reach new heights.

Introduction to the Flex Motion Offense

The flex offense is a 4-out, 1-in (four perimeter players with one inside man) motion type offense where all five players may become interchangeable throughout the possession. In order to run a successful flex motion, your players will need to be fundamentally sound in all areas of the game. They must have the ability to throw crisp passes, set solid screens, execute sharp cuts, and make mid-range jump shots.

Along with these skills, it is also extremely beneficial to have versatile, inside-out type players. These are player who can both post-up inside and shoot the basketball on the perimeter. While the flex offense is generally considered to be a jump-shooting offense, there are many post-up opportunities available for the team that favors an inside-oriented game.

The flex is also a great offense for teams that are currently competing at the middle school and high school level. This is because the flex is extremely simple in its most basic form. It can be taught and learned rather quickly. Many coaches also find that this offense offers them an opportunity to use basic motion concepts to teach their athletes the fundamentals of the game while still maintaining a level of offensive control.

Benefits to the Flex Motion Offense

  • Great offense for improving a player’s basic fundamental skills
  • All five players are interchangeable, forcing the other team’s defensive players to guard all areas of the court and all offensive positions
  • A true motion offense with only a few key principles, making it very easy to teach and learn
  • Has a myriad of sets and counter plays, making itan extremely fun half-court offense to coach
  • With its initial 4-out-1-in alignments, the flex transitions smoothly from any fast- breaking system.
  • One of the few offenses that can be equally successful against a man-to-man or a zone defense
  • Emphasis is on teaching rather than playing, which helps players improve more quickly
  • Provides the offense with multiple scoring opportunities
  • Excellent offense for teams lacking a true point guard or a true post player
  • Can be used as a delay-game offense and/or to control tempo throughout a game

flex offense
The Flex Motion Offense!

Don’t miss the latest sale offer from Coach Collins!

This incredibly useful tool has the opportunity to transform your team into a hard-to-defend offense! The easy to download PDF provides over 100 diagrams with detailed, in-depth instructions to easily teach this offense.

Contents includes: Basic Motion, Corner Options, Flex Offense vs Switching Defense, and Disguising the Flex Offense. What’s more, you’ll get access to Quick Hitters and Shooting Drills to incorporate into your next practice!

Make sure you check out Coach Collins’ latest sale item today!


Related: 10 Things to Know About the Run-and-Jump Press Defense


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

10 Things to Know About the Run-and-Jump Press Defense

10 Things to Know About the Run-and-Jump Press Defense

In the world of youth basketball coaching, few defensive strategies are as exhilarating and effective as the Run-and-Jump Press Defense. This high-octane approach not only ignites excitement on the court but also promises to bolster your team’s defensive prowess.

In this blog post, we’re delving deep into the heart of the Run-and-Jump Press Defense, breaking down the ten key insights every youth basketball coach should know. Whether you’re a seasoned coach eager to fine-tune your strategy or a newcomer looking to introduce your team to this exciting defensive tactic, this guide will equip you with the knowledge and tools needed to excel.

Join us as we unravel the secrets behind this dynamic defense, exploring its principles, execution, and how it can transform your youth basketball team into a relentless and cohesive defensive unit. With these ten essential insights, you’ll be better prepared to harness the full potential of the Run-and-Jump Press Defense and lead your team to defensive excellence.

10 Must-Know Truths About the Run-and-Jump Press Defense

After giving the above questions critical thought, you must now prepare yourself for the 10 truths about the Run-and-Jump press. These next ten statements are 100% cold, hard facts that you must accept if you hope to be successful in running this press. Failure to acknowledge these ten truths will be detrimental to your team’s overall success.

1. This defense was designed to be a high-risk, high-reward press in the backcourt while giving teams the flexibility to play both solid and percentage defense in the half court.

2. When used correctly, this press will dramatically increase the tempo of the game. However, just because it is an up-and-down style of play doesn’t mean you are conceding open shot attempts to your opponents.

3. As with any defense that is trying to create confusion and frantic energy by pressuring the ball, communication is KEY! All players, whether they are on the floor or on the bench, need to be communicating constantly throughout the course of the game.

4. There are so many different strategies concerning “when” a team should press, but perhaps the most common theory is that of only pressing after made baskets. While at first, this strategy might seem like a practical idea, it actually is not. Throughout the course of the season, there are going to be games where your team will struggle with shooting the ball. When that happens, your team is going to need extra possessions! However, if your team only presses after made field goals and free throws, and your players can’t buy a basket to save their lives, your press has already been defeated! YOU MUST PRESS ON BOTH MADE AND MISSED BASKETS!

5. If either you or your athletes are new to this system, you all must be patient!

6. On ANY “up” pass made by the offense, your defense must have a sprint mentality and get back to protect the paint.

7. Coaches and players all must fully believe in this system!

8. This press will, without a doubt, force conditioning to become an important factor in deciding the result of the game. Make sure your athletes get into great game shape!

9. When you are on the practice floor, all coaches and players must be physically and mentally ready to work. This system requires both physical and mental toughness.

10. When starting out, you must begin by building a foundation. Concentrate on only the basic concepts and team drills. Once players have proved to you and your staff that their ability to execute these drills is acceptable, then you can move on to more advanced techniques.


run-and-jump press

Run-and-Jump Press Defense Special!

Don’t miss out on Coach Collins’ latest offer on through TeachHoops.com!

With this deal, you’ll get instant access to a robust PDF resource that will take your defensive coaching to the next level.

43 pages of engaging content that will talk you through the entire process, from planning, to practice prep, and game usage. Drills and diagrams fill this resource from start to finish!

Make sure you check out Coach Collins’ latest sale item today!


Related: Benefits of the Run-and-Jump Press Defense


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1858 Zone and Pressure Defense Discussion


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Overview and Benefits of the Run-and-Jump Press

Overview and Benefits of the Run-and-Jump Press

In the world of youth basketball, where agility, teamwork, and strategic brilliance reign supreme, coaches are constantly in pursuit of game-changing defensive tactics. One such strategy that has gained recognition for its ability to disrupt opponents and ignite fast-break opportunities is the Run-and-Jump Press Defense. This high-energy defensive system has the potential to transform your youth basketball team into a formidable force on the court.

In this blog post, we will dive deep into the Run-and-Jump Press Defense. We’ll dissect its key principles, and the advantages it offers for developing athletes. Whether you’re an experienced coach looking to refine your defensive strategy or a novice coach eager to introduce your team to this dynamic approach, this guide will provide valuable insights and techniques to maximize your team’s potential.

Join us on this journey as we explore the dynamic world of the Run-and-Jump Press Defense. Get ready to revolutionize your coaching and empower your team with a defense that can change the course of any game!

Using the Run-and-Jump Press Defense

Because basketball is a two-team sport, it is an inevitable fact that you HAVE to play defense in the course of any game. Knowing that even the greatest offenses will struggle at some point this season, wouldn’t it be great to create some extra offensive opportunities and to generate points with your hard-working defensive system? The run-and-jump press can accomplish just that!

Whether you are a coach who already plays an aggressive, pressure-oriented man-to-man defense or a coach who is thinking about tweaking his defensive philosophy in order to produce offensive opportunities, the run-and-jump press is a great weapon to add to your coaching arsenal!

Man-to-man defense might be the most popular defense in today’s game. So, your players are probably already familiar with many of the building blocks of the Run-and-Jump Press. This is not a complicated or foreign concept. But rather one that incorporates the same man-to-man principles that your athletes have already been taught. This press merely organizes these principles into a pressing system that turns your athletes’ hard work into an endless number of scoring opportunities.

Teams of all ages can benefit from this defense. Specifically, programs that are playing at the high school varsity level and below (junior varsity, club or AAU, and middle school) can take special advantage of this pressing system. This is because teams at this level are generally not as skilled in terms of ball handling and decision-making as teams at higher levels of competition. Many of these younger teams are made of multiple-sport athletes. Those players cannot dedicate the time that is necessary to build the skill sets required to break this press. So, as a result, these teams usually only have one or two athletes who can adequately handle the basketball against physical and mental pressure.

