Youth Basketball Coaches Clinic All New for 2023!

Youth Basketball Coaches Clinic All New for 2023!

Calling all basketball enthusiasts and aspiring youth coaches! Are you ready to elevate your coaching game and make a lasting impact on young basketball players? We’re thrilled to introduce the latest addition to our basketball coaching community – the Youth Basketball Coaches Clinic!

If you’re passionate about nurturing the next generation of basketball stars and want to gain practical insights and knowledge on how to effectively teach the game to youth players aged 6 to 14, this clinic is tailor-made for you. In this blog post, we’ll give you a sneak peek into what you can expect from this exciting coaching experience, designed to empower coaches of all levels with the skills and strategies needed to inspire and develop young athletes on the court. So, let’s lace up those sneakers and dive into a world of youth basketball coaching excellence!

Youth Basketball Coaches Clinic [All New for 2023]

The basketball coaches clinic is a 5-day season prep accelerator master class. It provides practical insight and education on how to teach the game specifically to youth players of all ability levels from ages 6 to 14. Your trainers are both veteran coaches who’ve seen just about everything during their careers.

Coach Steve Collins sports 30 years of experience as a high school coach. He’s won three state titles and is the mastermind behind TeachHoops.com. Coach Bill Flitter holds 15 years of coaching experience, having run programs at both the high school and grade school levels. Both coaches host the Coaching Youth Hoops Podcast.

Get An All Access Pass to the Youth Coaching Clinics, with over 150 minutes of training, today! If you want to streamline your season prep, implement winning strategies immediately, and get better results faster, these five immersive videos are your springboard to coaching excellence.

Youth Basketball Coaches Clinic Modules

Module 1: The 5-Step System to Running Tryouts Like a 10-Year Head Coach

Say goodbye to guesswork! No more biased choices. Included in the packet are all the basketball tryout evaluation forms, including the Player Selection Rubric – an indispensable tool for fair evaluations. Create your dream team based on merit and skill.

 

Module 2: Learn this one thing that will make everything else fall into place

We are going to walk you through the one thing that took us over 5 years to learn that has completely transformed the way we coach.

 

Basketball Coaches Clinic: How to teach your offense and defense in one practice

Module 3: How to teach your offense and defense in one practice

Wondering what basketball offense to run? Struggling to defend? Learn how to quickly boost player’s retention and teach your offense and defense in one practice.

 

 

basketball coaches clinic: how to create the perfect basketball practice plan in under 30 minutes

Module 4: How to create the perfect basketball practice plan in under 30 minutes

Your practice plan could be hurting your success on the court. Learn the winning ways to create a structured practice plan that doesn’t require a lot of time or knowledge of the game.

 

Module 5: 10 insider secrets winning coaches use to sneak out more wins

Learn the art that is managing game flow. We dive into proper time outs, bench etiquette , pre and post game routines and so much more.

 


Related: 3 Important Take Aways from “Return of the King


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Preparing for Youth Basketball Tryouts

Preparing for Youth Basketball Tryouts

As the sun sets on summer and the echoes of bouncing basketballs fill the crisp autumn air, it’s that time of the year again – youth basketball tryouts. The anticipation is palpable, both for the young athletes vying for their spot on the team and for the dedicated coaches who will guide them through this pivotal journey.

In this blog post, we’re lacing up our sneakers to dive into the art of preparing for and conducting youth basketball tryouts. From crafting a well-structured evaluation plan to fostering a positive and inclusive atmosphere, we’ll explore the essential strategies that will help you identify the diamond-in-the-rough players and build a team that thrives both on and off the court.

Preparing for Youth Basketball Tryouts

The first question any coach needs to ask themself is: what type of team will you have? The answer to this question will largely influence the types of drills you select. These drills will be staples of any practice plan, but they’ll also be valuable evaluation tools during tryouts.

The first thing to consider is athleticism. Coaches need to implement some sort of transition drill into any effective tryout. Players need to demonstrate how well they run and what type of shape they’re in. From there, higher level transition drills can evaluate decision making skills as well.

Beyond transition drills, coaches should definitely include station work as well. This is particularly useful with multiple coaches on staff. But even if you’re working alone as a coach, being able to have the players rotate through stations will give you a glimpse at their skill level. These stations can include ball handling, form shooting and free throws, among other things.

Small game groups also provides the coach with a good read of the players during tryouts. Having the players play 3-on-3, 2-on-2, or even 1-on-1 brings together several of the evaluation elements you need to consider. In these small group environments, it’s harder for players to “hide.”

Another effective practice during basketball tryouts might be to teach a new drill or offensive set. This forces the players to pay attention for a long stretch of time. It also provides coaches with a look at who the most engaged athletes are. Coaches also get a sense of who the most “coachable” players are during these teaching moments.

Finally, adding some element of communication and teamwork remains incredibly important and valuable. These drills or situations can shine a light on players with leadership potential. They also provide players with an opportunity to stand out among the others.

What to Look For In Players

Assembling a roster can often be a difficult task. But the first thing a coach should consider, especially when working off a roster that has returning players, is, which of these new talents can fill a specific role.

Of these potential new players, are there any that clearly make the team better? Which of the player will the team community? What positions might these new players fill?

Coaches should always look for specific elements as well. Among those elements:

  • Athleticism
  • Attitude
  • Effort
  • Physical aspects (height and length)
  • X factor

Related: Basketball Player Evaluation Form for Tryouts


Resources:

Downloadable PDF Content

Player Tryout Forms

Valuable Tryout Rubric – Skills and Scoring


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep: 57 Conducting Basketball Tryouts


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

3 Youth Basketball Rebounding Drills

3 Youth Basketball Rebounding Drills

In this post, we’re diving into a fundamental skill that can shape the success of young players on the court – rebounding.

Rebounding, often hailed as the “hidden key” to basketball victory, is a skill that transcends age and experience levels. It’s not just about grabbing the ball off the rim; it’s about seizing control, shifting momentum, and creating valuable opportunities for your team. At its core, rebounding embodies the tenacity and determination that are the heartbeats of basketball.

In the following discussion, we’ll explore a collection of youth basketball rebounding drills designed to instill this critical skill from an early age. From understanding box-out techniques to enhancing positioning and fostering the right mindset, these drills go beyond the surface, nurturing players who contribute dynamically on both ends of the court. So, join us as we delve into the world of youth basketball rebounding, unlocking the techniques that can define a player’s journey from the paint to the scoreboard.

Youth Basketball Rebounding Drills: Defensive Position

Precise timing for your jump holds significance in rebounding, but it’s your positioning that ultimately places you advantageously to seize a rebound. Employing boxing-out techniques is crucial as you employ your body to fend off opponents while striving for the rebound.

For this drill, all you require is one or more partners, with one designated shooter. Ideally, the offensive and defensive players should be evenly matched in number. The defensive players position themselves around the free-throw area, while the offensive players stand slightly beyond the key. Upon the shot’s release, defensive players locate the closest offensive player, utilizing their body to box them out and prevent the rebound.

The drill’s objective for defensive players is to let the ball bounce after the shot, while the offensive players strive to secure the rebound. This drill significantly underscores the significance of sound body positioning on the defensive side. Once every offensive player has taken a shot, switch roles and repeat the process.

Youth Basketball Rebounding Drills: Timing

In this drill, the first person initiates by self-passing off the backboard, securing the rebound with a strong two-handed grip. After gaining control, pivot and pass to the next player, who replicates the drill.

This cultivates comfort in grabbing the ball, practicing pivoting, and passing post-rebound. Repetition is required. While optimal for team practice, you can adapt it for just one partner.

Youth Basketball Rebounding Drills: Hustle

The cliche many coaches acknowledge says rebounding is 20 percent skill and 80 percent hustle. The last of these youth basketball rebounding drills hones the significance of resolute ball retrieval or thwarting your partner’s attempt.

For this, you’ll need one or more partners and a ball. If possible, match sizes and positions. There will be an offensive and a defensive player. A ball is placed a few feet away.

From the defensive stance, the objective is to box out and prevent the offensive player from reaching the ball for five seconds. This drill effectively simulates the unwavering determination required to excel as a great rebounder.


