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You can save Thousands of dollars off the Full Curriculum (Over $4870 if you bought each program that makes up the Full Membership Individually).

These Teach Hoops Deals are a SPECIAL DEAL. If you go to the Site, you will not SEE the Discounted PRICES.

P.S. The Full Curriculum Consists of SO much

1.    Basketball Roadmap.  This walks you through the Pre-season, Season, Post Season and Off Season with Drills, handouts, videos, much more…Total Value $540.00

2.    Offense and Defensive  Curriculum (Levels 1-4) designed for Coaches to compete at youth high school – Total value $500.00

3.    Building. Program Course (Levels 1-4)  How to turn any program into a winning program from a nationally renowned coach – Total value $325

4.    ON COURT CLINICS.  100’s of hours of online clinics ( 50 from the last 2 years) with challenging drills, concepts from the top coaches in the country  – $1000.00

5.    Practice planning Courses.   100’s of hours of videos, templates and handouts to prepare for your practice. Total Value $475

6.    Plays, Handouts, Drills, Playbooks.  It will walk you through the process.  Too many to count (Video & Printable PDF’s) Total Value $700

7.    Team Building and Coaching during Covid (Video & Printable PDF) Total Value $350

8.    Weight Training, Youth Basketball, Individual Workouts (Video & Printable PDF) Total Value $480

9.    Monthly Office Hours and One on One Mentoring with a Nationally Ranked High School Coach. Total Value $500 10.   A Private Basketball Community of like minded coaches Total Value : Priceless

See how the program will transform your coaching career like it has done for countless Youth, High School, and College coaches!

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Top 10 Basketball Movies

Top 10 Basketball Movies

As the days of summer heat up, stay cool inside and watch some classic basketball movies! Here’s my top 10 basketball movies and a few honorable mentions.

For Free Basketball drills, videos, practice plans and much more CLICK HERE

Top 10 Basketball Movies

Honorable Mention #1: Teen Wolf (1985)

This might be a stretch, as far as basketball scenes, but I have fond memories of watching this my senior year in high school.  “A struggling high school student with problems discovers that his family has an unusual pedigree when he finds himself turning into a werewolf.”

Honorable Mention #2: Like Mike (2002)

The revolution of the Air Jordan brand helped this movie become a cult classic. “A 14-year-old orphan becomes an NBA superstar after trying on a pair of sneakers with the faded initials “M.J.” inside.”

Honorable Mention #3: Semi-Pro (2008)

I could not put Anchorman on this list so Semi-Pro had to do. “Jackie Moon, the owner-coach-player of the American Basketball Association’s Flint Michigan Tropics, rallies his teammates to make their NBA dreams come true.”

Honorable Mention #4: Blue Chip (1994)

Not sure this deserves to be on the list but it shows the corruption of college basketball. “A college basketball coach is forced to break the rules in order to get the players he needs to stay competitive.”

#10 Love and Basketball (2000)

I had to list one romantic, date night movie. “In 1981 in L.A., Monica moves in next door to Quincy. They’re 11, and both want to play in the NBA, just like Quincy’s dad.”

#9 The Fish that Saved Pittsburg​h (1979)

A cult classic that everyone should watch at least once, not to mention it has a young Julius Irving! “The Pittsburgh basketball team is hopeless. Maybe with the aid of an astrologer, and some new astrologically compatible players, they can become winners.”

#8 White Men Can’t Jump (1992) 

A movie that is referenced a lot in mainstream media.  “Two basketball hustlers join forces to double their chances.”

#7 He Got Game (1998) 

A great movie showing the pressure of family and basketball in today’s society. “A basketball player’s father must try to convince him to go to a college so he can get a shorter sentence.”

#6 Fast Break (1979 for us old people)

Another favorite movie from my childhood.  “David Greene is a New York basketball enthusiast, who wants to coach. He is then offered the coaching job at a small Nevada college. He brings along some players, who are a bit odd.”

#5 Glory Road (2006)

A historic story that changed our game forever. “In 1966, Texas Western coach Don Haskins led the first all-black starting line-up for a college basketball team to the NCAA national championship.”

#4 Hoop Dreams (1994)

The only documentary on the list and one of my all-time favorites. “A film following the lives of two inner-city Chicago boys who struggle to become college basketball players on the road to going professional.”

#3 Coach Carter (2005) 

A story of a coach who puts the game in perspective.  “Controversy surrounds high school basketball coach Ken Carter after he benches his entire team for breaking their academic contract with him.”

#2 Space Jam (1996) 

I love this movie and thought it was a great twist of live action from Michael Jordan, one of my favorite players, and cartoons. “Michael Jordan agrees to help the Looney Toons play a basketball game vs. alien slavers to determine their freedom.”

#1 Hoosiers (1986)

This movie gives every high school player a dream of winning it big.  I remember the day I watched this movie for the first time as a freshman in college.  I wanted to live that dream and did it with 3 state titles!  “A coach with a checkered past and a local drunk train a small town high school basketball team to become a top contender for the championship.”

For Free Basketball drills, videos, practice plans and much more CLICK HERE!

Related: The BEST Basketball Coaching Podcasts

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The BEST Basketball Coaching Podcasts

The BEST Basketball Coaching Podcasts

Where can you find the best basketball coaching podcasts? I have always loved listening to podcast and especially podcasts that would help my basketball coaching. I look for podcast that not only inspire me, but also are inspirational, interesting and very entertaining.

Look no further! Every basketball coaching podcast you need is listed here! Some of the podcasts will be X’s and O’s others might talk about the psychological part of the game.

I like to listen to podcasts while I’m in the car, mowing the lawn or walking my dogs around he neighborhood. They’re perfect to fit into your day at any point when you are doing a task that doesn’t require your full attention….which during the Covid process is most of the time!

These are in no specific order…..

The Best Basketball Coaching Podcasts

1. Elevated (Click Here)

This is a new podcast but is by Drew Maddux and Virgil Herring and they discuss the extreme importance of mindset as it relates to sports, business and everything in between. They have a great book by the same name GET IT HERE

2. Basketball Coach Unplugged.(Click Here)

This is a shameless plug for my own podcast, but I am really proud of it and it comes out 5 days a week. It is a mixture of Coaching tips, interviews, Drills, X’s and O’s and everything in between. This Podcast will discuss basketball coaching with Coach Steve Collins. Coach Collins will do this with interviews and on topic discussions. (Discussion will revolve around basketball topics such as: Offense, Defense, Motivation, Team Building, Youth Basketball, High School Basketball, college basketball and much more…) We will publish weekly shows at 6:00 am….. Please check out our site if you like our podcast.