Benefits of the Run-and-JumpPress

  • Increases the tempo of the game and disrupts your opponent’s offense
  • Creates turnovers and generates scoring opportunities
  • Gives your team “spurtability” so that you can score in bunches
  • Difficult for the opposing team to simulate and prepare for in practice
  • Eats up valuable practice time in opposing team practices
  • Allows a coach to play a lot of athletes, which is great for team morale
  • Makes conditioning a factor in every game
  • Uses familiarman-to-man defensive principles, which reduces teaching time
  • Easy to teach and even easier to learn, making it a great option for youth coaches

Run-and-Jump Press Defense Special!

run-and-jump pressDon’t miss out on Coach Collins’ latest offer on through TeachHoops.com!

With this deal, you’ll get instant access to a robust PDF resource that will take your defensive coaching to the next level.

43 pages of engaging content that will talk you through the entire process, from planning, to practice prep, and game usage. Drills and diagrams fill this resource from start to finish!

Make sure you check out Coach Collins’ latest sale item today!

 


Related: How to Run the 2-2-1 Press Defense


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1858 Zone and Pressure Defense Discussion


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

How to Run the Tempo 2-2-1 Press Defense

How to Run the Tempo 2-2-1 Press Defense

In the fast-paced world of youth basketball, coaches are seeking innovative strategies to gain an advantage. Enter the 2-2-1 press defense, a dynamic tactic revolutionizing the game. In this post, we’ll explore its fundamentals and highlight the incredible benefits it brings to young athletes.

Whether you’re an experienced coach or new to the game, this guide will equip you with the tools to disrupt opponents, create turnovers, and foster teamwork. Join us to unlock the power of the 2-2-1 press defense and elevate your coaching skills!

2-2-1 Press Defense Court Geography

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There are four areas that we are going to discuss. In order to run this press effectively and properly, you and your team must understand the importance of each area from the very beginning.

Spot 1

Without a doubt, the most important area of the court for this press is the middle of the floor. Once the offense enters the ball into the middle of the floor, your press is doomed. You must constantly and emphatically stress the importance of keeping the ball out of the middle and always force it down the sideline.

There are many definitions of “middle.” But when it comes to pressing, the middle of the floor is the space behind your top spot defenders and in the center of the court.

Spot 2

The second area of emphasis is the sideline. The entire effectiveness of the 2-2-1 press is determined by how well you can force the ball up the sideline, or alley, as some coaches like to call it.

By forcing the ball up the sideline, you are physically containing the ball-handler. And, more importantly, limiting his vision. Without court vision, even skilled point guards will have to surrender to your defense.

Spot 3

The third important area of the floor is the middle space directly in front of your top spot defenders. When the offense inbounds the ball against this press, more times than not the receiver will throw the ball back to the inbounder. It depends on whether the inbounder is also a ball-handler and whether you are pressing soft or hard.

There are some predetermined strategies you can employ. As long as the offense is merely using the inbounder to reverse the ball from side to side, you are in great shape.

Spot 4

The fourth and final important area on the court may also be the most crucial to the success of your press. It is called the retreat spot, and when the ball enters this designated area on the court, your team must immediately sprint and retreat into your half-court defense.

2-2-1 Press Defense Spot Responsibilities

In order to deploy the 2-2-1 press defense correctly, your players must know their responsibilities.

The Top “2”

The Top Spots of the press typically belong to the guards. We usually play our guards here for multiple reasons. Our guards are typically quicker and better as ball defenders. We want our top spots to be able to anticipate possible lob passes when denying, as well as to take charges when cutters break too hard. And the players in these spots will also need to defend both the ball and the middle of the court, which is something our guards are adept at.

As important as athletic ability is in our press, being coach able and possessing a high basketball I.Q. is even more important. The top spots will be much more effective if filled with intelligent players. In other words, thinking quickly is just as important as moving quickly! A skill that most players in today’s game lack is court awareness. Your top spot players must always know where they are in relation to the ball.

The Middle “2”

The Bluff Spots are the second layer of the zone press and are responsible for forming a trap with the top spot and stopping dribble penetration in the middle of the court. The bluff spot is the most underrated spot in the press. And so we usually play our forwards here for two main reasons.

First, since they are most often taller than our guards, they form a higher wall when setting the sideline trap and so can get more deflections. Second, since the weak side bluff spot will more than likely be the second defender back to protect the basket, we want a good rebounder in this position. The bluff spots let other players in the press feel confident that they have a powerful backup to stop runaway ball-handlers. This peace of mind lets the top spots play with complete freedom and the protector stay mentally and physically aggressive.

The Back “1”

Last but not least is the Protector. This is generally our tallest player, though we will also play someone here who is slightly smaller if he anticipates well and is a strong rebounder. It is crucial that this player be completely committed to protecting the basketand understands the importance of not gambling unnecessarily.

The protector will often be your last line of defense, and so if you don’t have an intelligent player occupying this spot, the opposing team may render your press totally ineffective.

 


The 2-2-1 Tempo Press Special!

Don’t miss out on Coach Collins’ latest offer on through TeachHoops.com!

With this deal, you’ll receive detailed breakdown of the most widely used full court press in the game of basketball. The instant and easy PDF download provides so much information. This includes Court Geography, Spot Responsibilities, Early Denial, and what to do Once the Ball is Inbounded.

All this and so much more! Check out Coach Collins’ latest sale item today!

 


Related: Overview and Benefits of the 2-2-1 Press


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1858 Zone and Pressure Defense Discussion


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Overview and Benefits of the 2-2-1 Press

Overview and Benefits of the 2-2-1 Press

In the fast-paced world of youth basketball, where every possession counts and every point matters, coaches are constantly on the lookout for strategies that can give their team the edge. One such strategy that has been gaining prominence in recent years is the 2-2-1 press defense. This dynamic and aggressive defensive tactic has revolutionized the way youth teams approach the game, offering a potent blend of pressure, teamwork, and tactical finesse.

Join us as we delve into the world of the 2-2-1 press defense, uncovering the advantages it offers in terms of disrupting opponents, creating turnovers, and fostering a culture of teamwork and tenacity among your youth basketball players. Get ready to elevate your coaching game and empower your team with a defense that can turn the tide of any game!

Overview of the 2-2-1 Press

The team that controls the tempo of the game will usually win the battle. And pressing is just one of many ways to control tempo. If you are already a pressing team, you probably already have a good understanding of the importance that tempo has in impacting the game.

A man-to-man press is a great tool for speeding up the game and forcing turnovers. Sometimes, when teams are under-skilled offensively in the half court. This is a vital component in their game plan, letting them use their hard-fought defense to create more shot attempts and easier buckets.

However, what do you do if you want to create the exact opposite effect? Instead of speeding up the game, what if you want to slow it down? Perhaps you want to limit the total number of possessions in the game. Or maybe you simply want to slow down an opponent that likes to run at every opportunity.

I strongly believe that, in order to slow down the tempo of the game, you must be patient on defense as well as on offense. This is where the 2-2-1, aka “Tempo,” zone press comes in handy.

The Tempo Press

The 2-2-1 press is called a tempo or containment press because it is just that: a tactic used to control and often slow down the tempo of a game. The compact formation of the zone forces offensive teams and their point guards to patiently advance the ball up the sideline. This is instead of attacking the middle of the floor. When the 2-2-1 is executed properly, it forces long reversal passes from side to side. This runs valuable time off the clock and therefore slows down the game.

This press is very unique when compared to other presses, such as a 1-2-1-1, a run and jump, or even a straight man-to-man press. This set allows teams to press effectively regardless of their speed and length. Or rather, their lack of speed and length. As you might have guessed by now, the whole key to running this “Tempo” press correctly and effectively is PATIENCE.

Unfortunately for many teams, regardless of the players’ ages and/or skill levels, patience and tempo are extremely difficult things to grasp. What makes them so hard to teach from a coaching standpoints that both tempo and patience are relatively complicated concepts to define. If you are going to use this press, you must teach your players how to consistently recognize the exact game tempo that you are striving to achieve.

Even though the primary premise of the 2-2-1 press is to keep the ball out of the middle and to force long reversal passes from side to side, with proper instruction and repetition, the 2-2-1 can evolve into a more aggressive trapping defense as well.

Benefits of the 2-2-1 Press

  • Can play it “soft” to slow the game down or “hard” to speed the game up
  • Considered to be a “safe” press because it does not give up many layups
  • Forces your opponents into mistakes and turnovers
  • Does not require extremely quick players to run effectively
  • Gives you a reason to condition during practice
  • Eliminates the chance of a fast break/transition game
  • Wears opponents down mentally and physically
  • Makes the opposing coach hesitant to substitute
  • Eats up opponents’ practice time since they have to prepare for pressure
  • Can be easily altered to fit your personnel
  • Builds team unity and team chemistry
  • Whether you want to slow the game down or speed it up in hopes of forcing a few turnovers, the 2-2-1 is a great tool to have in your arsenal for controlling the overall tempo of a game

The 2-2-1 Tempo Press Special!