Related: 3 Developmental Rebounding Drills for Practice


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

3 Preseason Basketball Conditioning Drills

3 Preseason Basketball Conditioning Drills

A well-conditioned team is one poised for significant triumph on the basketball court. Yet, achieving such a level of readiness demands a dedicated focus on basketball conditioning drills. This can be particularly useful in the preseason. Numerous approaches exist for achieving this: including sprints, distance training, rigorous drills targeting in-game stamina, or a blend of the aforementioned methods.

In our training regimen, extended distance running receives the least emphasis. This choice is grounded in the understanding that basketball primarily involves bursts of energy rather than prolonged jogging or running. Instead, our preference leans towards incorporating conditioning through dynamic wind sprints and specialized drills engineered to enhance overall endurance.

Basketball Conditioning Drills: Defensive Slides

This is a great drill for working on different defensive movements and can be used as a warm-up drill. Players will work on many defensive fundamentals: defensive slides, back-pedalling, close-outs, drop-steps, and sprinting.

A line of players begins behind the baseline on one side of the key. If available, place d-men or cones on the elbows so that players have a visual to close-out to. No basketballs are needed for this drill.

Players should complete the course as quick as they can while still in control of their body. Pay attention to the footwork of the players. Players must be closing out with short steps and get one hand up. They must stay on-balance during this. Some variations include increasing the distance and flipping to the opposite side of the floor.

Basketball Conditioning Drills: The Riley Test

This is a conditioning test from the Xavier Newsletter #198. This is a great conditioning exercise because it is tough but achievable for players to accomplish.

The Riley Test is five “down and back” runs. The players start on the baseline and must run those five down and back sprints. It is best to group your players by position. After each set the players get a 2:30 break.

The goal for high school boys has always been anywhere from 1:05-1:10 per set and for the girls has been 1:10-1:20. This can decrease as you go throughout the season or get more conditioned. We always started with 3 sets but never did more than 6 sets.

Basketball Conditioning Drills: Champion Runs

This is a run that I ran in my high school under my coach Andy Elkins. It is a long sprint where if you don’t give 100 percent effort, it is impossible to complete.

The Champion Run consists of the following: 1 valley (see note in intro paragraph) followed by 5 full court touches (full court touch= start at 1 baseline and sprint to opposite baseline is 1). Coach Elkins always said the beauty of the Champion Run is that you will end up on the opposite baseline from where you started, so you might as well run two Champion Runs!

We do these runs when we don’t make free throws like we should, commit too many turnovers, or for just some good old-fashioned conditioning. We time these. Boys, especially guards and wings, should complete a Champion Run in the 1:00-1:07 range. Girl basketball players should complete a Champion Run in the 1:10-1:16 range.


Related: Better Basketball – the Funnel Down Defense


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Youth Basketball Practice Plan: End-of-Game Situations

Youth Basketball Practice Plan: End-of-Game Situations

As youth basketball coaches, we understand the immense significance of preparing our young athletes to excel in high-stakes moments during the game. Whether it’s hitting a game-winning shot, nailing crucial free throws, or effectively managing the clock, end-of-game situations can often determine the outcome of a match. In our latest blog post, we present a comprehensive practice plan tailored to help young players develop the skills, decision-making, and composure needed to thrive in these pressure-filled moments.

Join us as we dive into a specific practice plan with drills that simulate game scenarios, designed to instill confidence, teamwork, and strategic thinking in our youth basketball team. With a structured progression and targeted exercises, we aim to empower both players and coaches to master end-of-game situations and turn them into game-changing opportunities for success on the court. Let’s lead our young athletes towards greatness in the most critical moments of the game!

Practice Plan: End-of-Game Situations

Objective: The goal of this practice plan is to develop the youth basketball team’s skills, decision-making, and composure in end-of-game situations. By incorporating specific drills that simulate game-like scenarios, the players will gain the confidence and ability to excel in pressure-filled moments during real games.

Timing: 90 minutes

Warm-up (10 minutes):

  • Begin with a dynamic warm-up, including light jogging, dynamic stretches, and agility drills to get players physically and mentally prepared for the practice.

Drill 1: “Game-Winning Shot” (15 minutes):

  • Set up a game-like situation where the team is trailing by two points with 15 seconds left on the game clock.
  • Divide the team into two groups and run controlled scrimmages, focusing on executing plays to get an open shot opportunity.
  • The defense should apply pressure to simulate real-game conditions.

Rationale: This drill allows players to practice making game-winning shots under pressure and improves their ability to execute plays effectively in tight game situations.

Drill 2: “Free-Throw Pressure” (10 minutes):

  • Players pair up, and each player takes turns shooting a pair of free throws.
  • Add consequences for missed free throws, such as doing push-ups or a short sprint.
  • Increase the pressure by making the players complete a physical activity before attempting the free throws.

Rationale: Practicing free throws under pressure helps players build confidence and composure when facing crucial moments at the free-throw line during real games.

Drill 3: “Clock Management Challenge” (20 minutes):

  • Set up different end-of-game scenarios with various time left on the game clock (e.g., 10 seconds, 30 seconds, 1 minute).
  • Divide the team into two groups, with one team trailing and the other leading by a few points.
  • Teams practice managing the clock effectively and making strategic decisions based on the game situation.

Rationale: This drill enhances players’ understanding of clock management and decision-making, which are vital skills during end-of-game situations.

Drill 4: “End-of-Quarter Quick Hitter” (15 minutes):

  • Implement your go-to play for End-of-Game, End-of-Quarter, or End-of-Half situations. If you don’t have one, be sure to view the clip below for a good one!
  • Run several repetitions with varying scenarios, such as different scores, time remaining, and defenders applying pressure.

Rationale: This drill allows players to practice a specific play designed for end-of-quarter situations, promoting teamwork and adaptability under pressure.

Cool Down and Review (10 minutes):

  • Conclude the practice with a cooldown that includes static stretches to prevent injuries and promote recovery.
  • Review the key takeaways from the practice and provide constructive feedback to the players on their performance.

Progression: As the team becomes more proficient in handling end-of-game situations, gradually increase the difficulty by shortening the time available, adding defensive pressure, or incorporating multiple scoring options in plays.

By following this practice plan and incorporating specific drills for end-of-game situations, the youth basketball team will develop essential skills and strategies to succeed in high-pressure moments. Repeated practice in these scenarios will instill confidence, composure, and cohesion among the players, ultimately translating into improved performance during real games.


Related: Practice Drills for End-of-Game Scenarios


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Basketball Practice Drills for End-of-Game Scenarios

Basketball Practice Drills for End-of-Game Scenarios

When practicing for end-of-game situations in youth basketball, it’s essential to focus on drills that simulate game-like scenarios and help players develop the necessary skills and decision-making abilities. Having practice drills specific for End-of-Game situations will help develop your team’s confidence in those key moments.

Here are some good youth basketball drills to run for end-of-game situations:

Practice Drills for End-of-Game Scenarios

1. Scrimmages with Time Constraints: Divide the team into two groups and play controlled scrimmages with specific time constraints, such as 1 minute or 30 seconds left on the game clock. Emphasize executing plays, managing the clock, and making quick decisions under pressure.

2. Free-Throw Pressure: Create pressure situations in free-throw shooting drills, where players have to make critical shots with the game on the line. Add consequences for missed free throws to increase the pressure.

3. Quick Transition Offense and Defense: Practice transitioning from defense to offense and vice versa quickly. Emphasize making fast decisions, passing, and attacking in transition to capitalize on opportunities.

4. Defensive Stops Drill: Set up scenarios where the defensive team needs to make consecutive stops to win the game. The offensive team tries to score, and the defensive team must secure rebounds and prevent scoring to succeed.

5. Decision-Making Scenarios: Design drills that force players to make quick decisions based on the game situation, such as whether to hold for the last shot, take an open shot, or pass to a teammate.

6. Clock Management Drill: Run scenarios where the team must manage the clock effectively, making deliberate decisions to use or save timeouts and control the pace of the game.

7. Simulated Game Endings: Recreate actual end-of-game situations from previous games or popular basketball moments. Have the team watch footage and discuss the strategies used, then try to replicate those scenarios in practice.