3. Coaching U Podcast (Click Here)

This podcast is an extension of the Coaching U education and training program. Coach Brendan Suhr moves the lessons off of the court and into your earbuds with interviews of coaches on their career journeys, coaching philosophies and challenges they have overcome. Weekly podcast featuring the best coaches in the world hosted by 2-Time NBA World Champion, Brendan Suhr.Each episode Coach Suhr and his guests give you insight into some of the best and newest trends, techniques, philosophies and lessons from not only the game of basketball; but also in leadership, culture, professional development and life.

4. High School Hoops: (Click Here)

A Discussion all about being and coaching Basketball at the High School Level Scrimmage, Preparation, Practice Planning, Parents, Getting your Players to Play Hard, and everything in betweenMUCH MORE….

5. Conversations With Coach George Raveling (Click Here)

Coach Raveling is considered by most as the godfather of college basketball coaching. On his podcast, Coach Raveling shares lessons for personal and professional growth through his conversations with other coaches. This is truly a hidden gem that I found several years ago…

6. 1 Question Leadership Podcast (Click Here) 

The 1.Question Leadership Podcast is designed to highlight executive and organizational leadership with a heavy emphasis on college athletics. 1.Question is primarily hosted by @TaiMBrown, but features occasional guest hosts.

7. No Stupid Questions (Click here)

Stephen Dubner and Angela Duckworth have spent years exploring the weird and wonderful ways in which humans behave — Dubner as the host of Freakonomics Radio, Duckworth as a research psychologist and author of Grit. They both like to ask a lot of questions, and have come to believe there’s really no such thing as a stupid one. With No Stupid Questions, they put this belief to the test, with conversations ranging from friendship and parenting to immortality and whether dogs are better than people. The resulting podcast is incisive, humane, and occasionally charming. New episodes each week. No Stupid Questions is a production of the Freakonomics Radio Network.

8.  The 5 Minute Basketball Coaching Podcast(Click Here)

It is a short looking into coaching basketball and basketball drills, plays, practices, tips and much more.

9.  Hidden Gem (No Pun Intended) IDAHO BASKETBALL Coaching (Click Here)

Interviews about coaching high school basketball in the Gem State. If you are a high school basketball coach and would like to talk hoops, send a DM on Twitter or email at Idahobasketballcoachingpodcast@gmail.com.

10. Positive University Podcast with Jon Gordon. (Click HERE)

Positive inspiration and encouragement to help you overcome your challenges and make a greater impact! Hosted by bestselling author, Jon Gordon

Books by Jon Gordon. The Garden. Energy Bus Staying Positive

Bonus;  Here are some Bonus Basketball Coaching Podcasts and a few that are just fun.

Coaching Culture The podcast for leaders in athletics. Sharing practical ideas on how to build character and leadership with a like-minded community.

Teacher Side Gig Do you have a side gig? I have colleagues who drive for Lyft/Uber, work in the service industry, clean houses and businesses, run online businesses, drive trucks, and work in all sorts of other industries during the Summer AND school year. Some have even left teaching because their other job pays more and provides better benefits.

Greatest Game Podcast
The Greatest Games Podcast. Our intention is to create a light and fun environment where we can just talk hoops, and hopefully offer some wisdom to young coaches and seasoned coaches alike about some of the lessons we have learned along the way. We really appreciate you coming by.

A Pen and a Napkin:  Great interviews and inspiration to take you on this great journey of coaching

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Favorite Basketball Practice Drills

Favorite Basketball Practice Drills

Developing a practice plan can be one of the most daunting tasks for a coach at any level. Coaches need to consider the talent of their team when assembling the plan. They also need to keep in mind how they want their team to improve over the course of the season. That improvement gets jumpstarted in practice with targeted drills. Coaches often have a set of their favorite basketball practice drills aimed to do just that.

Here are Coach Steger’s 2 Favorite Practice Drills and a couple of videos below to show their use.

 

Basketball Practice Drills: Closeout

Basketball Practice Drills

The first basketball practice drill that holds a great deal of value is a basic close out drill. This drill should be a regular for any team playing man-to-man defense. In addition, this drill aids in the instruction of help-side defense.

In this drill, two players start on the floor, occupying the wings. The defenders wait in a line beneath the rim and one positions himself in the “help side” spot in the lane. The drill begins with a skip pass from one wing to the other. The defender is expected to run from his help side position to close out on the shooter.

This drill can use a coach as the passer, or rotate players into that position. Coaches should emphasize defensive placement and positioning when integrating this drill. The close out defender should not over-run the shooter, but stop just before with one hand up.

This drill can be altered to force the shooter to drive baseline. The drill can incorporate another defender at that point, who also moves into help side positioning.

 

Basketball Practice Drills: DeMatha Finishing Drill

Basketball Practice Drills

The next of Coach Steger’s favorite basketball practice drills is the DeMatha Finishing drill. This drill can be particularly valuable as both a practice drill and as a pregame warmup drill.

This drill pits two players against one another in a simple clash of offense and defense. It’s a high-impact, fast-paced drill where the offensive player attacks the basket and the trailing defender needs to recover. The drill features two lines and usually a coach for passing. Players can stand in for the coaches as passers if need be.

The drill itself can be situated in a number of different spots on the floor. Where the drill starts can be dictated by the coach and what the team needs are.

The drill itself is simple. The passer feeds the offensive player, who must finish at the rim from their starting point. The offensive player can try   a dunk or layup. The defender, meanwhile, must contest the shot as best they can. Physical play can be encouraged for the defense to help the offense improve finishing through contact.

 

Related: 3 Favorite Basketball Practice Warm Up Drills

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep: 376 3 Favorite Practice Drills from Coach Steger

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Coaching Interview with Marc Skelton

Coaching Interview with Marc Skelton

The TeachHoops.com community connects coaches throughout the nation and all over the world. In this basketball coaching interview, Coach Collins connects with Coach Marc Skelton to discuss his basketball journey and his approach to the game.