Don’t miss out on Coach Collins’ latest offer on through TeachHoops.com!

With this deal, you’ll receive detailed breakdown of the most widely used full court press in the game of basketball. The instant and easy PDF download provides so much information. This includes Court Geography, Spot Responsibilities, Early Denial, and what to do Once the Ball is Inbounded.

All this and so much more! Check out Coach Collins’ latest sale item today!

 


Related: 7 Best Zone Busters to Use this Basketball Season


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1858 Zone and Pressure Defense Discussion


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Better Basketball: Motion Offense and the 5-Out Set

Better Basketball: Motion Offense and the 5-Out Set

Picture this: a team that moves like a well-choreographed dance, passing the ball seamlessly, creating open shots, and leaving the opposing defense scratching their heads. It’s not just a dream; it’s the power of the motion offense. And when we combine it with the 5-out alignment, something magical happens – the court opens up, opportunities multiply, and teamwork takes center stage.

Whether you’re a seasoned coach looking to fine-tune your strategy or a rookie coach eager to make a mark, mastering motion offense with the 5-out alignment is a game-changer. So, grab your clipboard, rally your team, and let’s delve into the magic of fluid movement, precision passing, and scoring galore.It’s time to take your coaching playbook to the next level and lead your team to victory through the art of motion offense and the 5-out alignment.

Motion Offense with the 5-Out Set

5-Out motion

For a motion offense, using the 5-Out set often provides the most space for your team.

The term “5-Out” references the fact that all offensive players on the floor are starting outside the three-point line. Typically, the setup features one player at the top, two on the wings, and two in the corners.

The 5 Out alignment can be a base for any motion offense. All five positions are interchangeable but can be set up to match locations with player skills.

This “position-less” offense relies on floor spacing and a set of basic movement that assist players to determine actions.

The basic concept for 5-Out Motion features an easy-to-understand set up: cut and replace. Each of the five spaces along the perimeter should be occupied by an offensive player.

When one player cuts, his teammates shift along the perimeter in corresponding fashion. If too many players end up on one side, the coach could call to “balance the floor” from the sideline.

5-out motion

A good way to start teaching 5-Out Motion on a pass is to have the passer cut to the basket with everyone rotating to replace the open slot. The only exception to this rule is a pass from the corner.


Related: Preparing for Youth Basketball Tryouts


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1831 How to Establish your Offense


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Youth Basketball End-of-Quarter Quick Hitter

Youth Basketball End-of-Quarter Quick Hitter

As a seasoned basketball coach with years of experience on the court, I firmly believe in the power of precise execution during critical moments. The end of each quarter presents a golden opportunity to make a significant impact on the game’s momentum, and that’s where this “End-of-Quarter Quick Hitter” comes into play.

In this post, I’ll be sharing valuable insights into this strategic offensive play, tailored specifically for youth basketball teams. Mastering the art of the end-of-quarter quick hitter can give your team the edge they need to finish quarters on a high note, gain momentum, and seize control of the game. So, let’s dive into the intricacies of this tactical gem and empower your young athletes with a game-changing tool that will elevate their performance to new heights.

End-of-Quarter Quick Hitter

basketball entry playsThis play begins with using the 1-4 High set.

1 starts with a dribble entry to the wing. As 1 makes his way to the wing, 2 imitates a zipper or loop cut.

2 cuts down and loops around 5, who provides the down screen.

As that action is taking place, 3 cuts to the corner as a decoy action.

This initial action might get an open look for 2 at the top of the key.

Any defensive overplay might result in a dump down pass to 5 for a layup.

basketball entry plays

3 pops up from the corner to receive a pass on the wing.

1, meanwhile, cuts from the opposite wing to the strong side corner. He cuts along the baseline, receiving a screen from 4 at the block to free him.

2 reverses the ball to 3 on the wing. Once that pass has happened, 5 provides a flare screen for 2.

This action might get an open shot for 3. It might also get an open shot for 1 in the corner, or 4 on the block.

 

basketball entry plays

The final sequence of this play sees 3 make the decisions. He might be open, or 1 in the corner, or 4 on the block.

3 can also skip pass to 2, whose flair screen might see him open on the opposite side. Depending on how the defense plays it, 5 might slip the screen for an open layup as well.

The value of a play like this one remains the pressure-release aspect. If a defense overplays or denies certain passes, preventing a team from initiating a continuity offense, then a set like this one provides a useful counter attack.

 


Related: 7 Reasons to Practice End-of-Game Situations


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

5 Questions to Ask Before Basketball End-of-Game Scenarios

5 Questions to Ask Before Basketball End-of-Game Scenarios

As a veteran coach with years of experience on the basketball court, I firmly believe that preparation is key to success in any sport. As Benjamin Franklin famously said: “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” When it comes to basketball, there’s one aspect that often separates the winners from the losers—the ability to navigate and excel in basketball end-of-game scenarios.

These critical moments can make or break a team’s chances of victory, and as coaches of youth basketball teams, it’s our responsibility to ensure our players are well-equipped to handle the pressure and make the right decisions. In this post, we’ll explore five essential questions every coach should ask before diving into those nail-biting, adrenaline-pumping end-of-game situations. By addressing these questions, we can empower our young athletes to face these moments with confidence, poise, and a strategic mindset, ultimately increasing their chances of triumph. So, let’s dive in and unlock the secrets to mastering basketball end-of-game scenarios!

Basketball End-of-Game Scenarios: 5 Questions to Answer

As a coach, you and your staff need to know the answers to the following questions ahead of any basketball season to prep for those end-of-game scenarios.

Question 1: Should you foul or go for a steal/turnover if your team is behind? If fouling, whom and when?

Rationale: This question addresses the strategy of whether to intentionally foul the opposing team to stop the clock and extend the game or to go for a steal or turnover to regain possession quickly.

Possible Answers: It depends on the time remaining, the score difference, and the defensive capabilities of your team. If there is sufficient time, fouling the opponent’s weakest free-throw shooter or the player with the ball can increase your team’s chances of getting the ball back. However, if your team excels at creating turnovers, going for a steal or trap might be a viable option.

Question 2: Should you foul when your team is up by 3 points to avoid a potential 3-pointer? If so, when?

Rationale: This question addresses the decision of whether to foul the opponent intentionally to prevent them from attempting a game-tying 3-pointer.

Possible Answers: It depends on the time remaining, the defensive capabilities of your team, and the likelihood of the opponent making a 3-pointer. Foul only when the opposing team is attempting a 3-pointer, ideally before the shot is released, to prevent them from tying the game.

Question 3: What should your team do after getting a rebound/turnover or after a made shot? Should you call an immediate timeout, push the ball up and call a timeout, or disregard the timeout and go for a score?

Rationale: This question addresses the decision of whether to call a timeout immediately, push the ball up the court and then call a timeout, or play through without a timeout to capitalize on the momentum.

Possible Answers: It depends on the game situation, time remaining, and the need for a strategic adjustment. If your team needs to regroup, set up a play, or make substitutions, calling an immediate timeout might be appropriate. However, if there’s an opportunity for a quick score in transition, pushing the ball up the court and then calling a timeout can catch the defense off guard. In some cases, if the flow of the game is favorable and momentum is on your team’s side, it might be best to let the players play and go for a score without using a timeout.

Question 4: Should your team hold for the last shot or take the first good scoring opportunity when trailing by 1, 2, or tied?

Rationale: This question explores the strategy of whether to be patient and hold the ball for the last shot to ensure your team has the final possession or to take the first good scoring opportunity available.

Possible Answers: It depends on the time remaining, the offensive strengths of your team, and the quality of the available shot. If time allows, it might be wise to run a well-executed play and look for the best possible shot rather than rushing. However, if there’s a clear and open opportunity early in the possession, taking the shot might be a suitable option.

Question 5: Do you have plays prepared for various locations on the court, considering the time left in the game?

Rationale: This question emphasizes the importance of having well-rehearsed plays from different areas of the court, taking into account the time remaining in the game.