Related: Youth Basketball End-of-Quarter Quick Hitter


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1699 Success Leaves Clues


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

7 Reasons to Practice End-of-Game Situations

7 Reasons to Practice End-of-Game Situations

As a veteran basketball coach who has witnessed countless thrilling finishes and heart-wrenching losses, I understand the immense value of preparing young athletes for the intense pressure and critical decision-making that accompanies end-of-game situations.

These nail-biting moments can define the outcome of a basketball game, making them an essential aspect to address during practice sessions. In this post, I will delve into seven compelling reasons why youth basketball coaches should prioritize practicing end-of-game situations with their teams.

From fostering composure under pressure to enhancing strategic thinking, these reasons highlight the significant impact that targeted practice in these scenarios can have on the development and success of young players. So, let’s explore the crucial reasons why dedicating time and effort to practicing end-of-game situations is vital for the growth and achievement of our youth basketball teams.

7 Reasons to Practice End-of-Game Situations

As a veteran coach, I can emphasize the crucial importance of practicing end-of-game situations for a youth basketball team. Here are several reasons why practicing these scenarios is essential:

1.  Building Confidence

End-of-game situations can be high-pressure moments that require composure and decision-making under stress.

By practicing these scenarios, players become more comfortable and confident in executing their roles and responsibilities when the game is on the line. This confidence translates into better performance and reduced anxiety during real-game situations.

2. Enhancing Execution

End-of-game situations often involve specific plays, strategies, and tactics.

By practicing these scenarios, players learn how to execute these plays effectively, make precise passes, set screens correctly, and execute scoring opportunities. Regular practice allows players to refine their skills and improve their execution in critical moments.

3. Developing Decision-Making Skills

End-of-game situations require players to make quick and smart decisions based on the game’s context.

Practicing these scenarios allows players to develop their basketball IQ, understand the importance of time management, shot selection, and reading the defense. It helps them become more knowledgeable and skilled in making intelligent decisions in pressure-filled situations.

4. Team Cohesion and Communication

End-of-game situations require seamless coordination and communication among teammates.

By practicing these scenarios, players develop a better understanding of each other’s strengths, tendencies, and preferred plays. They learn to communicate effectively, anticipate each other’s moves, and make collective decisions that can lead to successful outcomes.

5. Minimizing Mistakes

End-of-game situations can be unforgiving, and even small mistakes can have significant consequences.

By practicing these scenarios, players become more aware of potential errors and develop strategies to avoid them. This includes minimizing turnovers, making solid passes, executing plays correctly, and maintaining focus until the final buzzer.

6. Instilling a Winning Mindset

Practicing end-of-game situations instills a winning mindset in young players. It teaches them to never give up, fight until the end, and believe in their abilities.

By rehearsing these scenarios repeatedly, players understand that victory is achievable in challenging situations, boosting their motivation and competitive spirit.

7. Preparedness for Real Games

Youth basketball teams often face close games where end-of-game situations become decisive.

By practicing these scenarios regularly, players are better prepared to handle the pressure and execute their roles effectively. They can enter real games with the confidence and skills necessary to succeed in critical moments.

Overall, practicing end-of-game situations is invaluable for a youth basketball team. It not only enhances their basketball skills and decision-making abilities but also fosters team cohesion, confidence, and a winning mindset. These skills and qualities extend beyond basketball and can positively impact players’ lives both on and off the court.


Related: 5 Questions to Ask Before Basketball End-of-Game Situations


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Youth Basketball End of Game Situations

Youth Basketball End of Game Situations

Basketball End of Game situations refer to the specific scenarios and strategies that teams employ in the closing moments of a basketball game when the score is close and every possession becomes critical. These situations typically involve various tactics aimed at maximizing scoring opportunities, managing the clock, and maintaining or gaining a competitive advantage.

It’s important to note that end-of-game situations can vary depending on the specific rules and regulations of different basketball leagues and organizations. Coaches and players often develop unique strategies and adjustments based on their team’s strengths, the opponent’s weaknesses, and the game’s context.

Here’s a look at seven elements basketball coaches should consider when dealing with End of Game situations.

7 Elements to Consider During Basketball End of Game Situations

  1. Game-Winning/Go-Ahead Possession: When a team is trailing by a small margin or tied, they have the opportunity to execute a play to score and take the lead or win the game.
  2. Clock Management: Teams need to be mindful of the game clock and shot clock in order to maximize their possessions and prevent the opposing team from having enough time for a comeback. This may involve intentionally fouling to stop the clock, strategic timeouts, or using quick fouls to send the opponent to the free-throw line and conserve time.
  3. Free-Throw Strategies: Depending on the score and time remaining, teams may employ different strategies when shooting free throws or defending against them. This can include intentionally missing a free throw to create an opportunity for an offensive rebound or committing intentional fouls to prevent the opposing team from attempting a potential game-tying or game-winning shot.
  4. Inbound Plays: Out-of-bounds situations, especially when the offensive team is near their basket with limited time, require well-designed plays to create open scoring opportunities. These plays often involve screens, cuts, and decoy movements to confuse the defense.
  5. Three-Point Shooting: With the increased value of three-pointers, teams may strategically seek three-point shots to quickly close a scoring gap or take the lead.
  6. Defensive Strategies: Teams may employ specific defensive strategies, such as full-court pressure, double-teaming star players, or denying certain passes, to disrupt the opposing team’s offensive flow and force turnovers.
  7. Overtime Strategies: When a game is tied at the end of regulation, teams enter an overtime period with additional time to determine the winner. Overtime basketball strategies are similar to end of game situations, but teams need to adapt and adjust their approach based on the game’s flow and player fouls.

Prepping for Basketball End of Game Situations

Preparing for end of game situations are crucial for basketball coaches at any level. Often times, however, this remains overlooked when developing their practice plans. Coaches continually drill aspects of an offensive set or a defensive approach, but sometimes forget those end-of-game scenarios.

Competitive practice games stand as one useful tool. These drills inject energy into practice that’s usually reserved for game nights. Competitive games, especially ones where the losing team feels the consequences, allow coaches to bring a high-level of energy to the practice floor.

Another thing basketball coaches should consider is developing specific in-practice scenarios to prepare for those end of game situations. These scenarios might play out during a controlled scrimmage. But adding specific elements like time and score will aid in that preparation. Something like, asking a team to hold a single-digit lead for three minutes. Or maybe the “best” player is not available due to foul trouble. Options are only limited by the coach’s creativity.

Check out the YouTube link below for a specific discussion between coaches on how to deal with end of game situations. In this segment, coaches use real game footage to talk through the options available.


Related: Defensive Drills and Rebounding Techniques


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Better Basketball: Point Motion Shooting Drills

Better Basketball: Point Motion Shooting Drills

Last month’s article dealt with the installation of various Point Motion sets. What I want to focus on in this month’s article are some drills to help install and get your players shots out of these various looks. We all know that as coaches we want todevelop the needed muscle memory, footwork, and confidence from the spots on the court where the shots will come from.

Below I will describe 3 different shooting drills with diagrams attached to help get shots for players in the spots they will shoot from.

Point Motion Shooting Drills

Drill 1: Need 2 lines. 1 line in the left pinch area where the 5 will usually receive the ball and a line on the right wing. You also need a coach/manager in the right pinch area with a ball.

The line of players with a ball will pass their ball to the right wing and immediately set a ball screen. The player on the right wing will receive the ball and drive for a layup. The player that sets the screen will pop and receive a pass from the coach/manager for a shot.

Switch lines after each rep to work both actions.

shooting drills

Drill 2: Same setup as Drill 1. The ball line will dribble and do a handoff with the other line. The lin without the ball to start will take that handoff and drive for a layup.

After the handoff, the player that started with the ball and shape up for a shot attempt from a pass from the coach/manager.

Switch lines after each rep to work both actions.

shooting drills

Drill 3: This drill needs 2 lines, 1 on the right wing and 1 on the left wing. The line on the right wing will start with balls. They will drive down to the baseline, attacking the paint. The other line will move from the left wing to the left corner.

Once the player with the ball gets to the baseline area, they will hit their teammate in the opposite corner. The player willreceive the pass in the left corner and take a shot.