Coaching Interview: Marc Skelton

Marc Skelton is a former all-state basketball guard from Derry, New Hampshire. He graduated from Northeastern University, then served two years in the Peace Corps in Moldova. Skelton holds a master’s degree in education and Russian studies from Columbia University.

Skelton teaches history at Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School in the Bronx. He’s coached the boys’ basketball team there since 2007, winning two citywide championships and one statewide championship.

Coaching Interview: March Skelton’s Favorite Drill

coaching interview marc skelton

Coach Skelton reveals in this coaching interview that his favorite drill one he calls “Popeye.” In this drill, a lone shooter spends at least one minute attempting to find the right angle for a shot that only touches the backboard and net. After a set amount of time, the shooter switches sides.

The drill continues with a dribble progression from there. The shooter uses a ball fake, then attacks with the dribble. The shooter is seeking the same “Popeye” shot off the dribble that they’d found in the stationary portion of the drill.

Check out the full interview below!

Related: Basketball Coach Interview With Eric Bridgeland

Resources:

Here’s a link to Coach Skelton’s bookPounding the Rock: Basketball Dreams and Real Life in a Bronx High Schoolon Amazon!

PDF Downloads:

Popeye Hall Court Offense Drills

Cardinals Horns Half Court Offense Set 

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Additional YouTube Links



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10 Ways to Evaluate a Basketball Game

10 Ways to Evaluate a Basketball Game

Coaches always need to consider data when evaluating their team’s latest performance. That data often instructs what the focus might be for the next practice. But any given basketball game provides hundreds of potential data points. These contests also vary wildly given external and uncontrollable factors. So here’s a look at 10 Ways to Evaluate a Basketball Game.

10 Ways to Evaluate a Basketball Game

  1. Turnover Margin
  2. Rebounding Margin
  3. Field Goal Attempts
  4. Shooting Percentage
  5. Free Throw Attempts
  6. Defensive Effectiveness
  7. 3-Point Game
  8. Floor Game
  9. Assist Margin
  10. Momentum

The Breakdown

These 10 ways to evaluate a basketball game may seem arbitrary but they each focus on specific production.

Turnover margin and rebounding margin both indicate how well your team is controlling the basketball. Naturally, your team wants to limit turnovers on offense and leverage turnovers on defense. The same is true with rebounding. If your team is securing more missed shots, then your team has more opportunities to score.

Tracking those scoring opportunities are important as well. Considering no team will ever make every single shot it takes, having more total shots shifts the odds in your team’s favor. However, not all shot attempts are created equal. Your team should focus on quality shots.

Offense

Having quality shot attempts will improve your team’s field goal percentage. This efficiency stat stands as a key market for in-game success. Furthermore, your team should be look to leverage your best shooter while minimizing the weakest ones.

Free Throw Attempts stand among the highest percentage shots available, so piling up those tries are key. But it’s not enough to get the attempts, great teams make their free throws at a high clip.

Defense

For defensive effectiveness, your team should look to limit the opponent’s scoring opportunities. What’s more, your defense should make it a goal to limit opposing players to no more than 10-15 points.

The three-point game stands as an opportunity to leverage effective offensive play. Look to get your best distance shooters open shots while preventing the opposing team from similar opportunities. Your defense should force opposing shooters into creating their own offense rather than standing still and hoisting from deep.

Your team’s floor game consists of getting loose balls, 50-50 balls, taking charges, saving the ball, etc. These moments can be hidden on a traditional stat sheet, but they create additional opportunities for the team.

The team should always look to help each other and create offensive opportunities for teammates. Creating those opportunities stresses opposing defenses. Likewise, keeping the opposing team from creating a similar offensive flow hurts their rhythm on that end as well.

And each of these builds to swinging the game’s momentum in your favor.

Related: Conducting Effective Basketball Tryouts

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep: 382 10 Ways to Evaluate a Basketball Game

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3 Levels of Basketball Mastery for Players and Coaches

3 Levels of Basketball Mastery for Players and Coaches

The internet holds a seemingly unlimited supply of resources for basketball players and coaches. But in an effort to gain mastery of the sport, players and coaches might need to turn to unlikely sources of information.

Basketball Mastery

LEVEL 1: COGNITIVE MASTERY

I see this all the time in my math classroom.  A student will see or hear something and they will think that they mastered it.   But in reality, understanding is only the first step toward mastery.  You have seen it with your players.  ” I got this coach” but when they try it in a game or practice it does not work.  It takes repetition and working on those skills to really understand your body movements.  “Repetition is the mother of skill”

LEVEL 2 OF MASTERY: EMOTIONAL MASTERY

“Emotional mastery is where you start linking consequences and doing. You act on what you know instead of just know it. When you add emotion like pain or pleasure to repetition, the link becomes stronger and the action more automatic”.   For example if your player does a action ( IN my world its a turnover )….They are going to get a negative reaction from my entire coaching staff.  Pretty soon, they know not to turn the ball over.

Now, apply this concept to your team. Maybe you kept the wrong player,  but you ignored what your instincts tried to tell you. What happened ? I bet you had enough pain from that experience that you think more carefully the next time you pick a team?. “But even if you’ve been burned once, does that mean you never get burned again? No. People repeat the same mistakes over and over because they haven’t yet associated enough pain with the problem, which holds them back from reaching the last level of mastery: physical mastery.”

LEVEL 3 MASTERY: PHYSICAL MASTERY

“With enough repetition, enough emotion, we can get to physical mastery Physical mastery, you don’t have to think about it, you just do it. It’s automatic. No extra effort required. This is the level of true mastery”.

We have all been there on the court when we just play the game and everything comes easily…You do not have to think about setting the screen and rolling to the basket is has become second nature.  It is our goal as coaches to get this level.  Where we have coached enough, felt the ups and downs, and just know what to do for our teams.

Let TEACHOOPS.COM be that for you!

*Quoted material from Tony Robbins (www.tonyrobbins.com)

Related: Developing Your Coaching Philosophy

Resources:

If you found this useful, don’t forget to check out additional blog posts at TeachHoops.com. Also, check out TeachHoops on FacebookTwitterInstagram and YouTube.