Possible Answers: Yes, it is crucial to have a variety of plays designed for different scenarios, such as sideline inbounds, baseline inbounds, and half-court sets. These plays should consider the time remaining and provide options for quick scores, perimeter shots, or set plays to exploit defensive weaknesses. Having a diverse playbook allows your team to adjust and execute effectively, regardless of the location and time left on the clock.

 

 

Related: Youth Basketball End of Game Situations


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Youth Basketball End of Game Situations

Youth Basketball End of Game Situations

Basketball End of Game situations refer to the specific scenarios and strategies that teams employ in the closing moments of a basketball game when the score is close and every possession becomes critical. These situations typically involve various tactics aimed at maximizing scoring opportunities, managing the clock, and maintaining or gaining a competitive advantage.

It’s important to note that end-of-game situations can vary depending on the specific rules and regulations of different basketball leagues and organizations. Coaches and players often develop unique strategies and adjustments based on their team’s strengths, the opponent’s weaknesses, and the game’s context.

Here’s a look at seven elements basketball coaches should consider when dealing with End of Game situations.

7 Elements to Consider During Basketball End of Game Situations

  1. Game-Winning/Go-Ahead Possession: When a team is trailing by a small margin or tied, they have the opportunity to execute a play to score and take the lead or win the game.
  2. Clock Management: Teams need to be mindful of the game clock and shot clock in order to maximize their possessions and prevent the opposing team from having enough time for a comeback. This may involve intentionally fouling to stop the clock, strategic timeouts, or using quick fouls to send the opponent to the free-throw line and conserve time.
  3. Free-Throw Strategies: Depending on the score and time remaining, teams may employ different strategies when shooting free throws or defending against them. This can include intentionally missing a free throw to create an opportunity for an offensive rebound or committing intentional fouls to prevent the opposing team from attempting a potential game-tying or game-winning shot.
  4. Inbound Plays: Out-of-bounds situations, especially when the offensive team is near their basket with limited time, require well-designed plays to create open scoring opportunities. These plays often involve screens, cuts, and decoy movements to confuse the defense.
  5. Three-Point Shooting: With the increased value of three-pointers, teams may strategically seek three-point shots to quickly close a scoring gap or take the lead.
  6. Defensive Strategies: Teams may employ specific defensive strategies, such as full-court pressure, double-teaming star players, or denying certain passes, to disrupt the opposing team’s offensive flow and force turnovers.
  7. Overtime Strategies: When a game is tied at the end of regulation, teams enter an overtime period with additional time to determine the winner. Overtime basketball strategies are similar to end of game situations, but teams need to adapt and adjust their approach based on the game’s flow and player fouls.

Prepping for Basketball End of Game Situations

Preparing for end of game situations are crucial for basketball coaches at any level. Often times, however, this remains overlooked when developing their practice plans. Coaches continually drill aspects of an offensive set or a defensive approach, but sometimes forget those end-of-game scenarios.

Competitive practice games stand as one useful tool. These drills inject energy into practice that’s usually reserved for game nights. Competitive games, especially ones where the losing team feels the consequences, allow coaches to bring a high-level of energy to the practice floor.

Another thing basketball coaches should consider is developing specific in-practice scenarios to prepare for those end of game situations. These scenarios might play out during a controlled scrimmage. But adding specific elements like time and score will aid in that preparation. Something like, asking a team to hold a single-digit lead for three minutes. Or maybe the “best” player is not available due to foul trouble. Options are only limited by the coach’s creativity.

Check out the YouTube link below for a specific discussion between coaches on how to deal with end of game situations. In this segment, coaches use real game footage to talk through the options available.


Related: Defensive Drills and Rebounding Techniques


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Better Basketball: 6 Steps to Teach any Skill, Play, or Offense

Better Basketball: 6 Steps to Teach any Skill, Play, or Offense

Welcome to our guide on teaching offensive skills, plays, and offenses for better basketball performance. In this article, we present six progressive steps designed to enhance your coaching approach and help your players play better basketball on the court.

By following these steps, you’ll be able to introduce new skills effectively, ensure proper execution, increase speed, incorporate teamwork, integrate defensive elements, and ultimately apply the learned techniques in real-game situations. Whether you’re a seasoned coach or just starting out, this guide will provide you with a solid framework to teach and improve offensive skills, contributing to overall better basketball performance. Let’s dive in!

6 Steps to Teach any Offensive Skill, Play, or Offense for Better Basketball

It’s often been said that basketball is the most over coached and under taught sport on the planet. In order to help change that, here are six progressive steps that can be used to teach any offensive skill, play, or offense.

  1. Introduce the Skill or Play

  • Start by introducing the specific offensive skill, play, or offense to the players.
  • Demonstrate the movements, positioning, and timing involved.
  • Use a coach or experienced player to demonstrate the skill correctly.
  • Alternatively, utilize a video clip that clearly shows the desired execution.
  • Help players form a mental picture of the skill or play being executed perfectly.
  1. Execute the Skill at a Slow Pace

  • Allow players to start executing the skill at a slow pace.
  • Ensure that all players have the opportunity to master the required techniques and mechanics.
  • Pay close attention to footwork, which often determines the success of a skill.
  1. Increase Execution Speed

  • Transition to executing the skill at game speed.
  • Focus on executing quicker and quicker.
  • Use highly specific and well-designed breakdown drills to accomplish this.
  • Simplify the drills to minimize overthinking and maximize execution speed.
  1. Repeat and Practice

  • For individual skills, emphasize repetition, repetition, and repetition.
  • For plays or offenses, combine multiple parts and involve more teammates.
  • Develop mental and physical quickness, teamwork, and coordination.
  • Example: Add the “picker” when teaching the pick and roll instead of driving around a stationary cone.
  1. Add Defensive Elements

  • Introduce defense to make the learning process more enjoyable.
  • Avoid skipping the previous steps and going directly to this one.
  • Focus on executing all the individual parts while reading defensive reactions.
  1. Apply in Game Situations

  • Incorporate the newly learned skill, play, or offense into actual game scenarios.
  • Utilize five-on-five situations to create a game-like environment.
  • Avoid overlooking or taking this step for granted.
  • Address any difficulties in carrying skills and actions from drills to game situations.

Remember to periodically review the steps even after progressing through all six. Continual improvement is always possible, regardless of skill level.


Related: 5 Skill Development Ideas


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1759 Five Skill Every Player Should Work on During the Summer


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Better Basketball: Point Motion Sets

Better Basketball: Point Motion Sets

There are a variety of different basketball sets that a coach can run. Some like the 1-4 high looks, some like Box sets, and some like to change it up through all their sets. If a coach has been leading a team for any length of time, they have tried a variety of different set options. Some coaches change them from year to year. This article is going to be looking at three different Point Motion basketball sets that a coach could implement with their team.

We implemented these sets last season for a few reasons. First of all, we had 2-3 players who were really strong with the ball in their hands and going downhill. These sets got our best players in positions where they and our team could be successful.

Second, it clears the lane up for those players to drive. Third, it allowed us to put players who may not be the best ball handlers but are good shooters, defenders, or valuable in other roles for us and keep the ball out of their hands as these drives.

Lastly, we had a solid 5 who could play on the perimeter, shoot the ball a little, and drive to the basket as needed. As you will see in these sets, it helped having a skilled 5 who could do a variety of different things of things on the court. The 3 sets are described in detail below.

Basketball Offense: Point Motion Away

Point Motion Away allows any basketball coach to get a great cutter cutting to the basket and looking to make plays off the catch. This is a really good action if you have a player is great at the LeBron-Catch-and-Go idea that you are starting to see make the waves on attacks.

If the cutter isn’t open, the 1 could be open on a screen and pop or the 5 could do some dribble handoff actions on the strong side of the court.

Point Motion Away

Basketball Offense: Point Motion Middle

This is a great set if you have a guard (especially a 1) who is a skilled post player. It starts with the 5 flashing and the 1 going into the lane for a cut/post opportunity. If that  is not open, it continues with a down screen for the 1 to the corner and the screener could slip.

If neither of those are open, the play wraps up with a dribble handoff with 1 going downhill. The 5 needs to be able to be adaptable to many situations in this set.

Point Motion Middle

Basketball Offense: Point Motion Over

This is quite possibly the most simple of the sets. This is a great opportunity to get the ball into your 1‘s hands. It gets them going downhill and make reads. They could go to the basket or hit a corner shooter for a 3.