Switch lines after each rep to work both actions.

shooting drills


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: 4 Essential Individual Defensive Drills to Practice


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1720 Coaching Youth Hoops


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

4 Essential Individual Defensive Drills to Practice

4 Essential Individual Defensive Drills to Practice

Defense is a critical component of basketball success, and in this blog, we will provide you with valuable insights and effective drills to enhance your players’ defensive skills. From mastering defensive stance and closing out to excelling in rebounding and pressure defense, we have curated a collection of individual defensive drills to help your team elevate their game.

Whether you’re a coach looking to sharpen your coaching strategies or a player seeking to improve your defensive prowess, our blog is your go-to resource. Let’s dive into the world of individual defensive drills for better basketball performance!

Essential Individual Defensive Drills for Better Basketball

To maximize our practice time, it’s crucial to allocate the first 3-5 minutes to warm up our athletes mentally and physically while focusing on fundamental techniques. By repeatedly executing and reviewing the basics throughout the season, we can build a solid foundation for continuous skill development. Here are the skills I plan to emphasize during these individual defensive drills:

  1. Stance
  2. Closing out
  3. Chinning a rebound followed by a good outlet pass

For the initial week and a half to two weeks, I’ll prioritize these drills daily. Building upon the previous segment, let’s move on to the next set of drills:

Defensive Drill: 1-on-1 Box Out

Coach starts with the ball on the wing, offense on the opposite wing, and defense in helpside.

The coach shoots, and the defense boxes out, pursues the ball, and rotates to offense. Intensity increases gradually as defense improves.

Defensive Drill: 1-on-1 Full Court – Force Sideline

Start in the baseline/sideline corner, with the ballhandler attempting to beat the defender to the middle of the court.

The defender’s task is to stay on the inside hip of the ball handler, forcing them up the sideline. Proper positioning is vital.

Defensive Drill: 1-on-1 Pressure the Passer

Offensive and defensive players positioned on wings, with the remaining players forming lines on the blocks.

Defense applies pressure without fouling for 5 seconds as the offense holds the ball. The offense then attempts an entry pass into the post while the defense aims for a deflection.

Defensive Drill: 1-on-1 Jump to the Ball

Offensive and defensive players start on each wing, with a coach at the top of the key. The offense passes to the coach, and the defense jumps towards the ball.

The offense then V-cuts down to the block while the defense prevents them from cutting in front of their face. Intensity increases progressively.

By incorporating these individual defensive drills into your practice routine, you’ll lay the groundwork for better basketball performance. Remember to focus on technique, gradually increase intensity, and provide feedback to enhance your players’ defensive abilities. Stay tuned for more valuable basketball insights and drills!


Related: 6 Steps to Teach Any Offensive Skill, Play, or Offense


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1723 Funnel Down Defense


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Better Basketball: 6 Steps to Teach any Skill, Play, or Offense

Better Basketball: 6 Steps to Teach any Skill, Play, or Offense

Welcome to our guide on teaching offensive skills, plays, and offenses for better basketball performance. In this article, we present six progressive steps designed to enhance your coaching approach and help your players play better basketball on the court.

By following these steps, you’ll be able to introduce new skills effectively, ensure proper execution, increase speed, incorporate teamwork, integrate defensive elements, and ultimately apply the learned techniques in real-game situations. Whether you’re a seasoned coach or just starting out, this guide will provide you with a solid framework to teach and improve offensive skills, contributing to overall better basketball performance. Let’s dive in!

6 Steps to Teach any Offensive Skill, Play, or Offense for Better Basketball

It’s often been said that basketball is the most over coached and under taught sport on the planet. In order to help change that, here are six progressive steps that can be used to teach any offensive skill, play, or offense.

  1. Introduce the Skill or Play

  • Start by introducing the specific offensive skill, play, or offense to the players.
  • Demonstrate the movements, positioning, and timing involved.
  • Use a coach or experienced player to demonstrate the skill correctly.
  • Alternatively, utilize a video clip that clearly shows the desired execution.
  • Help players form a mental picture of the skill or play being executed perfectly.
  1. Execute the Skill at a Slow Pace

  • Allow players to start executing the skill at a slow pace.
  • Ensure that all players have the opportunity to master the required techniques and mechanics.
  • Pay close attention to footwork, which often determines the success of a skill.
  1. Increase Execution Speed

  • Transition to executing the skill at game speed.
  • Focus on executing quicker and quicker.
  • Use highly specific and well-designed breakdown drills to accomplish this.
  • Simplify the drills to minimize overthinking and maximize execution speed.
  1. Repeat and Practice

  • For individual skills, emphasize repetition, repetition, and repetition.
  • For plays or offenses, combine multiple parts and involve more teammates.
  • Develop mental and physical quickness, teamwork, and coordination.
  • Example: Add the “picker” when teaching the pick and roll instead of driving around a stationary cone.
  1. Add Defensive Elements

  • Introduce defense to make the learning process more enjoyable.
  • Avoid skipping the previous steps and going directly to this one.
  • Focus on executing all the individual parts while reading defensive reactions.
  1. Apply in Game Situations

  • Incorporate the newly learned skill, play, or offense into actual game scenarios.
  • Utilize five-on-five situations to create a game-like environment.
  • Avoid overlooking or taking this step for granted.
  • Address any difficulties in carrying skills and actions from drills to game situations.

Remember to periodically review the steps even after progressing through all six. Continual improvement is always possible, regardless of skill level.


Related: 5 Skill Development Ideas


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1759 Five Skill Every Player Should Work on During the Summer


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Better Basketball: 5 Skill Development Ideas 

Better Basketball: 5 Skill Development Ideas 

Building a solid foundation in basketball skills is crucial for any player’s success on the court. Whether you’re a coach looking for fresh drills or a player eager to improve, these basketball skill development ideas will provide the tools needed to excel. From shooting techniques to defensive strategies, get ready to elevate your game with these practical and effective practice tips. Let’s dive in!

5 Skill Development Ideas for Basketball Practice

Believe it or not there used to be only one basketball season every year. Those players who had some extra time on their hands and wanted to play a little more would go to the closest park or city gym and play in pickup games. Sometimes those games were five-on-five full court but more often than not they would be half court three on three or four on four. Since only a relatively few players actually played in the off season, those that did were noticeably better than their peers when the official basketball season eventually started up again.

Of course, now things are noticeably different. There are two separate and distinct basketball seasons – school season and club season – and it seems that as soon as one ends the other begins immediately. As a result it’s very common for players to compete in upwards of 80 games a year! Some players benefit greatly from so many games while others just end up reinforcing already bad habits without improving at all.

If you are playing game after game after game and not improving like you want to or need to then it might be time to reevaluate your training schedule. Here are 5 things to consider when working out in the offseason. They are ideas adapted from Doug Lemov’s book for classroom teachers called “Practice Perfect.”

1. Encode Success

Fighting through adversity might make you mentally tougher and much more resilient but it’s not always the best way to develop basketball skills. I’m not saying everything you work on should be easy but instead of doing flashy, complicated drills focus on those things that are simple and game like.

Train yourself to be successful and once you have mastered a skill or movement then and only then move on to something more complicated. If possible, constantly look at pictures or watch videos of someone correctly executing the skill you’re trying to perfect. Think of it as “positive brainwashing.”

2. Practice the 20

The Pareto Principle states that 80 percent of your results will come from 20 percent of your actions.

Assuming that this principle is true, if you are serious about becoming a better player you should focus on getting real good at those things which produce the most results. If it doesn’t happen in a game – and often – why are you practicing it?

3. Objectives before Drills

The majority of young players that I know prepare for an individual skills workout by thinking: “Today I want to play these two shooting games and then do these ball handling drills, and then if somebody else is in the gym maybe we can get in a few games of one on one or two on two.”

Advanced players think something like this, “I’ve been missing slightly to the left lately so I need to work on my follow through and I can correct it by using this particular drill. Then since my crossover needs to be a little tighter I’m going to get out the cones and place them really close together so my ballhandling has to be tighter and quicker. I want to improve my attacking and finishing moves from the wing so I’m going to get someone else to come to the gym and defend me 25 times.” Notice the difference? It’s huge.

4. Make Your Strengths Even Stronger

The summer is a great time to add new skills and dimensions to your game but just make sure you don’t neglect the things you already do well.