Basketball Coaching Interview with Gene Durden

Basketball Coaching Interview with Gene Durden

One of the most engaging aspects of the TeachHoops.com community is the ability to connect with coaches throughout the nation and all over the world. In this basketball coaching interview, Coach Collins connects with Coach Gene Durden to discuss his basketball journey and his approach to the game.

Basketball Coaching Interview

Coach Durden enters his 34th year coaching at the high school level this coming season. Currently, Durden coaches the Buford Lady Wolves. He’s headed that program for 15 years. During his time, Duden-led teams sport eight state championships in three different classifications. His teams have played in 10 of the last 12 state championship games. Furthermore, Durden’s Buford Lady Wolves have four straight state championships in class 5A. 

In addition to his coaching duties, Durden teaches Personal Fitness and Team Sports at Buford High School.

Prior to his time at Buford, Durden coached at Dade County High School in Trenton, GA for 14 years. His Lady Wolverines team won seven Region Championships and competed in 13 AA State Tournaments. His teams competed in three Final Fours, and in three AA State Championship games.

In this interview, Durden discusses the three parts to becoming a complete player. He lists preparation of the body, skill development, and play of the game as those three parts. He says individual players are made in the offseason, whereas teams are made during the season.

Check out Coach Collins’ coaching interview with this high school basketball legend, Gene Durden!

Related: Basketball Coaching Interview with Liam Flynn

Resources:

 

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Open Gym Rules and Games

Open Gym Rules and Games

Open gyms provide basketball coaches with a good look at potential talent for a new team. Although normally unstructured, an effective open gym needs rules and games in order for coaches to get the best look at the assembled talent.

Open Gym Rules and Games

One of the most difficult aspects of coaching remains the integration of unstructured time either in practice or during preseason. Too often, open gyms lead to players not working hard and poor decisions being made. It’s rare that an open gym features any kind of meaningful defense.

These runs end up looking so different from a regular season game that it’s sometimes hard to recognize your team.

But players love the freedom of an Open Gym set up.

What our basketball program did several years ago was implement a set of rules or games players can use to improve specific skills during an open gym.  They can play regular 5-on-5 and then pick a couple of these rules.

I remember the days of playing entire games during the summer and only using my “weaker” hand or only shooting baseline jumpers. I was trying to work on specific skills while still playing with my friends. (Those were the days when we used to go to the park and play, bring our boom box, and the big milk jug of water.  Remember those days…)

That is how with the help of other coaches I came up with the MAGIC 25.  Let me know if I am missing anything? ( steve@teachhoops.com)

Here are the Magic 25 Open Gym Rules and Games

  1. No Dribble 5-on-5
  2. Zone On Makes, Man On Misses 5-on-5
  3. 5-on-5 Hockey (ball has to be dribble across half court by the person who rebounds it)
  4. 5-on-5 Run an Action
  5. Beep Beep 5 on 5 (Have to shoot in 5 seconds)
  6. Everyone must Touch before you can score.
  7. Post must touch
  8. Weak-hand Layup is worth 3-Points
  9. 1-2-3- Paint shots are 1 point, 3’s are worth 2, mid-range is worth 3 points
  10. NBA Three is worth 4 Points
  11. No 3 point shots- everything is worth 2 points
  12. Everyone must cross Half Court if not the Offense Keeps the Ball, vice versa Offense doesn’t cross everyone the Basket doesn’t count.
  13. 10 Minute Games
  14. Games to 1, 3, 5, 7 Points
  15. 21 players 3 Teams Of 7
  16. No dribbles on Offense until the ball get inside the 3 point line
  17. No inbound on Made basket
  18. Every Foul is one Free Throw
  19. No ball screens
  20. After each make you get to run an Out of Bounds Play under ( 1 shot)
  21. Switch all screens
  22. Offense must score on ball screen or post pass
  23. Must dribble only with your “weak” hand
  24. Offense can stay on offense even on a made if they get the ball.
  25. Must switch the type of defense you run each possession

What am I missing?  Email me at steve@teachhoops.com

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Basketball Coaching Interview with Liam Flynn

Basketball Coaching Interview with Liam Flynn

One of the most engaging aspects of the TeachHoops.com community is the ability to connect with coaches throughout the nation and all over the world. In this basketball coach interview, Coach Collins talks with basketball coaching with Liam Flynn in this wide ranging interview.

Basketball Coaching Interview: Liam Flynn

A brief version of Liam’s resume is below:

His International Experience includes NBA Consultant, Coach in the German Bunderliga and New Zealand NZNBL.

He sports six years of Australian NBL Coaching experience. He was an assistant coach with the Townsville Crocodiles from 2010-2012. In addition, he assisted with the Adelaide 36ers from 2008-2010.

Flynn has 15 years of State League/ABA Coaching Experience. With the Sturt Sabres, Townsville Heat, Southern Districts Spartans.

He has 12 years of experience with State Teams. Such as: QLD U/18 Boys, SA Metro U/16 Boys & U/18 Boys; South Australia U/20 Men

Flynn also has 20 years experience at Junior Representative Level, with Sturt (SA), Southern Districts (QLD) – U/12s through to U/20s

He holds a Masters in Sports Coaching from University of Queensland, as well as a NCAS Level 2 Coaching Accreditation.

In the coaching interview below, Coach Collins and Coach Flynn discuss basketball practice planning, positioning, and what he looks for in a player. Check it out!

Click here for Coach Liam Flynn Twitter!

Related: Basketball Coaching Interview with Jim Boone

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

PDF Download

Overlap Drill PDF

 

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Basketball Coaching Interview with Jim Boone

Basketball Coaching Interview with Jim Boone

One of the most engaging aspects of the TeachHoops.com community is the ability to connect with coaches from all over. In this basketball coach interview, Coach Collins talks with basketball coaching with Jim Boone.

Basketball Coaching Interview

In this basketball coaching interview, Collins discusses a variety of topics with University of Arkansas Fort Smith head coach Jim Boone. Known for his backline defense, Boone takes a no-nonsense approach to his team.

Boone enters his third season as the UAFS head in 2021-22. However, this is his 36th year overall as a head coach at the NCAA Division I and II levels.  The veteran leader ranks eighth nationally in wins among active coaches, as well as 32nd all-time.  In addition, Boone stands only 24 wins away from reaching a career milestone of 600 wins.