A counter to this play would be the 5 keeping the ball and spinning and going opposite. This is a great example of why you need a 5 the opposing team needs to respect because if they don’t the lane will be clogged for the 1.

Point Motion Over

 


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: 10 Tips for Communicating Effectively


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1720 Coaching Youth Hoops


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Low Post Moves for Big Men to Master

Low Post Moves for Big Men to Master

Although the modern game of basketball has drifted away from the low block, getting points from the post can still make the difference between winning and losing. While once upon a time, a basketball big man patrolled the paint on offense with his back to the basket, nowadays must develop a more well-rounded game. That said, having a variety of low post moves will help any developing big man in today’s game.

Where’s the Low Post?

Basketball court area namesThe low post area of a basketball court is the section of the painted area nearest to the basket. This stretch features a rectangular block to designate the spot and remains a vital piece of real estate on the court.

The low post stands in contrast to the mid-post, a section middle of the way between the low block and the free throw line, and the high post, which is situated near the free throw line.

Players that occupy the low post often try to pin their defender to their back before receiving a pass. This area makes for prime rebounding position, and when open, provides the highest percentage shots on the basketball court.

Although the modern game has pushed low post players away from the basket, being able to effectively score from this section of the court can often tilt control of the game. These players need to have a variety of low post moves to lean on when trying to score from the block.

Low Post Moves: Baby Hook

Perhaps the most important low post move for young big men to add to their bag is the baby hook. This simple and effective shot leverages the offensive player’s position near the hoop to get up a quality shot. By turning half way, the offensive player creates space from his defender along the length of his body. From there, the offensive player uses one hand to take this shot attempt over his defender.

This low post move requires a wide stance and a solid base to operate from. If the defender is on the offensive player’s back, a shoulder fake one way or the other should create an opening to attack. From there, the offensive player should turn his shoulders parallel to the hoop, with the ball away from the defender. The offensive player then brings the ball up vertically with one hand and executes the shot attempt with a quick snap of the wrist.

The baby hook is a simplified version of the traditional sky hook, a far more difficult move for low post players to master.

Low Post Moves: Drop Step

Another one of the low post moves every big man should have in his bag is the drop step. This simple maneuver leverages a defender’s position on the floor to create space right at the rim for a layup. The offensive player dribbles with his back to the defender after receiving the ball. Once physical contact is made with the defender’s body, the offensive player uses a shoulder fake to position the defender near his pivot foot. From there, the offensive player uses his other leg to wrap around the defender’s foot and “drop” toward the basket.

This move pushes the defender aside, creating an opening for a layup right at the rim. It must be timed correctly to avoid a charging call or to prevent the defender from getting a clean block. Using the dribble to set up the defender, the best drop step progresses the offensive player toward the baseline. Once the spin is made, the offensive player uses his own body to protect the ball from the defender during the shot attempt.

Low Post Moves: Up-and-Under

The up-and-under stands out as an effective set of low post moves that can also create fouls on opposing defenders. This move works particularly well once the offensive player has made a couple of baby hooks. The “up” portion of the up-and-under looks like a hook shot, inducing the defender’s reaction. The “under” takes place when the offensive player steps through while the defender is out of position.

To execute this move, the offensive player should once again start with a wide stance. From there, the offensive players should behave as if he intends to shoot a baby hook. As he moves into a two-foot position after picking up his dribble, the offensive player then performs a ball fake to get the defender to jump. Once the defender is up in the air, the offensive player performs a step-through underneath, getting an open look at the rim.


Related: Box Set Series: Box Set Offense for Low-Post Look

 



Coach Unplugged Podcast: 

Youth Player Development

Ep: 393 Big Men and Switching Defense


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Setting Up a Basketball Playbook

Setting Up a Basketball Playbook

Heading into a new season, basketball coaches juggle a number of important responsibilities. Hopefully, coaches used the offseason to better themselves in preparation for the new year. But no matter what level a coach find him or herself coaching at, setting up the right basketball playbook for the team remains an integral step.

Coaches can use the offseason to accomplish several different goals, including becoming a better leader. Often times, evaluating last season’s performance comes at this point, as well as fine tuning the approach to practice planning. But setting up the team’s playbook should also be an important exercise.

Keys to a Good Basketball Playbook

A playbook crystalizes a team’s offensive and defensive approach. It helps build the team’s identity and provides a path to in-season success. Laying out the different sets and plays before hand can often help with drill selection and practice flow. Coaches seek to teach these sets and plays in order to leverage a team’s strengths, both from an individual and a collective perspective.

Any good basketball playbook relies on two relatively broad offensive categories. Those categories are: Man-to-Man Offense, Zone Offense and Specials.

  • Man-to-Man Offense: Teams execute these plays against man-to-man defenses, where each defensive player guards one offensive player. These plays aim to create opportunities for offensive players with staples such as the use of pick-and-rolls.
  • Zone Offense: Teams execute these plays against zone defenses, where defenders patrol specific areas in the half court rather than matchup one-on-one. These plays seek to leverage space, movement, and mismatches to create scoring opportunities.
  • Specials: Specials are those plays designed for specific situations in a given game. The most common offensive specials include Baseline Out of Bounds (BLOB) plays, Sideline Out of Bounds (SLOB) plays, and Press Breakers.

Fundamental Actions in a Good Basketball Playbook

Any basketball coach, no matter the level, should implement fundamental actions into their playbook. These actions often create the foundations for more complex plays and sets in a given offensive strategy. These actions should be incorporated in even the simplest youth basketball playbook.

  • Pick and Roll: The pick-and-roll remains the most recognizable offensive action at any level of basketball. In this action, an offensive player sets a screen (or pick) for the ball handler. The ball-handler reads the defense before deciding his or her next move, either driving to the basket or making a pass. The screener in this action rolls to the hoop and prepares to receive a pass, whether that pass is coming or not. This action remains a staple of any man-to-man offense.
  • Pass and Cut: Pass and cut is an offensive tactic in which a perimeter player with the ball passes to a teammate then executes a cut, typically towards the hoop. This basic action looks to draw attention from the defense and limit rotations or overplays. The pass and cut approach works for both man-to-man offenses and zone offenses.
  • Ball Reversal: The ball reversal action in basketball involves an offense working the ball via pass from one side of the court to the other. When executed properly, this action forces a defense to scramble and can create openings for cutting lanes or jump shots. This action can work against either defensive setup, but it is most effective against aggressive zone defenses.

Tips for Building a Basketball Playbook

No basketball playbook is created equal. Coaches should assess the skill level of their players before making definitive choices for their offensive approach. There’s such a wide variety of plays that coaches can certainly find something that will work for their team. But when building a playbook, youth basketball coaches should consider the following three tips.

  1. Start Simple. This is particularly true if a coach is dealing with newcomers to the sport or relatively inexperienced youth teams. Players will perform all the better as beginners when they aren’t too slowed by thinking about the next action in a play. Layering skills and actions in practice can often set up more complex plays later in the season.
  2. Embrace Space. One of the key skills young players need to develop is being able to move without the ball. Using the full court for drills and conditioning is a must for coaches, especially at the youth level. When designing a playbook, getting players to understand spacing will improve the effectiveness of each set. This is especially true against zone defenses.
  3. Add Variety. Experienced basketball coaches sport deep playbooks, pulling sets to combat specific defenses. Newer basketball coaches need to remember that incorporating a variety of plays into the playbook will help keep players engaged and prevent opponents from keying on tendencies. Avoid becoming predictable at all costs.

Click HERE for a TeachHoops Playbook Template. 


 


Related: 3 Effective Full Court Basketball Drills


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast: 

Youth Player Development

Ep 1356 10 Keys to A Good Zone Offense

Ep 1318 Picking an Offense and Full Court Pressure Discussion


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

3 Go-To Baseline Out of Bounds Plays

3 Go-To Baseline Out of Bounds Plays

No basketball coach’s playbook is ever complete without a go-to baseline out of bounds play. Sometimes referred to as a BLOB, the baseline out of bounds play serves as a scoring opportunity for most teams. These plays are often quick-hitters with multiple options for the passer.

Coaches can be as creative as they want to be when designing these plays, but they have to keep in mind the skill-level of their team. Another consideration is being able to shift directly into the team’s core offense. Finally, some coaches prefer to install baseline out of bounds sets that have multiple variations from which to attack the basket.