I know a local high school girl who was an outstanding shooter but didn’t drive very well or very often. She evidently worked all summer on her attacking and finishing skills because when I saw her in college she was relentlessly attacking the rim. However, she never looked for her outside shot and when she did her shot looked completely broken. After an entire summer of working out she wasn’t a better player, just a different one!

5. Drill to Develop Skills

Scrimmage to Evaluate. Playing 60 games a summer is not going to help you develop a new skill or improve a weak one. What the games will do is give you the opportunity to implement those things you’ve been practicing.

If you’re not practicing during the week then you’re just playing on the weekends! Fun? Absolutely! But not necessarily conducive to becoming a better skilled and talented player.

 


Related: 5 Leadership Musts for Basketball Coaches


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1759 Five Skill Every Player Should Work on During the Summer


Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

6 Essential Workout Habits for Basketball Players

6 Essential Workout Habits for Basketball Players

As a coach, you understand that success is not solely determined by talent or skill, but also by consistent and effective training routines. Developing and maintaining proper workout habits is the cornerstone of athletic progress, enabling players to enhance their strength, endurance, agility, and overall performance. Join us as we delve into the significance of workout habits, share expert insights, and provide practical tips to help you and your team establish a solid foundation for success through dedicated and purposeful training.

6 Essential Workout Habits

Any serious player will surely tell you that there is a huge difference between just hanging out in the gym and actually working out. But what is that difference? How do you know if you’re taking the right approach and getting more out of your gym time than just fun? Here are 6 essential habits that can turn gym time into a productive workout?

Meticulously schedule every facet of your workout.

Plan out in advance the days, times, and length of your workouts as well as the skills you’ll be practicing. Decide beforehand what areas you want to improve and then map out drills that will help you achieve your objectives. Once the plan is made treat it like you’re going to work and don’t let anything keep you from carrying out your plan.

Use a workout partner.

Working out with someone else accomplishes three things. A) It forces you to be accountable. It’s hard to miss a workout or even take a short cut when someone else is counting on you. B) Practicing with someone else, even if it’s just a friend or a parent, allows you to use more complex drills; drills that require a passer, rebounder, or defender. C) Having a workout partner can add a competitive component to your sessions as you work to excel at every drill and to “beat” your partner.

Workouts should always include warming up and cooling down.

There are almost as many ways to warm up as there are players. I know players who swear by the benefits of active stretching and jogging while others are convinced they benefit most from jumping rope and stationary ball handling. The important thing is that you do something to elevate your core body temperature and to prepare your muscles for high intensity work. Afterwards, stretching for at least 10 minutes or more will help get rid of any lactic acid build up and will help reduce muscle soreness.

Keep a workout journal.

Write down everything – specific drills, repetitions, who you worked with, time spent, etc. Keeping detailed records will help make every practice session seem more important and will allow you to visually track your progress. Even more importantly, the information you record in your journal can and should be used to plan future workouts.

Do more than just shoot.

Working on improving your shot is absolutely necessary and should be taken very seriously. However, you mustn’t neglect everything else if you are serious about elevating your game. Current Clippers assistant and renowned skill development trainer Kevin Eastman says that every workout should include shooting, ball handling, and conditioning at the very least. If that advice is good enough for NBA players then its good advice for you too.

Use various speeds to accelerate improvement.

It may sound blasphemous to some players and coaches but “game speed” is not always the best speed. When skills are first being learned going slower is usually more effective than going too quickly. Then once the skill is learned the speed of the repetitions can be increased. As execution improves the speed continues to increase until it is actually faster than “game speed.” Eventually making things harder in practice will make things easier in games.

There’s nothing wrong with hanging out in the gym and socializing with your friends while you put up a few shots. To me it’s a lot more fun than playing video games or watching television and I know it would be for you too. However, if you’re serious about getting better then develop these 6 habits and spend some time hanging out and some more time working out!

 


Related: Basketball Shooting Workout


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources. All laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

10 Tips for Communicating Effectively with Youth Basketball Players

10 Tips for Communicating Effectively with Youth Basketball Players

As a youth basketball coach, one of the most important skills you can develop is effective communication with your players. Good communication can help your players feel more confident, engaged, and motivated, while poor communication can lead to confusion, frustration, and disengagement. Communicating with youth basketball players remains key to any team building and development.

Here are 10 tips to help you communicate effectively with your youth basketball players:

10 Tips for Communicating Effectively with Youth Basketball Players

  1. Be clear and concise: Use simple language and avoid jargon or complicated instructions. Make sure your players understand what you are asking them to do.
  2. Use positive language: Focus on what you want your players to do, rather than what you don’t want them to do. For example, say “keep your elbows in” instead of “don’t let your elbows stick out”.
  3. Provide feedback: Let your players know what they are doing well and what they can improve on. Be specific and provide examples.
  4. Use demonstrations: Show your players what you want them to do. This can be especially helpful for younger players who may not understand verbal instructions as well.
  5. Use visual aids: Use diagrams or videos to help explain concepts or strategies.
  6. Be patient: Youth players are still developing their skills and may need more time to understand what you are asking of them. Be patient and offer additional explanations or demonstrations as needed.
  7. Ask questions: Encourage your players to ask questions and clarify their understanding. This can help them feel more engaged and invested in the process.
  8. Use positive reinforcement: Praise your players for their efforts and progress. This can help build their confidence and motivation.
  9. Give players ownership: Let your players have a say in the team’s goals or strategies. This can help them feel more invested and engaged in the process.
  10. Listen to your players: Pay attention to your players’ feedback and concerns. This can help you identify areas where you may need to adjust your coaching style or strategy.

By using these tips, you can improve your communication skills as a youth basketball coach and help your players develop their skills and confidence on the court. Remember, effective communication is a key component of successful coaching at any level.


Related: 5 Essential Skills for Youth Basketball 


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources all laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

5 Essential Basketball Skills Every Youth Player Should Learn

5 Essential Basketball Skills Every Youth Player Should Learn

As a youth basketball coach, I’ve seen players of all levels and abilities. While there are many skills that can be valuable for players to learn, there are five essential skills that every youth player should focus on. In this post, we’ll discuss these five skills, along with specific tactics and reasoning for each one, and explain how they can be helpful for youth basketball players.

Essential Youth Basketball Skills to Develop

These five essential skills are critical for youth basketball players to learn. Ball handling, shooting, defense, passing, and rebounding are fundamental skills that players will use in every game.

Ball Handling

One of the most fundamental skills in basketball is ball handling. Without good ball handling skills, players will struggle to move around the court, protect the ball, and make passes.

To improve ball handling skills, coaches can encourage players to practice dribbling with both hands, practice changing direction while dribbling, and incorporate cone drills to work on agility and control.

Shooting

Shooting is another essential skill that all youth basketball players should learn. Accuracy is critical for players to contribute to their team and score points.

Coaches can help players improve their shooting skills by encouraging proper form, incorporating shooting drills, and helping players develop a consistent shooting routine.

Defense

A good defense can make a big difference in a basketball game. Youth basketball players should learn how to play good defense, which includes staying low, moving their feet, and keeping their eyes on the ball.

Coaches can help players improve their defensive skills by incorporating defensive drills, practicing closeouts, and encouraging communication on the court.

Passing

Passing is another essential skill that all youth basketball players should learn. Good passing skills can help players move the ball around the court, find open teammates, and create scoring opportunities.

Coaches can help players improve their passing skills by practicing different types of passes, emphasizing the importance of accuracy and timing, and incorporating passing drills.

Rebounding

Rebounding is an important part of basketball and can help a team gain an advantage on both ends of the court.

Coaches can help players improve their rebounding skills by teaching proper technique, encouraging box-outs, and incorporating rebounding drills into practice.

As coaches, we can help players develop these skills by incorporating specific drills and exercises into practice, emphasizing the importance of good technique and consistency, and providing positive feedback to encourage improvement. With these skills, youth basketball players can improve their performance and make valuable contributions to their teams.