Coach Boone’s career record subsequently speaks to his success on the hardwood. But his real niche has been creating championship cultures. Coaching at NCAA Division II programs, Boone posted a 483-278 (.635) mark. He guided each of his previous four Division II stops to the NCAA Tournament, an unprecedented accomplishment. In addition, Boone’s teams have won eight conference championships. He also has five tournament titles. This is in addition to 12 postseason appearances.

Don’t miss the interview from the Teach Hoops YouTube channel below.

Related: Basketball Coach Interview With Eric Bridgeland

Resources:

 

 

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Contant Information

Jim Boone, Head Basketball Coach, University of Arkansas Fort Smith – Twitter: @CoachJimBoone

Basketball Interview with Coach Mark Cascio

Basketball Interview with Coach Mark Cascio

One of the most engaging aspects of the TeachHoops.com community is the ability to connect with coaches throughout the nation and all over the world. In this basketball coach interview, Coach Collins connects with Coach Mark Cascio to discuss his basketball journey and his approach to the game.

Basketball Coach Interview

Mark Cascio stands as a championship-winning head basketball coach with 14-plus years experience in building elite programs, winning cultures, and developing leaders that create memorable experiences. Coach Cascio’s expertise lies in implementing innovative systems on both ends of the floor using advanced knowledge and practices to build winning teams.

Cascio recently joined the coaching staff at Appalachian State University. He arrived at App State after enjoying a successful career as a high school basketball coach for 16 years in Louisiana. He sports a career mark of 333-163 while posting 12 straight winning seasons. In his 16-year tenure, Cascio advanced to five Louisiana High School Athletic Association State Final Fours. This is highlighted by a state championship in 2012. His teams captured seven district titles. And he won seven Coach of the Year awards.

In 16 years as a head coach, he’s led his teams to nine, 20-win seasons and a pair of 30-win campaigns.

In his most recent stop at Catholic High School, he led them to an impressive 174-77 record since 2013. His teams advanced to four final fours, as well as capturing four district titles. And he won four Coach of the Year awards.

Cascio coached Christian Life Academy from 2010-13, where he posted a 75-20 record. In addition, he won a state title and three consecutive seasons with 20-plus victories.

Cascio has conducted basketball clinics across the country while giving mentorship and consulting experience at the international, NBA, NCAA, High School, AAU, and youth levels in part with Courtside Consulting.

Related: Interview with Coach Jim Boone

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

 Contact Information:

Markcascio@gmail.com
coachcascio.com
@markcascio
@coachcascio

Teach Hoops

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Basketball Coach Interview With Eric Bridgeland

Basketball Coach Interview With Eric Bridgeland

One of the most engaging aspects of the TeachHoops.com community is the ability to connect with coaches throughout the nation and all over the world. In this basketball coach interview, Coach Collins connects with Coach Eric Bridgeland to discuss his basketball journey and his approach to the game.

Basketball Coach Interview

Eric Bridgeland is the head men’s basketball coach at the University of Redlands in Redlands, California.

Bridgeland arrived at Redlands as an esteemed NCAA Division III coach from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington. There he led the Blues to three Northwest Conference (NWC) titles and six runner-up finishes. During the last five years, Whitman has qualified for the NCAA tournament each season and advanced to the Sweet-16, Elite-8, and Final Four. His 2019 seniors graduated as the winningest class in NCAA Division III history. And they contributed to three undefeated titles in NWC action and a 67-conference game win streak.

In 12 seasons at Whitman, Bridgeland posted an impressive record of 245-87 (.738) and an NWC mark of 132-44 (.750%). In addition, he owns multiple national, regional, and conference coach of the year awards. His teams consistently land among the national rankings, as highlighted by the No. 1 spot on the D3hoops.com poll late in the 2017 season.

Prior to coaching at Whitman, he served as the head coach at the University of Puget Sound (WA) for five seasons. After taking over a program that had one winning season in the previous nine, Bridgeland and the Loggers put together a stretch of three consecutive NWC titles, three NCAA appearances, and a No. 8 ranking.

Overall, Bridgeland has coached one national player of the year, 12 All-Americans, six conference MVPs, and 40 all-conference selections.  He also sent another student-athlete to the NBA combine as one of only five Division III players to be invited in the history of the league.

Check out the Teach Hoops exclusive interview with Coach Bridgeland below. This discussion came in 2019, prior to Bridgeland’s joining the Bulldogs in Redlands.

Related: Basketball Coach Interview with Aseem Rastogi

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Ep: 951 Interview With Eric Bridgeland ( Part 1)

Ep: 952 Interview With Eric Bridgeland ( Part 2)

Downloadable PDF Content:

Box Drill 1 Diagram

Box Drill 1 Explained

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Conducting Effective Basketball Tryouts

Conducting Effective Basketball Tryouts

Conducting an effective basketball tryout can be one of the most difficult aspects of coaching, especially at the youth level. Coaches want to be fair and unbiased in their preparation of tryouts. Coaches need to be ready to evaluate a wide gamut of talent, from kids who’ve never played before to seasoned veterans.

Often time, developing your tryout can be more difficult that even setting up a playing rotation. Tryout day stands as one of the hardest yet most important days on the calendar. How a coach assembles to roster has wide ranging implications for the season.

Conducting Effective Basketball Tryouts

The first question any coach needs to ask themself is: what type of team will you have? The answer to this question will largely influence the types of drills you select. These drills will be staples of any practice plan, but they’ll also be valuable evaluation tools during tryouts.

The first thing to consider is athleticism. Coaches need to implement some sort of transition drill into any effective tryout. Players need to demonstrate how well they run and what type of shape they’re in. From there, higher level transition drills can evaluate decision making skills as well.

Beyond transition drills, coaches should definitely include station work as well. This is particularly useful with multiple coaches on staff. But even if you’re working alone as a coach, being able to have the players rotate through stations will give you a glimpse at their skill level. These stations can include ball handling, form shooting and free throws, among other things.

Small game groups also provides the coach with a good read of the players during tryouts. Having the players play 3-on-3, 2-on-2, or even 1-on-1 brings together several of the evaluation elements you need to consider. In these small group environments, it’s harder for players to “hide.”

Another effective practice during basketball tryouts might be to teach a new drill or offensive set. This forces the players to pay attention for a long stretch of time. It also provides coaches with a look at who the most engaged athletes are. Coaches also get a sense of who the most “coachable” players are during these teaching moments.