Every coach needs go-to out of bounds sets heading into a season. Here’s a look at three effective baseline out of bounds plays.

Baseline Out of Bounds Plays: Box

baseline out of bounds playsThe first set to consider of these baseline out of bounds plays is called box. This play remains most effective against man-to-man defenses. For this play, the inbound should be your best passer.

Your best shooter should set up on the low block away from the passer, while your best wing finisher takes the opposite high post spot. Your two bigs create the other side of the box, with Player 5 on the low block and Player 4 on the strong-side elbow.

The first action of this play sends the shooter up to the opposite elbow to set a back screen for Player 3. After cutting down toward the basket, Player 3 should clear to the corner if he doesn’t receive a pass.

While this action unfolds, Player 5 slides up the court to set either a double screen or an elevator screen with Player 4.

After setting the back screen for Player 3, the shooter, Player 2 in this graphic, uses the strong side screens. Depending upon the movement of the defense, Player 2 can wrap around the bigs as a double screen or pass between them as an elevator screen. Player 2 clears to the corner and could be open for a three-point attempt.

The final action of this baseline out of bounds play involves the two bigs cutting to the low blocks. Player 3 can cut high as an outlet if need be.

Baseline Out of Bounds Plays: High Double Stack

baseline out of bounds playsThe next option among these baseline out of bounds plays is called High Double Stack. This play is best used against a 2-3 zone that’s trying to protect the interior of the lane.

The setup for this play stacks Players 5 and 2 at the strong-side elbow, while Players 4 and 3 stack on the opposite elbow. The inbounder should be your best passer.

The first action of this play involves a series of cuts. Player 2 cuts across the free throw line to screen for Player 3. As Player 3 uses the screen and curls along the three-point line, Player 5 makes a dive cut to the hoop.

After setting a cross-screen, Player 2 squares up at the top of the key. Player 4 flares out to the opposite wing as a potential outlet. The cut for Player 3 sees him progress all the way to the strong-side corner.

 

Baseline Out of Bounds Plays: Side Box

baseline out of bounds playsThe last set from these baseline out of bounds plays is called Side Box. This play is most effective against a 2-3 zone defense. The setup for this play utilizes an offset box.

Player 5 and Player 4 set up  several steps outside the lane line, about halfway between the lane and the three-point arc. Player 2 and Player 3 set up their side of the box in the middle of the lane.

The design for this play is to get an open look at a three-point attempt. Player 2 should be your team’s best shooter. He will be the primary option for this set.

The action begins with Player 4 and Player 5 setting an elevator screen on the side of the zone. Player 2 progresses through the elevator screen and exits high on the wing. The inbounder should look to pass Player 2 the ball.

Player 3 should set a down screen on the zone to create space for Player 4 to relocate to the top of the key.

After making the pass to Player 2, the inbounder should enter toward the strong-side corner, looking to receive the ball back for a shot if open. Player 2 can take the three if open.

Get More Out of Bounds Plays and Diagrams Here!

Click HERE for a TeachHoops Playbook Template. 


 


Related: 3 Effective Full Court Basketball Drills


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast: 

Youth Player Development

Ep 217: Out of Bounds Plays (High School Hoops)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Sets: Ball Screen Shooter Lift

Read and React Sets: Ball Screen Shooter Lift

In this ever changing world of trying to find ways to separate yourself from your opponent, it is important to take any step necessary to give yourself an edge over the opponent. We run Rick Torbett’s Read and React offensive system in our program and have enjoyed what it has brought to our players. The Read and React sets like the ball screen shooter lift can be tailored to get touches in specific areas of the floor.

One area where we as a staff felt like were falling short for our players was in a lack of set plays. We always know those times where we are going to need those quick hitters to get a quick bucket, but we wanted to avoid totally changing our system to just throw in a few quick hitters. What we decided to go with was sets using the principles of the Read and React.

What these sets did was allow us to get quick buckets using our offensive principles. But even if we did not need a quick bucket, it still got our players moving within our offensive parameters.

Read and React Sets: Ball Screen Shooter Lift

This play was inspired by watching the NCAA tournament a few years back. And we just applied Read and React principles to it. It is a simple ball screen look. However, while everyone is watching the ball screen action, you bring a shooter up on the backside behind the pick and roll. That player should get a good look at the basket.

read and react shooter

This Read and React set also begins with a 5-Out formation. The point guard, Player 1, initiates the action with a dribble-at move toward Player 5 on the wing. Player 2 keeps his defender spread wide by standing in the corner.

After Player 5 slips the dribble-at, Player 1 pull dribbles on the wing to bring Player 5 back for a ball screen.

The second action of this read and react set looks to get the shooter in motion. Player 1 utilizes the ball screen on the wing and attacks the lane. After setting the screen, Player 5 makes a hard roll to the basket.

read and react shooter

At this point, Player 2 completes the circle movement motion to lift on the wing.

Player 1 penetrates into the middle, with Player 5 occupying the defense with his roll. The defender for Player 2, the shooter in this read and react action, might help down if the defense tries to trap the ball handler.

After getting into the lane, Player 1 completes the throwback pass to Player 2 on the wing. This is a catch-and-shoot opportunity for Player 2.

The pick-and-roll action clears the backside along the wing for Player 2, who moves into the space following that action. This play can be run from either side of the floor, depending upon the set up of the defense and the hand preference of the driver.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Sets: 5-Out Attack

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Sets: 5-Out Attack

Read and React Sets: 5-Out Attack

In this ever changing world of trying to find ways to separate yourself from your opponent, it is important to take any step necessary to give yourself an edge over the opponent. We run Rick Torbett’s Read and React offensive system in our program and have enjoyed what it has brought to our players. The Read and React sets like the 5-Out Attack can be tailored to get touches in specific areas of the floor.

One area where we as a staff felt like were falling short for our players was in a lack of set plays. We always know those times where we are going to need those quick hitters to get a quick bucket, but we wanted to avoid totally changing our system to just throw in a few quick hitters. What we decided to go with was sets using the principles of the Read and React.

What these sets did was allow us to get quick buckets using our offensive principles. But even if we did not need a quick bucket, it still got our players moving within our offensive parameters.

Read and React Sets: 5-Out Attack

This Read and React 5-Out set gets the ball swinging side-to-side with lots of action to keep the defense occupied. If you have a player who is great at screening and slipping, this play will get them a look in the middle of the paint. If that look is not open, the ball ends up in the hands of a player who is great in a pick and roll look.

Read and React 5-Out

This Read and React set begins with a 5-Out formation. All five offensive players begin outside the three-point line to spread the defense out. This is effective against man-to-man defenses, particularly ones that like to deny passes and overplay.

Player 1 initiates the action with a pass to the wing. After the pass, Player 1 sets a weak side screen for Player 4. Once he’s set the screen, Player 1 cuts to the weak side corner as Player 3 fills up on the wing.

The second action for this set sees Player 2 center the ball with Player 4 at the top of the key. Once that pass is made, Player 5 and Player 1 both set pin screens on the perimeter. This action could create open looks for the shooters on the wing.

Read and React 5-Out

The next sequence of action involves Player 5 slipping the pin screen for a lay-up opportunity. Player 5 dives to the middle of the lane looking to post up his defender. Player 1, meanwhile, pops to the open space on the wing.

If those moves are covered by the defense, Player 4 passes to Player 1 then cuts away to screen for Player 2 in the corner. As Player 1 receives, Player 5 comes up the floor to set a ball screen.

This becomes a basic pick-and-roll action from the wing at this point. Player 1 can drive for a scoring opportunity or pass to a number of teammates. Player 2 will be shaping up on the wing, while Player 3 should do the same on the opposite side. The ball screener, Player 5, can roll while Player 4 sets up in the short corner.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Sets: Ball Screen Shooter Lift

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Sets: Dribble Handoff (DHO)

Read and React Sets: Dribble Handoff (DHO)

In this ever changing world of trying to find ways to separate yourself from your opponent, it is important to take any step necessary to give yourself an edge over the opponent. We run Rick Torbett’s Read and React offensive system in our program and have enjoyed what it has brought to our players. The Read and React sets like the Dribble Handoff can be tailored to get touches in specific areas of the floor.

One area where we as a staff felt like were falling short for our players was in a lack of set plays. We always know those times where we are going to need those quick hitters to get a quick bucket, but we wanted to avoid totally changing our system to just throw in a few quick hitters. What we decided to go with was sets using the principles of the Read and React.