Related: Top 10 Drills for Youth Basketball


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources all laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Top 10 Drills for Youth Basketball Players

Top 10 Drills for Youth Basketball Players

As a youth basketball coach, it’s essential to design drills that help your players develop the skills they need to succeed on the court. These drills should be challenging, fun, and age-appropriate. In this post, we’ll discuss the top 10 drills for youth basketball players, along with specific tactics and approaches coaches can use to ensure their players get the most out of each drill.

10 Youth Basketball Drills

Designing effective drills for youth basketball players is essential for helping them develop the skills they need to succeed on the court.

3-on-3 Half-Court Scrimmage

This drill is excellent for improving team play, communication, and defensive skills. Divide the team into two groups of three and have them play a half-court game with no dribbling. Encourage players to communicate with each other and work together to defend and score.

Full-Court Layup Drill

This drill helps players develop their speed and agility while practicing their layup technique. Have players line up at one end of the court, then sprint to the other end while dribbling and finishing with a layup. Repeat this drill several times, alternating which hand the players use to dribble.

Shooting Relay

This drill helps players improve their shooting accuracy and speed. Divide the team into two groups and have them stand at opposite ends of the court. Each player takes turns shooting and running to retrieve the ball. The first team to make all their shots and return to the starting line wins.

Zig-Zag Dribbling Drill

This drill helps players develop their ball-handling skills and improve their footwork. Set up cones in a zig-zag pattern on the court and have players dribble the ball through the cones while maintaining control and speed.

Defensive Slide Drill

This drill helps players improve their lateral movement and defensive skills. Have players start at one end of the court and slide laterally to the other end while staying low and keeping their eyes on the coach. Repeat this drill several times, alternating the direction players slide.

Basic Rebounding Drill

This drill helps players improve their rebounding skills and timing. Have one player stand under the basket while the coach shoots the ball from various angles. The player must jump and grab the rebound, then quickly pass the ball back to the coach.

Two-Ball Dribbling Drill

This drill helps players improve their ball-handling skills and coordination. Have players dribble two balls at the same time, alternating which hand each ball is in. Encourage players to keep their eyes up and maintain control of both balls.

Line Passing Drill

This drill helps players improve their passing accuracy and speed. Have players line up facing each other, then pass the ball back and forth while walking down the court. Encourage players to use different types of passes, such as chest passes and bounce passes.

Pick and Roll Drill

This drill helps players improve their teamwork and pick-and-roll skills. Have two players set up a pick-and-roll, with one player setting a screen and the other player dribbling and using the screen to get past a defender. Encourage players to communicate and work together to execute the play.

Hot Potato Drill

This drill helps players improve their reaction time and hand-eye coordination. Have players stand in a circle and pass the ball quickly to each other, trying to keep the ball away from a defender in the middle. The defender tries to steal the ball, and if they do, they switch places with the player who lost possession.


Related: Strength Training in Youth Basketball


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources all laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

The Importance of Strength Training for Youth Basketball Players

The Importance of Strength Training for Youth Basketball Players

Basketball is a physically demanding sport that requires strength, agility, and endurance. As a youth basketball coach, you know that your players need to be physically prepared to compete at their best. Strength training is a crucial component of physical preparation for basketball players of all ages. In this post, we’ll discuss the importance of strength training for youth basketball players and specific tactics and examples coaches can use to incorporate strength training into their team’s practice and games.

Benefits of Strength Training for Youth Basketball Players

Strength training offers a range of benefits for youth basketball players. It can improve overall strength and power, increase endurance, reduce the risk of injury, and enhance agility and coordination.

Strength training can also improve confidence and self-esteem, which can translate to improved performance on the court.

Incorporating Strength Training into Practice and Games

Coaches can incorporate strength training into their team’s practice and games in several ways. One way is to include strength exercises as part of the warm-up routine. Dynamic warm-up exercises that focus on balance and stability can also help to improve overall strength and reduce the risk of injury.

Another way to incorporate strength training into practice is to use bodyweight exercises such as push-ups, squats, and lunges. These exercises can be modified to suit players of all ages and skill levels and can be done without the need for specialized equipment.

Coaches can also incorporate strength training into their team’s games by using drills that require strength and power, such as rebounding drills or defensive drills that focus on quick lateral movements. These drills not only improve strength and power but also help players develop basketball-specific skills.

Building Team Culture through Strength Training

Strength training can also help to build a positive team culture and foster a sense of cohesion among players. Coaches can use strength training as an opportunity to encourage players to support each other and work together towards a common goal.

Strength training can also help to build confidence and self-esteem, which can improve players’ attitudes and approach to the game.

Incorporating strength training into youth basketball practice and games offers a range of benefits for players. It can improve overall strength and power, reduce the risk of injury, enhance agility and coordination, and build confidence and self-esteem.

Coaches can use strength training as an opportunity to build team culture and foster a sense of cohesion among players. By incorporating strength training into their team’s practice and games, coaches can help their players develop the physical and mental toughness they need to compete at their best.


Related: Role of Parents in Youth Basketball


Resources:



Youth Basketball Coaching Made Easy

If you coach a K-8th grade team, we have hundreds of resources all laid out in an easy-to-follow, step-by-step system to save you time and money. Check out coachingyouthhoops.com today!


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

A Half Court Offense Drill To Emphasize Defense

A Half Court Offense Drill To Emphasize Defense

Here is a great competitive half court offense drill that allows you to work on your offense while also emphasizing your defense. Teams play “live” 5-on-5 starting at half court. (If you have 12 players, you could have three groups and play 4-on-4).

Defensive team starts out by working to get a single stop. (A stop means gaining possession of the ball either by a steal, a defensive rebound, or by an offensive turnover.) After getting one stop, the defense then attempts to get two stops in a row, then three, then four and finally five straight stops.

If the offense scores then they get to play defense. The two teams alternate back and forth until one team gets five stops in a row.

The drill can also be done backwards with each team staying on defense until they get five straight stops. When both teams have stopped five straight then they compete to get four straight stops, then three, then two, then one

“Stops” A Half Court Offense Drill that Emphasizes Defense

Half court man defense versus halfcourt man offense. 5-on-5 with both the offense and defense playing “live.” This drill is done halfcourt only. Be sure to discuss with your defense your specific approach to switching screens.

The defense must get five stops in a row. A stop means getting possession of the ball or off of a turnover by the offense. The defense is allowed only one foul. If a second foul is committed, the five stops count resets to zero.

After five stops, the defense gets to switch to offense. The drill then begins again, but the switch counter goes from five to four. Each time the drill resets, the counter drops. This half court offense drill allows for an emphasis on half court defense.


Related: 3 Practice Drills to Develop Basketball Fundamentals


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1715 Combination Defense


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

3 Practice Drills to Develop Basketball Fundamentals

3 Practice Drills to Develop Basketball Fundamentals

One gripe you hear on social media, talk radio, and from various coaching outlets is the following: “The fundamentals of the game are lost!” The question then comes back to this: Why are basketball “fundamentals” lost? And if that truly is the case, what can be done to fix it?

As all coaches (and parents) know, what you emphasize is what you believe in. As coaches, if we do not emphasize the fundamentals then your players will not work on the fundamentals. The next question to this conundrum is what exactly are basketball “fundamentals”?

Fundamentals can be defined as the basics of the game, skills all players need to have to be successful basketball players. I believe the fundamentals center around three skills: shooting, passing, and dribbling. In our practices and drills, we strive to do things to improve our players abilities in these three areas. Below are 3 “fundamental” drills that help to teach these three skills with some fundamental principles.

Drills to Practice Basketball Fundamentals

Drill 1 (2 Foot 2 Hand Drill)

This is a super fundamental drill that will have players working on attacking a defender’s hip, landing on a 2 foot jump stop, and finishing strong through a padded defender.

basketball fundamentals

Drill 2 (4 on 3 Passing)

This drill brings in the lost art of the “pass fake.” In this drill, the  offense’s goal is to complete 10 clean passes without a defensive steal or deflection. The key is each offensive player must keep a foot on either the block or the elbow (whichever they were assigned). This also works on an important part of both offense and defense:communication.

basketball fundamentals

Drill 3 (Perfect Passing)

This is a great drill to make sure our passes are hitting our teammates in stride, it works on our communication, and we can even test how our players do in a little more difficult situation when we randomly changedirections in the middle of the drill.

basketball fundamentals

I hope you enjoyed looking through these three fundamental drills!