Finally, adding some element of communication and teamwork remains incredibly important and valuable. These drills or situations can shine a light on players with leadership potential. They also provide players with an opportunity to stand out among the others.

What to Look For In Players

Assembling a roster can often be a difficult task. But the first thing a coach should consider, especially when working off a roster that has returning players, is, which of these new talents can fill a specific role.

Of these potential new players, are there any that clearly make the team better? Which of the player will the team community? What positions might these new players fill?

Coaches should always look for specific elements as well. Among those elements: Athleticism, Attitude and Effort are key. Beyond that, physical aspects like height and length play a role. Finally, does the player have an “X factor”?

Related: Youth Player Development and Practice Planning

Resources:

Downloadable PDF Content

Player Tryout Forms

Valuable Tryout Rubric – Skills and Scoring

Coach’s Tryout Outline

High School Hoops Podcast

Ep: 57 Conducting Basketball Tryouts

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Basketball Coach Interview with Aseem Rastogi

Basketball Coach Interview with Aseem Rastogi

One of the most engaging aspects of the TeachHoops.com community is the ability to connect with coaches throughout the nation and all over the world. In this basketball coach interview, Coach Collins connects with Aseem Rastogi to discuss his basketball journey and his approach to the game.

Basketball Coach Interview

Aseem Rastogi joined the Brandeis women’s basketball staff prior to the 2019-20 season as an assistant coach.

Rastogi coached girls and basketball at the scholastic level in Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C., for seven years prior to joining the Judges. As the head varsity coach at South County High School in Lorton, Virginia, he coached his team to a record-breaking season in 2018-29. The team achieved its first-ever ranking in The Washington Post (#18). In addition, the team set school records for points in a game (81), 3-pointers made in a season (124), assists in a season (308), and points in a season (1257).

Before that, at W.T. Woodson High, Rastogi helped the program host its first district playoff game. Also, the team appeared in its first regional playoff game in 5 years. During this time, Rastogi developed nine different all-district players. He also coordinated the first-ever girls elite camp in the history of Northern Virginia girls basketball.

Prior to that, Rastogi spent 2012-13 at Division I Virginia Commonwealth University as Director of Player Personnel and Interim Director of Basketball Operations.

In this wide ranging discussion, Coach Collins and Coach Rastogi drill down deep into his basketball journey and philosophy. Check out the interview from the Teach Hoops YouTube Channel below.

Resources:

Click here for a SAMPLE PRACTICE PLAN from Coach Collins’ basketball coach interview with Coach Rastogi.

Coach Unplugged Podcast

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Basketball Shot Tracker

Basketball Shot Tracker

Offseason development remains one of the most important elements for any basketball team. Both players and the program as a whole need to focus on skill improvement during the long summer months between seasons. While there are plenty of approaches a coach or player might consider, the use of a basketball shot tracker can be one of the most impactful.

Basketball Shot Tracker

Basketball Shot Tracker

Now, we’re not talking about the wearable sensor here when discussing this shot tracker. No, this tracker uses a traditional statistical logging sheet to give a player or program a wide view of a shooter’s performance.

This tool is a particularly one because it helps the players and the coaches better understand an individual’s strengths as a shooter. Sometimes the eye-test works, but other times, having black-and-white statistics helps paint a clearer picture.

The sheet itself sports columns for two-pointers made and attempted, three-pointers made and attempted, as well as free throws made and attempted. This simple set up affords the shooter with a clear view of the areas where they need improvement.

The sheet can be adapted to further breakdown shot attempts by area on the floor. By having the players log their makes and misses, the coach incorporates accountability to the offseason workouts.

Related: Basketball Shooting Workout

Resources:

EXCEL SHEET DOWNLOAD: Teachhoops_Basketball Shot_Tracker 2020

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Developing Basketball Culture and Practice Planning

Developing Basketball Culture and Practice Planning

Coach Collins sits down with Coach Patrick O’Neill of Ulster University to discuss developing basketball culture and practice planning. Coming from Ireland, O’Neill needed to developing his program’s culture largely from scratch.

Developing Basketball Culture

O’Neill says their team culture is comprised of three essential pillars: values, attitudes, and goals.  He calls values the standards of behavior, often a judgment of what is important in life. Attitudes are defined as the way a player thinks and feels about something. O’Neill defines goals as “the object of a person’s ambition or effort.” Also, “an aim or desired result.”

O’Neill leaned on four keys during his coaching career. He says honest communication stands as one of the most important elements within his program. He also said he realized he needed to up his coaching game, focusing on preparation. The other two keys he relied upon were balance and understanding.

He empowered his players to take ownership of their own development, and he understood the individual circumstances for his players. O’Neill made it a point to make himself available and approachable to the players as well.

But O’Neill admits it wasn’t all perfect. He learned very quickly “shoehorning” a player into his philosophy could be counter productive. Good coaches adapt their approach for each new collection of players they come across. He also admitted being totally positive, especially in the face of defeat, did not work.

Practice Planning

developing basketball cultureCoach O’Neill went on to discuss his approach to practice planning.

O’Neill approaches each session with a detailed plan of attack. He portions off practice segments with specific focuses. Some of the sections include warm up, skill development, and team-wide work.

Within each section, O’Neill’s practice plan lists the specific drill that will be conducted. In addition, he adds the points of emphasis during the segments and drills.

This level of organization allows O’Neill to maximize practice time and move seamlessly between focuses.

Check out the fascinating interview with Coach O’Neill below from the Teach Hoops YouTube Channel.

Related: Building a Basketball Brand, Culture and Program

Resources:

Click to view Developing Basketball Culture PowerPoint

Coach Unplugged Podcast

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Basketball Practice Planning with Sean Doherty

Basketball Practice Planning with Sean Doherty

Planning any program’s basketball practice remains one of the most important aspects of coaching. No matter if it’s a preseason workout, in-season session, or postseason shoot around, a well-organized practice produces meaningful results.

Coach Collins sat down recently with veteran basketball coach Sean Doherty to discuss his approach practice planning. Coach Doherty currently serves as the head boys coach at Hamden Hall Country Day. Doherty sports more than 20 years experience coaching basketball, including stops as a former Division-1 assistant at Holy Cross, Western Kentucky and Quinnipiac. In addition to those duties, Doherty also served as a top assistant at Division II powerhouse Assumption College, as well as being the former head coach at Salem State.