What these sets did was allow us to get quick buckets using our offensive principles. But even if we did not need a quick bucket, it still got our players moving within our offensive parameters.

Read and React Sets: Dribble Handoff (DHO)

If you have a player that is a great downhill driver, this is the set for you! It gets every player on the court moving to confuse the defense. What’s more, this Read and React set allows that downhill player an opportunity to make a quick move/decision using the a dribble handoff. This move is also known as a “DHO.”

Read and React Dribble Handoff

This Read and React dribble handoff set begins with a 5-Out look. This spread formation forces the defense into help side coverage and creates multiple driving lanes.

The set starts with Player 1 making a pass to Player 4 on the wing. Once he initiates the action, Player 1 cuts to the weak side corner, away from his pass. As Player 1 makes his cut, Players 3 and 2 should fill up along the perimeter.

The second action in this set sees Player 4 center the ball to Player 3, then immediately sets a down screen for Player 5. This action occupies the defense on that side of the floor to set up the attacking action of this play.

Read and React Dribble Handoff

The attacking action of this Read and React set comes following a dribble handoff. Player 2 should be your team’s best creator using a ball screen. The movement of this set brought him to the wing and has opened the lane for a drive.

Player 3 initiates the dribble handoff move with a dribble-at toward the wing. Instead of cutting away from the ball, Player 2 receives the handoff and immediately works downhill to pressure the defense. At this point, both corners should be occupied by shooters. If Player 4 doesn’t have three-point range, he can slide up to the short corner. That move, though, could bring a help defender sooner.

As Player 2 attacks the lane, he can drive to the rim, kick out to shooters, or pull up for an elbow jumper.

Ideally, this 5-Out set involves your best shooters to space the floor. Player 2 should be your best decision maker with the ball. Also, this set can be run from either side of the floor to give the downhill driver access to their dominant hand.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Sets: 4-Out

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Sets: 4-Out, 1-In

Read and React Sets: 4-Out, 1-In

In this ever changing world of trying to find ways to separate yourself from your opponent, it is important to take any step necessary to give yourself an edge over the opponent. We run Rick Torbett’s Read and React offensive system in our program and have enjoyed what it has brought to our players. The Read and React sets like 4-Out can be tailored to get touches in specific areas of the floor.

One area where we as a staff felt like were falling short for our players was in a lack of set plays. We always know those times where we are going to need those quick hitters to get a quick bucket, but we wanted to avoid totally changing our system to just throw in a few quick hitters. What we decided to go with was sets using the principles of the Read and React.

What these sets did was allow us to get quick buckets using our offensive principles. But even if we did not need a quick bucket, it still got our players moving within our offensive parameters.

Read and React Sets: 4-Out, 1-In

This Read and React set is utilizing the 4-Out, 1-In look from the Read and React System. The set provides a player who’s good working off a ball screen to isolate on one side of the floor. 

Read and React 4-Out

For this Read and React 4-Out set, start with Player 4 on the inside. This puts your best post finisher, Player 5, in the corner to begin. Your point guard initiates the action with a pass to Player 2 in the corner. Player 2 should be your best pick-and-roll creator.

Once Player 1 makes the pass, he receives a back screen from Player 4 and makes a UCLA cut to the basket. As this happens, Player 5 sets a pin screen for Player 3 on the weak side. For Player 2, this first action can also be a catch-and-shoot opportunity.

The second action of this Read and React 4-Out set involves a ball screen. Most of the strong side has been cleared for this action to take place along the wing. Player 4 should pop to the corner or short corner once he’s set the screen. On the weak side, Player 1 sets a back screen for Player 5, to get the big man in post position.

Read and React 4-OuThe last sequence for this set leaves the decision-making to Player 2. After using the ball screen, Player 2 can attack the rim looking for a shot. Another option is kicking back to Player 4 in the corner or short corner.

As Player 2 drives, Player 3 should complete the Read and React Circle Movement into the weak side corner. That could be a clean look if the opposing defense shifted in help-side coverage.

Player 1 sets up on the wing for a catch-and-shoot opportunity, while Player 5 establishes post position on the weak side block. This set can be run from either side of the floor so that the driver uses his dominant hand on the take.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Sets: Post Finish

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Sets: Post Finish

Read and React Sets: Post Finish

In this ever changing world of trying to find ways to separate yourself from your opponent, it is important to take any step necessary to give yourself an edge over the opponent. We run Rick Torbett’s Read and React offensive system in our program and have enjoyed what it has brought to our players. The Read and React sets we use on offense can be tailored to get touches in specific areas of the floor.

One area where we as a staff felt like were falling short for our players was in a lack of set plays. We always know those times where we are going to need those quick hitters to get a quick bucket, but we wanted to avoid totally changing our system to just throw in a few quick hitters. What we decided to go with was sets using the principles of the Read and React.

What these sets did was allow us to get quick buckets using our offensive principles. But even if we did not need a quick bucket, it still got our players moving within our offensive parameters.

Read and React Sets: Post Finish

This one of the Read and React sets looks to get your best post player with an opportunity around the rim. Using specific ball movement and screening, the play creates space for a post finish. It helps when Player 1 in this diagram stands as a knockdown shooter. This keeps the opposing defense honest.

read and react sets

The play begins in a five-out set up. Player 1 drives hard to the wing at Player 4. This dribble-at move forces a basket cut by Player 4, who clears to the opposite corner. The other players behind 1 fill the empty spaces on the perimeter.

The next part of this set sees Player 1 pass to Player 2 in the corner. After making the pass, Player 1 cuts to the basket and touches the paint. Players 5, 3, and 4 must rotate to fill the empty spots on the perimeter.

read and react sets

Once the rotation happens, Player 1 reverse course and sets a back screen for Player 5. Player 2 can hit Player 5 with a leading pass as the post player makes the cut to the hoop. After setting the back screen, Player 1 should shape up for a jump shot.

On the weak side of the floor, another action takes place. Player 4 sets a pin screen for Player 3, who sets to shoot. Player 4 then flashes to the elbow. Should the post pass be defended, Player 2 has options: Player 1 for a three, a skip pass to Player 3, or an elbow entry for Player 4.


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Read and React Basketball Drills: Laker Cut

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Be sure to check out that episode for some great content on the journey of Coach Torbett, how Read and React came about, and the philosophy behind the offense.

Episode: 901 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 1)

Ep: 902 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 2)

Ep: 903 Read and React with Rick Torbett (Part 3)


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: UCLA Cut

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: UCLA Cut

The Read and React is a great basketball offense. The only issue I have come across in our time running it is it can be difficult to get points quickly out of it. I did some research and playing with the Read and React and utilized the principles of this basketball offense to create some set plays out of it, including one with a UCLA cut.

These should offer good opportunities to score quickly out of the look while the opposing team thinks you’re still just running your offense. Even if you don’t run Read and React, these looks could still be utilized as great set play options to get good movement and looks at the basket.

Read and React Basketball: UCLA Cut

Another look that has action happening on both sides of the court to keep everyone busy and involved. This read and react set incorporates some basketball staples like pick and roll action and a few UCLA screens.

read and react basketball UCLA

This set beings in a 4-out, 1-in alignment. Player 1 passed to the corner, then makes a UCLA cut off a back screen from Player 4. 1 should cut with his hand up, looking for a pass from 2. While this action takes place, Player 5 sets a pin screen for Player 3. If 1 isn’t open on the UCLA cut, 2 can look to skip the ball to 3 for an open look.

This read and react set continues when 4 sets a ball screen for 2. 4 fades to the corner while 2 attacks the lane. While the strong side pick and roll happens, 1 sets a back screen for 5. 

read and react basketball UCLAPlayer 2 should be a solid ball handler and decision maker, considering he’s the focal point of this set. As he attacks the lane, 2 should read the defense and react accordingly.

Player 2’s options include driving to the rim for a layup attempt or hitting 5 on the left block. Player 4’s on the wing and Player 3 should cut to the opposite corner. 1 clears to be an outlet if the defense covers each option.

This play is easily reversible for a right-handed drive.

 


Related: Read and React – 5-Out Post Look

Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep 1246 Running the Read and React Offense


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Read and React Basketball Offense Series: 5-Out Post Look

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: 5-Out Post Look

The Read and React is a great basketball offensive system. The only issue I have come across in our time running it is it can be difficult to get points quickly out of it. I did some research and playing with the Read and React and utilized the principles of this basketball offense to create some set plays out of it.