Kyle Brasher | Gibson Southern High School
Lady Titans Basketball Coach


Related: Focus on Fundamentals


Resources:



If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Better Basketball: 10 Points for On-Ball Defense

Better Basketball: 10 Points for On-Ball Defense

Basketball is a sport that requires both offensive and defensive skills. And while flashy scoring gets much of the attention, a solid defense is equally important to winning games. In basketball, one of the key aspects of defense is on-ball defense, which involves guarding the player with the ball and preventing them from scoring or passing effectively.

In this blog post, we’ll explore 10 fundamentals of on-ball defense according to coach Ernie Woods, including techniques, strategies, and tips for becoming a more effective defender on the court.

10 Points for On-Ball Defense

Ernie Woods has have long been recognized as having one of the best defensive minds in the game of basketball. The following 10 points come from the chapter entitled “On Ball Defense” from his book Advanced Basketball Defense.

    1. Ball pressure is the single most important element of team defense.
    2. To be successful, players must possess a working knowledge of the basic defensive concepts and fundamentals.
    3. “On Ball” defensive fundamentals are comprised of three basic components: Pressuring and attacking the player with the ball, containing a dribbler and attacking the picked up dribble.
    4. Pressuring the ball handler makes dribbling and passing more difficult, and increases the chances of an offensive mistake.
    5. When guarding a player with the ball, the defender should attack and take away the “Triple Threat” options by forcing the opponent into dribbling.
    6. The defenders should influence ball handlers to the closest sideline or baseline push point. In keeping the ball out of the middle of the court (“Red Zone”), it not only reduces the offensive operating area, but it also creates help side defense.
    7. On dribble penetration, it is important that the defender protect the “Elbows” and “Blocks”. Do not allow the dribbler penetration into the three second area.
    8. Defenders should constantly anticipate and immediately attack any player that picks up their dribble.
    9. Defenders must have a hand up and contest every shot. Since shooters know where the ball is going as soon as it leaves their hand, they must be boxed out.
    10. Taking a charge is a really big play in basketball. However, in taking a charge, players need to be taught to absorb contact by tucking their chin in and executing a shoulder roll.

Related: 10 Team Bonding Options


Resources:



  Practice Planner Live

Failing to prepare is preparing to fail! Quickly create, organize, & manage your practice plans all in one place to help win games.

Create detailed practice plans! Add drills, notes, diagrams, videos, & groups with an easy-to-use interface to create a detailed practice plan in no time!

Take a risk free,14-day trial at PracticePlannerLive.com today! No credit card required!

If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Becoming a Better Coach: Are You Sabotaging Your Players’ Success?

Becoming a Better Coach: Are You Sabotaging Your Players’ Success?

Other than parents, coaches have a bigger impact on the lives of young people than just about everyone else. As coaches we know and understand that fact and are often quick to point out to others how our influence has helped the weak become strong, the average become good, and the good become great. Even though we don’t publicly keep score, many of us take detailed mental notes of how many athletes are obviously better off both on and off the court because they participated in our program.

However, what many don’t realize or admit is that there have also been some athletes who are not better off because they were coached by us. In fact, some of these players leave us worse off than when they started!

How does that happen? The answer can often be found in the principle of self fulfilling prophecy which basically says that when someone strongly believes something about themselves, they often adjust their behavior to make those beliefs come true. Because of our position and influence, we as coaches often play a huge role in the development and nurturing of these beliefs even if we don’t realize it at the time.

How We Sabotage the Success of Your Own Players

We usually do this in four incremental steps. The results can either be an upward spiral that leads to improvement, fun, and success or a downward spiral that leads to stagnation, frustration, and failure.

Step 1: Early Impressions

The first step takes place when we form our early impressions and expectations of each of our players. Sometimes this is done during tryouts and other times it takes several days and even weeks of careful observance. Occasionally we even form our impressions and expectations based on the information given to us by others.

Regardless of exactly how and when it is done, we eventually establish a mental picture of the potential value and corresponding expectations of every one of our players.

Step 2: Revealing Our Expectations

The second step occurs when we both directly and indirectly reveal those expectations to our players. This happens directly by telling each player what you expect his or her role to be. Then, constantly telling them specific ways to expand those roles. Expectations can also be indirectly revealed as well by spending more time coaching the better players and less time with the others.

Many coaches also seem to naturally develop stronger, more personal relationships with their top players. That leaves more casual, business like relationships with the bottom of their roster. Soon, players know their worth to the team by how their coach interacts with them.

Step 3: The Weight of Those Expectations

The next step in the cycle finds the athletes responding either positively or negatively to the way they are treated. The special few, the ones author Tim Grover calls “relentless,” ignore the expectations and treatment of others because they have such high expectations of themselves.

However, the majority of players gradually start to mirror whatever the coach expects of them. Those with great expectations become great. Those with lesser expectations seem to get worse as the season progresses.

Step 4: Confirmation Bias

The fourth step takes place when the coach tells himself something like “I knew he would become one of our best players.” Or, “I’m not surprised. I knew she would never amount to much.” Once that happens, either higher or lower expectations get re-established and then revealed by the coach. The behavior of the athletes then adjusts to reflect the new expectations, and the entire four step process is started over.

Obviously not every player can be the team’s leading scorer or rebounder. But every player can be treated with respect and given the necessary support and encouragement to maximize his talents and to reach his full potential. Like it or not, nearly everything you say or do influences your players in one way or another.

Don’t be satisfied that you’ve had a positive impact on some of your players or even most of your players. Make the commitment that you won’t be satisfied until you’ve made a positive impact on all of your players.


Related: 9 Tips to Recognize a Good Practice Drill


Resources:



  Practice Planner Live

Failing to prepare is preparing to fail! Quickly create, organize, & manage your practice plans all in one place to help win games.

Create detailed practice plans! Add drills, notes, diagrams, videos, & groups with an easy-to-use interface to create a detailed practice plan in no time!

Take a risk free,14-day trial at PracticePlannerLive.com today! No credit card required!

If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

9 Tips to Recognize a Good Practice Drill

9 Tips to Recognize a Good Practice Drill

There are thousands of basketball drills available in videos, books, and on the internet these days. But how can you tell which one’s a good practice drill and which one isn’t? That’s among the most difficult aspects of practice planning for new basketball coaches. Sometimes, though, it’s as easy as finding a veteran coach and building off what they used to be successful.

Here are 9 tips to recognize a good basketball practice drill that I learned from ultra successful coach Burrall Paye.

Practice Drill Tip 1: Make It Game-Like

When I was in school I was always frustrated by the teacher who would teach us tons of stuff only to find out that none of it was on the test. The gym is your classroom and the games are the test.

Help your students (players) pass the test (win the game) by teaching them what they need to know and giving them a preview of how to apply it. If it doesn’t happen in the game don’t do it in your team practices.

Practice Drill Tip 2: Make It Relevant

There are a lot of coaches who fill their practices with drills that they ran when they were in high school or college or with “favorite” drills that they have picked up along the way – even though those same drills have absolutely nothing to do with their current offense, defense, or coaching philosophy.

If a drill is not applicable or transferable to what you are trying to teach your current teams then don’t do it!

Practice Drill Tip 3: Make It Progressive

If you can lift 10 pounds in September and are still lifting 10 pounds in August you might be lifting all the time but you’re not getting any stronger. The same is true with your drill work in practice.

The best drills grow right along with your players and give them the opportunity to improve over the course of the entire season.

Practice Drill Tip 4: Make It Competitive

One of the most important and productive things you can teach your players is how to be competitive and the use of competitive drills is a great way to do this.

Whether your players are competing against another player or team, competing against themselves or competing against the clock they will benefit from increasing their competitive level as well as their skill level. Most non competitive drills are useless.

Practice Drill Tip 5: Incorporate Conditioning

Ask yourself this – how much does your team have to run at the end of practice to improve their conditioning? If it’s a lot then you are not using enough drills that contain a built in conditioning component.

Keep everyone moving, reduce standing around and remember that just about every half court drill can be turned into a full court drill with just a little tweaking.