Basketball Practice Planning

basketball practiceCoach Doherty urges all other basketball coaches to be organized. He suggests meeting with staff to discuss daily and weekly practice plans. If coaching without a staff, he still recommends detailed planning, including a written plan for players to see such as a “Daily Improvement Sheet.”

He calls it integral that coaches have a firm understanding of plays/drills need to be cover during season heading into their first practice.

Doherty also recommends a weekly plan for the team, which includes off the court events. He likens this to lessons plans for classroom teachers.

Doherty says: “Practice is where we create our winning culture.” He calls for accountability should be in all segments. He also recommends tracking Effort Stats. Part of the culture development includes teaching “great teammate” elements, such as: run to guys who fall/take charge, make a huge hustle play, bench up and down, high fives, emotion at right time, etc.

To handle winning and losing correctly, Doherty recommends competitive practice games. This also aids in accountability.”Enthusiasm and Energy is a huge part of all our winning habits,” Doherty says.

Check out the full interview with Coach Doherty from the Teach Hoops YouTube Channel below.

Related: Practice Planning and Building Culture with Coach Thompson

Resources:

PDF Handouts: EFFORT STAT SHEET

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Teach Hoops

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Basketball Shooting Workout

Basketball Shooting Workout

Developing the right series of basketball shooting workouts remains one of the most important aspects for any basketball coach. No matter the level of the team, the correct drills that teach and reinforce fundamental skills stand as valuable part of any practice plan.

Basketball Shooting Workouts: 4 Rounds

basketball shooting workouts

The first drill to consider incorporating into your basketball shooting workouts is called “4 Rounds.”

This drill can be done individually or within a small group setting.

For this drill, the shooter progresses through a series of spots in the half court, focusing on form and rhythm.

The first two shots from any of the sections remains a form-shooting attempt. The player should use only one hand and focus specifically on release and spin.

The next two shots build on the form-shooting element, now incorporating the guide hand. But with these shots, the shooter still does not leave the floor with the attempt. For the final shot in the section, the shooter steps beyond the three-point line and shoots from there. That attempt should incorporate all of the fundamentals for proper form, elevation and release.

As the shooter progresses through this sequence, they must keep track of their makes. Any miss moves the shooter to the next section. The goal of the drill is to make as many attempts as possible while maintaining proper form throughout.

The name “4 Rounds” comes from the drill’s set up, since every shooter progresses through the drill four times. 100 stands as the most points a shooter can score.

One way to stress proper form with this drill is to require “perfect shots” with the first two attempts in each section. A “perfect shot” is one that’s made without touching the rim. This can also be adapted to be a useful competitive practice game.

Basketball Shooting Workouts: Burner Drill

basketball shooting workouts The next drill a coach should consider adding to their basketball shooting workouts is called the “burner drill.”

The “Burner Drill” stands as a useful sequence either in pre-practice warm up or in post-practice wrap up.

For this drill, a single shooter takes three-pointers for five minutes. One or two additional players provide rebounding and passing support for the shooter.

As the shooter navigates the five minute time limit, he or she should focus on form and elevation. The shooter must set his or her feet before each shot attempt. Shooters should also get in the habit of preparing to shoot before the ball even arrives in their hands.

Shooting for five consecutive minutes often leaves the shooter gassed. The drill “burns” the shooters energy. But it’s important for the shooter to maintain the proper form even in the closing moments of the drill.

This drill can be adapted to be an individual workout as well, with the shooter retrieving the ball after each shot attempt. In that case, the shooter can take shots from a variety of spots along the three-point arc. This, too, can be adapted to be a competitive practice game.

Related: Basketball Shooting Drill For Any Level

Resources:

Teach Hoops

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1-2-2 Basketball Press

1-2-2 Basketball Press

Developing the right defensive approach can often be one of the most difficult tasks for coaches at any level. Defense often directly leads to wins. As the cliche goes: Defense wins championships. So when a coach is faced with the decision to develop a pressure system for the team, there are a number of choices. Among them, the 1-2-2 basketball press stands as an effective option, especially for coaches with developing teams.

1-2-2 Basketball Press

1-2-2 basketball pressThe good thing about the 1-2-2 basketball press is that it’s fairly easy to coach. This press also stands as a relatively safe option for coaches who don’t want to leave the back line of the defense open. This press also becomes particularly effective when the player at the top can provide ample pressure on the ball.

This defensive alignment takes advantage of a team’s best athletes. The primary strength of this press remains the constant application of ball pressure. This press also allows the defense to control the tempo and flow of the ball game. It can be particularly useful in places that incorporate a shot clock.

The 1-2-2 press allows the defense to trap along the side line. It often forces the offense into awkward counter alignments, which can lead to mistakes and turnovers.

While other full court presses, like the 2-2-1 or “diamond” press, try to leverage the back court to force a turnover, those alignments often leave the back end lightly covered. The 1-2-2 press keeps a pair of players back, doubling that back line.

This press can be useful in breaking an opponent’s offensive rhythm. It can also be folded back into several different half court zones or even a man-to-man.

Coaches must stress protecting the middle of the floor when implementing this press. Coaches should also stress trapping along the side line.

Communication is key with this press, like any other, because each offensive pass will require a defensive realignment on the floor.

Watch the video below where Coach Collins and Coach Jaryt Hunziker talk through all of the alignments and permutations of this press.

Related: Basketball Full Court Presses

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast

Teach Hoops

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Favorite Basketball Drill with Nabil Murad

Favorite Basketball Drill with Nabil Murad

Youth player development can be an avenue for coaches to share their love of the game. But if a team is going to be successful, it takes more than just love. Coaches are tasked with improving players both individually and within the context of the team. And during the planning stages, including a favorite basketball drill might make practice all the more enjoyable.

Coach Nabil Murad has been working in the Education & Sports Sector for more than 10 years. Nabil has a proven track record of developing players to achieve their full potential using tailored development programs and a variety of motivational methods. Murad is currently in Austria working with Gmunden Swans youth basketball program to develop players along the player development pathway.

Murad joined Coach Collins to discuss practice planning, youth player development and his favorite basketball drill.