These should offer good opportunities to score quickly out of the look while the opposing team thinks you’re still just running your offense. Even if you don’t run Read and React, these looks could still be utilized as great set play options to get good movement and looks at the basket.

Read and React Basketball Offense: 5-Out Post Look

If you have a very good post player or just someone that is good at finishing around the rim, this is a good look for them. It starts with a dribble-at to initiate the offense to clear out the right side a little bit. We have action happening on the weak side to keep everyone busy and hopefully get a good look for the 5 in the paint.

read and react basketball

This read and react play begins with your basketball team using a 5-out set. The point guard dribble hard at the wing toward Player 4, who cuts toward the basket. 4’s cut finishes in the opposite corner. As Player 1 fills the wing, Players 5 and 3 rotate up one spot along the perimeter.

From there, Player 1 makes a pass to Player 2 in the corner. Player 1 then cuts, calling for the ball as he does so. Players 5, 3, and 4 all rotate to fill the open spaces on the perimeter. Player 1 gets into the paint but stops his cut under the basket.

read and react basketball

1 reverses his course and sets a back screen for Player 5 on the wing. Player 5 makes his cut toward the basket. At this point, Player 2 can either hit 5 with a pass on the cut or wait for 5 to post up on the block.

On the weak side of this read and react play, the Player 4 sets a flare screen for Player 3 then cuts to the strong-side elbow. If Player 5’s cut was covered, Player 2 can throw a skip pass to Player 3. He can also clear the ball to Player 1 or hit Player 4 on the elbow. If Player 4 gets the ball, this set creates a high-low opportunity with Player 5.


Related: Read & React Offense – Pin Screens

Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep 1323. Read and React Offense with Rick Torbett


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: Pin Screens

Read and React Basketball Offense Series: Pin Screens

The Read and React is a great basketball offensive system. The only issue I have come across in our time running it is it can be difficult to get points quickly out of it. I did some research and playing with the Read and React and utilized the principles of this basketball offense to create some set plays out of it.

These should offer good opportunities to score quickly out of the look while the opposing team thinks you’re still just running your offense. Even if you don’t run Read and React, these looks could still be utilized as great set play options to get good movement and looks at the basket.

Read and React Basketball Offense: Pin Screens

This is a VERY quick set, especially if you need a quick 2-point basket. The player on the left wing will receive a pin screen and they’ll curl to the block. For this play to be most effective, the player setting the pin screen on the left wing needs to be a knockdown shooter.

read and react basketball offense

The initial action of this read and react basketball offense set play involves your two bigs setting pin screens for your wings. Of these two bigs, Player 4 should be a better outside shooter than Player 5. When setting these screens, Player 4’s back should face the corner while Player 5’s back faces the sideline. 

As the screens are set, Player 2 curls toward the basket. Player 3 fades to the corner. The first look for your point guard should be for the layup. If not, the second read is for the shooter in the corner.

read and react basketball offenseThe second phase of this read and react basketball set involves a series of cuts for the offense. If neither Player 2 nor Player 3 are open on the pin screens, Player 4 flares to the wing. Player 2 cuts to the corner, and Player 5 cuts to the basket.

Another option here would be a high-low action with Players 4 and 5. In that option, Player 2 and Player 5 make still make their cuts, but Player 4 remains at the elbow. Player 1 makes an entry pass to 4 and clears to the opposite wing.

Player 4 would then look down low for Player 5, who has ideally sealed his defender when he made his cut.


Related: Read and React Basketball Offense Series: UCLA Cut

Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep 1323. Read and React Offense with Rick Torbett


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Basketball Quick Hitter Series: Pistol Action

Basketball Quick Hitter Series: Pistol Action

Getting good looks at the basket remains the primary focus of most offenses. Although there’s value in developing intricate offensive sets, sometimes in a close basketball game, getting a quick hitter releases the pressure and allows your team to thrive. A good basketball playbook features a number of options across a variety of situations, and having a consistent quick hitter is an absolute must. Sometimes, getting your best basketball players going downhill toward the basket with a pistol action helps create easy looks.

This is especially true as a season winds down or teams begin their postseason tournaments. You’re team’s already been well-scouted at this point, and you may have matched up with your opponents more than once. So it’s important to keep your opponents on their toes with a fresh playbook. The tricky part remains how to add to our repertoire without providing an extra burden on our players.

Enter the Basketball Quick Hitter series. These simple sets afford any offense release valves that players learn in a matter of minutes.


Basketball Quick Hitter: Pistol Action Progression

The basketball pistol play refers to an early offense action between the point guard and a wing player, with a post player at the top of the arc. The two main Pistol options to start a play are a dribble handoff and a pick and roll. In the Pistol action, the offense attempts to catch the defense before it sets in hopes to find optimal mismatches or blown coverage by a lack of defensive rotation, which makes it one of the best basketball quick hitters.

basketball pistol action

The sequence of this play begins with your point guard hitting ahead quickly to the wing. From there, Player 1 follows his pass and sprints into a dribble handoff with Player 2. As this pistol action develops, Player 4 sets a screen for Player 3 on the weak side. 4 rolls to the basket while 3 slips to the corner.

Player 1 needs to sprint up the basketball court into this pistol action. Completing the dribble handoff creates the quick-hitter here, because 1 is now going downhill to the basket at full speed.

basketball pistol action

If the defense covers this initial pistol action, the secondary scoring option unfolds for your basketball team. Player 2 cuts off a flare screen from Player 5. Player 1 on the wing has two options at this point: a pass to Player 2, who will have either a shot or a drive.

After setting the flare screen, Player 5 dives toward the hoop, drawing the defense down with him. While all that action is going on, 4 and 3 can screen for each other on the weak side to keep the defense honest.


Related: Entry Play & Quick-Hitter Offense

Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep 97: Quick Hitter: Drills and Practice – Quick Hitter and Talking about Drills and Practice


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Basketball Quick Hitter Series: Quick Backdoor Cut

Basketball Quick Hitter Series: Quick Backdoor Cut

Getting good looks at the basket remains the primary focus of most offenses. Although there’s value in developing intricate offensive sets, sometimes in a close basketball game, getting a quick hitter releases the pressure and allows your team to thrive. A good basketball playbook features a number of options across a variety of situations, and having a consistent quick hitter is an absolute must. Sometimes, a simple quick backdoor cut provides all the offense you need.

This is especially true as a season winds down or teams begin their postseason tournaments. You’re team’s already been well-scouted at this point, and you may have matched up with your opponents more than once. So it’s important to keep your opponents on their toes with a fresh playbook. The tricky part remains how to add to our repertoire without providing an extra burden on our players.

Enter the Basketball Quick Hitter series. These simple sets afford any offense release valves that players learn in a matter of minutes.

Basketball Quick Hitter: Quick Backdoor Cut

This quick hitter generates a great, quick backdoor cut opportunity for your offense. The play requires precise timing to ensure maximum efficiency. You’ll want to design this play with the player you want shooting the ball on the left wing.

quick backdoor cut

The play opens with a fairly traditional set up, with both bigs starting down low and the shooters occupying the wings. The point guard brings up the ball, and as he crosses half court, the action of this quick hitter begins. The wings exchange positions on the floor, with Player 3 starting the movement and Player 2 waiting until 3 passes the right elbow. Player 3 initiating the movement draws the eyes of the defense away from Player 2.

Once the wings have exchanged, the bigs cut up to the elbows. The point guard, Player 1, can lead the defense to the left with his dribble before an entry bounce pass to Player 5 at the elbow. Player 3 clears from the wing and floats to the weak side corner at this point.

quick backdoor cut

This is where the quick-hitting element of this quick backdoor cut takes place. As Player 5 receives the ball at the elbow, Player 2 starts his quick backdoor cut. Player 2 can set up his defender with fake or hard step toward the top of the key before his backdoor cut. 5 looks for 2 on the cut. 5 should use his peripheral vision to read the play

As the pass happens, Player 4 sets a flare screen for Player 1, who cuts to the left wing. Should the defense cover Player 2’s cut, 5 should look to skip the ball to 1 on the wing. This secondary action keeps multiple actions occupying the defense.


Related: Quick Hitter Series: Post Player Touch

Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep 97: Quick Hitter: Drills and Practice – Quick Hitter and Talking about Drills and Practice


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