Practice Drill Tip 6: Don’t Be Too Complicated

Great drills should make your players stretch their levels of skill, concentration and teamwork and in many cases should be tougher than an actual game situation.

However, the drills should not be impossible to master, especially at lower levels where constant perceived failure could permanently damage a player’s confidence.

Practice Drill Tip 7: Keep Groups Small

We all know and accept the fact that repetition is the mother of all learning. Then why do we run drills where lots of players are standing around watching and then only get a few repetitions when it is finally their turn?

Instead, divide the team in half and run the same drill at both ends of the court so there is less standing and more practicing. Better yet, utilize all your assistant coaches and managers and organize a series of timed drill stations where every player is constantly working and learning.

Practice Drill Tip 8: Incorporate Decision Making

If you can teach your players to be competitive and make good decisions you’ve already won half the battle. This is difficult for those coaches who want complete control over every possession and every player. That said, teaching kids how to make good decisions is synonymous with teaching them how to play.

Since there are a limited number of timeouts, at some time in every game your players will need to make some decisions on their own. It’s better that they learn how to do that in practice instead of “winging it” when the game is on the line.

Practice Drill Tip 9: Keep It Fun

Granted, not all drills need to be fun but at least they should be interesting and challenging. This is especially true with younger players and as the season progresses. LA Clippers assistant coach Kevin Eastman says that fatigue and boredom are the two biggest practice killers.

Be creative. You wouldn’t want to eat chicken cooked the exact same way every single night for 6 months! So of course, your players don’t want to run the exact same closeout drill every single night of the season!

Don’t fall into the trap of drilling just for the sake of drilling. Make sure each drill is run with a purpose and fits into your practice objective for that particular day. If you follow the 9 tips above you can become what Kevin Eastman calls a “skill coach not a drill coach.”


Related: 6 Tips to Improve Your Quick Hitters


Resources:



  Practice Planner Live

Failing to prepare is preparing to fail! Quickly create, organize, & manage your practice plans all in one place to help win games.

Create detailed practice plans! Add drills, notes, diagrams, videos, & groups with an easy-to-use interface to create a detailed practice plan in no time!

Take a risk free,14-day trial at PracticePlannerLive.com today! No credit card required!

If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Attitude: Key to Basketball Success

Attitude: Key to Basketball Success

This much we know is certain: winning teams have common characteristics that separate them from losing teams. It’s no secret. As a matter of fact, I would say they are not just characteristics; they are actually high character-driven traits. Perhaps among the most important of these winning basketball traits is attitude.

Basketball Attitude

There is just not enough practice time in a given season at any level for skill development. A player truly grows through being what I call a gym rat. A gym rat is someone who lives in the gym or on the courts working on their game.

Gym Rats are continuing to decrease every year in my opinion. I feel that players have come accustomed to coaches organizing their skill time opportunities for them. As if coaches don’t set times and opportunities for players then the growth often doesn’t happen. We have now become a generation of convenience and having things done for us. I am sure if players could just purchase an App to get better they would.

At the college level, we recruit kids with high character and value hard work. Our job is often easier then coaches who coach high school or younger when it comes to skill development. For example, there were times this past summer the doors closed at midnight in our gym. I am telling you this not to brag, but to provide the results of the hard work that happened. We won our first state title in school history with having 4 all-conference players this past season.

Building Basketball Attitude in the Summer

Summer development benefits the whole team. You cannot simply win with one or two players that put up a lot points. For example, when I coached HS I had player scored 530 points in his senior season. We completed the season with only 5 wins. Why? Not enough scoring from others and easy to defend of our tactics.

Take a look at the winning teams in the last few years: Villanova, Golden State, North Carolina, Gonzaga, and even our team this season. If you view these team’s statistics, you would notice a trend of 4 to 5 players scoring in double figures every game. I believe role players still exist in some capacity and often are glue kids for a team, but coaching basketball is easy when you have multiple players that can score. It’s hard to defend and scout. Also, I think as a coach you can keep your offensive system very simple with many players that can score. You allow them to create and score on reads and reaction. We were able to complex our defense this season, which made it very difficult for other teams to compete with us.

The more commitment you get from players in the summer, especially dedication in skill development that team becomes harder to defend. Better players and deeper bench equals better practices as well. Practices become more competitive with players challenging each other for minutes. Summer development for all equals better results during season play.

Reward Team Attitude and Effort

In his book Extreme Dreams Depend on TeamsPat Williams says the following about rewarding your basketball team’s attitude and effort:

The natural tendency of leaders and coaches is to reward individual achievements. The problem is that when teams succeed, it is so often the result of selflessness and sacrifice on the part of people who truly “think team” and never get the glory. So the job of the leader or coach is to dig a little deeper, look beyond the flashy accomplishments of the stars on the team, and finds ways to acknowledge and reward the hod carriers and role-players. Yes, we should acknowledge individual achievement – but we should also recognize the team as a whole – and especially those self-effacing, self-sacrificing team players who make their contribution without making headlines


Related: Great Quotes for Basketball Coaches on Attitude


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1614 What a Basketball Coach Wants


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.


Looking for some Great Team Gifts? 

Head over to CandiceGriffyDesigns.com and get 15% off with the promo code: TEACHHOOPS15

Sports Jersey Portraits

Hand painted jersey portraits make a great gift for Senior Night or Banquets.  They have worked hard and pushed themselves to the limit physically and emotionally.  Give them a gift that will be cherished long after they graduate.
The 10 Million Dollar Basketball Skill Set

The 10 Million Dollar Basketball Skill Set

Let’s say at this stage in your career your skills are at point A and your goal is to get those same skills to point B. What is the quickest way to get your basketball skill set there? There is really only one answer and it is daily, repetitious, and purposeful practice!

Purposeful means that you are following a proven and workable plan. Repetitious means you are practicing the desired skill over and over and over again. Those two are the easy parts of the formula. It’s the daily requirement that’s the stumbling block!

The 10 Million Dollar Basketball Skill Set

At first thought it seems like shooting 2100 jump shots on a Saturday would be the same as shooting 300 shots a day for 7 straight days but it’s not. It’s the daily consistency that is going to strengthen your muscle memory and ultimately improve that skill. The same is true with passing, ball handling, post moves, defensive techniques, etc.

Think about this for a second:

If you take a penny and double it every day for 31 days, you’ll soon have more than 10 million dollars. However, if you only double it every other day for 31 days, you’ll wind up with $163.00. And if you choose to only add seven cents every Saturday instead of worrying about it every day you will finish the month with 29 cents. Ten million dollars versus $163.00 versus 29 cents.

Pete Maravich, Larry Bird, Michael Jordan, Kevin Durrant, and Chris Paul are just a few of the many professional basketball players whose daily work ethics are legendary. Sometimes we see players like these and think to ourselves, “Well, if I made tons of money to play in the NBA, I’d work out hard every day too!” They don’t work out every day because they’re successful. . . .they’re successful because they work out every day!

Daily Work Takes Sacrifice

It’s not easy working on your game every day. On some days you’re going to be more tired than usual and on other days your friends are going to insist that you hang out with them instead of spending time in the gym. You have to have an extraordinary amount of self discipline to ignore all of the distractions that constantly tempt you from doing what’s important. (It might help you memorize the quote, “The things that matter the most should never be at the mercy of things that matter the least.”)

What is easy is telling yourself that missing a day every now and then is okay and that you’ll make it up some other time. The first time you miss you feel a little guilty about it, but you soon get over it. Then before you know it you’re missing more and more days without even thinking twice about it. Soon you decide just to do all your extra skill work just on Saturdays and you know what that gets you.

So I guess the question you have to ask yourself is, “Do I want a $10 million skill set or a 29 cent skill set?

Only you can answer that question and only you can do something about it!


Related: Better Basketball – The 10/50 Rule for Improvement


Resources:


Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Ep 1614 What a Basketball Coach Wants


If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.


Looking for some Great Team Gifts? 

Head over to CandiceGriffyDesigns.com and get 15% off with the promo code: TEACHHOOPS15

Sports Jersey Portraits

Hand painted jersey portraits make a great gift for Senior Night or Banquets.  They have worked hard and pushed themselves to the limit physically and emotionally.  Give them a gift that will be cherished long after they graduate.