Favorite Basketball Drill: One-Way Basket

favorite basketball drillThis is a full-court competitive practice game that allows coaches to install a specific play or set, while also practice key defensive principles. In the half court, the offense runs their first action against a full compliment of defenders. If this action results in a basket, then the offense and defense switch. But if the defense gets a stop, then it’s a full court game.

The defensive stop flows into transition offense as that squad seeks to score. Only points scored off of defensive stops count in this competitive practice game. This game should flow back and forth for several minutes before coaches change anything.

Emphasis: Defense. Basketball coaches that incorporate this competitive practice game look to establish the mindset that the team needs to focus on getting defensive stops before getting to the offensive end of the floor.

Related: Youth Player Development and Practice Planning

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast: 

Ep: 676. Drill of the Day – Coach Nabil Murad Favorite Drill(s)

Youth Player Development

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Building a Basketball Brand, Culture and Program

Building a Basketball Brand, Culture and Program

Finding an identity for a team stands as one of the most unique challenges for coaches. Building a Basketball Brand, Culture and Program, not matter the level, must be done on a solid foundation. Without clear principles, the program might drift along listless and without direction. For coaches, creating an environment to empower the student-athletes remains one of the most important undertakings.

Building a Basketball Brand, Culture and Program

Coach Heath Neal joined Coach Collins to discuss Building a Basketball Brand, Culture and Program on the Teach Hoops YouTube channel and Coach Unplugged podcast.

In this wide ranging interview, Coach Neal discussed his journey to becoming the head girls basketball coach at Pea Ridge High school, in Pea Ridge, Arkansas. Neal went from Arkansas State University to the US Navy. He served for five years and deployed all over the world. That military training still informs much of his coaching approach.

After the military, Neal returned to the University of Arkansas to finish his degree. There, he became a student athletic trainer for the Razorback football team, then led by Bobby Petrino.

In his five years coaching at Pea Ridge, Neal’s compiled a 78-47 record overall and a finish in the elite eight of the state tournament.

Core Values

An important foundation for any program to build upon is a definitive set of values. These core values inform everything within the program, from commitment to the players, to communication with families.

For Coach Neal, the core values that support his program are: Truth, Trust, Togetherness, Integrity, Competitiveness, Competition, Effort and Intensity.

Neal notes building a basketball brand players and the community will be excited for is key. He says:

“Confidence is earned through detailed preparation.”

In addition, Neal says building the program relationship driven. Connections within the community help build excitement. And that excitement ultimately leads to positive support.

Coaches must remember the importance of their position. A coach remains one of the most influential individuals in society. A coach will influence more people in one year than most people in a lifetime.

Check out the interview in the resources below.

Related: Building a Basketball Program

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast:

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Building a Basketball Program

Building a Basketball Program

Coaches are great thieves. Resources, materials and terminology are often swapped online, at clinics, and even during basketball games. But where coaches can introduce the most unique elements comes in the specific development of a program’s culture. Building a basketball program comes down to what commitments a coach wants to make.

Building a Basketball Program

Coach Collins sat down with Coach Burton Uwarow to discuss building a basketball program. In this video on the Teach Hoops YouTube channel, the two went through the ins and outs of establishing an identity. This establishment involved specific commitments and focuses coaches need to consider when starting their programs.

Coach Uwarow, from Greenville, South Carolina, said the coaches he played for growing up and coached with greatly influenced his coaching philosophy. Uwarow also listed resources from Bob Hurley, Mike Krzyzewski, Pat Summitt, John Wooden and Morgan Wootten as significant influences as well.

Uwarow called commitment and passion his driving forces. He also acknowledged building a program also involves gathering resources. Supplementing budgets from an athletic department through fundraisers stands as an unwelcome but important task for any program.

Among the most important elements he named, Uwarow stressed organization, player discipline and parent-coach relationships.

Check out the full interview with Coach Uwarow below.

Related: Building a Basketball Brand, Culture and Program

Resources:

Coach Unplugged Podcast:

Teach Hoops

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Basketball Shooting Drill For Any Level

Basketball Shooting Drill For Any Level

Developing the right basketball shooting drill remains one of the key elements for any successful coach. Considering the sometimes wild variation of skill level within a team, it’s important that these exercises can maximize any player’s potential. Coaches sift through hundreds of options and seemingly countless variations, hoping to find something that works for their team.

Coaches know that not every player can do everything on the floor. Players have their strengths and weaknesses. And it’s the task of a good developmental coach to find the right drills to improve upon those weaknesses while growing those strengths.

Basketball Shooting Drill: Around the Horn

basketball shooting drillAround the Horn is a useful basketball shooting drill for players at any level. This drill also provides coaches with the ability to set up individual workouts as well as integrate team elements.

Players might recognize a version of this drill as the old playground game “around the world.”

This drill emphasizes repetition. The shooter progresses through seven spots, arrayed around the perimeter of the floor.

Depending upon the skill level of the shooter, this drill could being near the key, in the midrange, or beyond the three-point arc.

As an individual exercise, this drill involves the shooter taking their shot, then tracking down the rebound. This drill can be adapted to include a rebounder and a passer. Those additional players would also find value in this drill, considering they get to work on other skills as well.

To implement this drill well, the shooter must maintain the proper shooting form throughout. Getting their feet set and hands ready to receive the pass also stand as important elements to this drill.

Adding the timing element allow for the player to focus and provide max effort through the progression. This could also become a competitive practice game.

Basketball Shooting Drill: M-Drill

basketball shooting drillAnother valuable basketball shooting drill is the M-Drill. In this sequence, a shooter navigates a timed progression of shots while a teammate rebounds and feeds the ball.

The shooter moves through five perimeter spots on the floor, taking a shot from each one. The shooter can’t move on to the next spot until they’ve made a shot at each stop.

This drill adds an element of urgency through the one-minute time limit. Shooters must progress quickly and efficiently, concentrating on their form, foot work and movement.

The M-Drill is designed to be a multi-round set. The goal for each shooter is to make it to the next round. Round one involves the shooter making one shot from each spot. Round two increases the number to two makes from each spot. The subsequent rounds also increase in makes, but the time never does.

The goal for each shooter is to remain focused and disciplined despite the time crunch. This drill can help in developing end-of-game situations as well.

Related: Basketball Shooting Drills

 

Resources:

Teach Hoops

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